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Full text of "The Game breeder"

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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



VE 




LIBRARY 



OF THE 



Museum of Comparative Zoology 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/gamebreeder131918hunt 




Single Copies 10' 







T H Er 



GAntw 





VOL. XIII. 



APRIL, 1918 




m 



til 






The- Object op this magazine- is 



TO MAKE" NORTH AMERICA THE 5IGGEST 

Game Producing Country in the World I! 




No. 1 




THE LEAPING MALLARD 
Photograph sent by F. W. Pickering 



PUSLISNED BY 



TH& GAME: CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A r.»^v,j 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliii 




\1S: 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 2O0 best 
Royal Swans of England- I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancv PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
af'land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 
I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large' orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying' elsewhere — It will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am nnlv fiO miles from New York and 30 miles from PhitadelDhia 





Department 




YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY. PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 
S 



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THE GAME BREEDER 



INFALLIBLE 




HIGH GUN 
IDEAL 
PREMIER 
TARGET 

pemin^totr 

ARROW 
NITRO CLUB 



SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



(j ffiBLACK SHEL1S 

^^ AJAX 

CLIMAX 

I E 



FIELD 
RECORD 



J 



Winchester 




REPEATER 
LEADER 



Put It There 

Into your favorite gun goes your favorite shell. Make 
sure that into your favorite shell has gone a Hercules 
Smokeless Shotgun Powder — either Infallible or 
"E.C." 

These powders are the choice of many an old hand at 
the traps and in the field. They have won the confi- 
dence of these men on account of their unusually light 
recoil, high velocity, and even patterns, and uniformity 
in quality 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 

INFALLIBLE "£.C" 

may be obtained in the fourteen different shells illus- 
trated in the column to the left. Your favorite shell 
is certainly among these fourteen. 

You can readily tell whether or not it contains In- 
fallible or "E.C." On the outside of the box in 
which the shells are sold and on the top wad of the 
shell itself appears the name of the powder it contains. 
Look for the name of a Hercules Powder. If you 
don't see it, ask for it. You can get it in the shell you 
shoot. 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

77 W. 11th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 




THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — More Canvasbacks Quail for Anna Arundel Quail 

for Breeding Purposes — Game Scarce on the Staked Plains Reading 

Notices Changed Times — Conference of the Protectives The Dinner — 

Grouse Breeding — Quiet vs. Noisy Refuges. 

Closed Seasons --------- By the Editor 

Mallard Breeding in Michigan - - - - - A. B. Dusette 

Black Duck and How To Raise Them - - - R. E. Bullock 

The Weasel - - - M. J. Newhouse 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - - - By Our Readers 

Game Breeding at Cornell University — Buying Eggs Losses Due 

to Transportation — Removing Eggs from the Nests of Game Birds 

Importance of Dusting Places — Quail and Grouse Breeding 

Big Demand for Pure Bred Wild Ducks Black Ducks Bad Luck 

with Heath Hens Quail Breeding — Rice Damage by Ducks 

Fireworks Used to Frighten Birds in Rice Fields Safe to Pur- 
chase from Our Advertisers — Increase of Fanatics Gulls as Sub- 
marine Detectors — Aviators Study Birds. 

Editorials Keep the Money at Home — Two Requests — A Quail and 

Grouse Year — The Weasel. 

Outings and Innings— Trade Notes, etc. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

ISO Nassau Street, New York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enclosed. 

Name , '. 

Street 

City 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



THE GAME BREEDER 




CHALLENGE CLE AN ABLE 

COLLARS 

A Touch and It's Clean 

Save laundry bills — save collar expense— have 
a clean collar always. Figure your average 
collar costs— the life of the average collar — 
the cost of frequent laundering. Then com- 
pare the result with 

Challenge 
Cleanable Collars 

Here is a collar with the same dull linen, stitched edged 
effect of a laundered collar — yet one that requires no 
laundering. A positively non-wilting, permanently 
white collar— water-proof stiffened instead of starched, 
and instantly refreshed with a little soap and water. 
Admirable for dancing and almost indispensable for 
motoring because of its rain, perspiration, oil and dust 
proof qualities. 

Made in eighteen styles, half sizes. Sold by enterpris- 
ing department and men's furnishing stores everywhere. 
Try them. Check the coupon. State your size and 
style — and send 25c. for sample. 

The Arlington Works 

Owned and operated by 

E. I. dti Pont de Nemours &Co. 

725 Broadway NEW YORK 



Mark X before subject tha* interests you- 
and Mai! this Coupon to 

f. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

Advertising Division 
Wilmington G.B. Delaware 




Challenge Collars 




Py-ra-lin Toilet Goods 




Novelty Sheeting 


— 


Transparent Sheeting 




Py-ra-lin Specialties 




Auto Enamel 


- 


Rayntite Top Material 


: Motor Fabrikoid 


'Craftsman Fabrikoid 


- Industrial Dynamites 


|Trapshooting 




Commercial Acids 


|Dyes and Bases 


Name 


Address 


City 


State 






ll'niH 



""""'mwu,//,,,,,,,//'""" 



THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR BUSINESS IS 

MAKING GUNS 




For over 50 years we have made big 
guns, little guns, good guns— The "OLD 
RELIABLE " Parker Guns. 

Send for Catalogue and 20 Bore Booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROTHERS meriden, conn., 

NEW YORK SALESROOMS, 32 WARRf=N STRFCT 



U. S. A. 



BIRD HOUSES. 



Field sports undoubtedly tend to keep 
people in the country and to make coun- 
try places attractive. Since the laws 
have been amended making it legal to 
have game birds for sport and for food 
many rural owners have taken an interest 




in producing and protecting the game on 
their places and many people have cre- 
ated country estates where game always 
is plentiful. 

The practical protection given to the 



game causes a rapid increase in the num- 
bers of song and insectivorous birds and 
we have been pleased to observe that 
sportsmen who have country places have 
begun to take a great interest in the 
smaller birds. Many readers of The 
Game Breeder provide special shelters, 
nest boxes and foods for the birds and 
all, we feel sure, will be glad to learn 
that a new and attractive bird house has 
been placed on the market, for fifteen 
cents, postpaid. 

It is not often that we become suf- 
ficiently enthusiastic about anything to 
write any special notice of it. This bird 
house, however, appealed to us at once as 
something which our readers should 
have for their country places. It is well 
made, watertight and in color and tex- 
ture closely resembles the gray tones of 
the back of a tree. 

We had an idea when we first read the 
copy that the price, 15 cents, must be a 
mistake. A few minutes after a sample 
box was sent to us. One of our readers 
who owns a country place came in and 
when we observed he was. interested in 
the box we asked him what he thought 
the price was. He said he would guess 
$2.00. When we told him the price he 
said he had many small birds on his 
place and they certainly could have 
houses at that price. 

We think it likely the price of the 
bird boxes like the price of other things 
will go up and we advise our readers to 
read the advertisement on another page 
and to send their orders for bird houses 
promptly. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, Juiy g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME XIII 



APRIL, 1918 

Co} 



NUMBER i 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



More Canvasbacks. 

Milliard Cantler, a local hunter, killed 36 
canvasback ducks off Mill Creek, four miles 
from Annapolis, and John Crandell appeared 
in Annapolis with three canvasbacks that he 
was offering for sale at the modest price of 
$1.25 a piece. He had killed them on the bay 
about twelve miles from this city. — Live News 
Notes. 

The price $1.25 for a canvasback does 
seem modest at present. We can re- 
member, however, the time when $1.25 
was rather high. We bought teal, which 
we prefer to the larger ducks, for 10 
cents each. We predict that before long 
the low prices for dead game will again 
appear and since they will be founded on 
common sense they will be permanent 
as the low prices for wild trapped and 
shot game are in all civilized countries 
excepting America. We refer to dead 
game, because the prices for live game 
and for eggs will remain higher for 
well-known reasons. 

Quail for Anne Arundel. 

Remington Live News Notes quotes 
the Evening Capital, Annapolis, Md., 
thus: 

The experiment of introducing quail has 
proved successful. One thousand Alabama 
birds were liberated last year in this county, 
and hunters bagged them or their brood dur- 
ing the late hunting season. 

We did not know that Alabama fur- 
nished birds to be shot in other state*. 
We presume the Anne Arundels will be 
in the market for another lot for next 
fall's shooting and will keep buying while 
they last. 

Professor Pearson, when he was acting 
as- game officer for North Carolina, de- 
cided, rightly, that it was bad business for 



his state to ship job lots of quail to Penn- 
sylvania, there to be promptly extermin- 
ated for sport. Rare old Dr. Kalbfus 
kicked some but we think he knows 
enough to know that the professor was 
right in not permitting the reduction 
of game in one state simply to let the 
people exterminate it in another. 

Quail for Breeding Purposes. 

Professor Pearson agrees with us that 
it is quite another matter to permit the 
trapping and shipping of live quail for 
breeding purposes — in order that thou- 
sands of quail may be made to grow 
where few or none grew before. 

Upon one occasion the professor is- 
sued a permit to the writer, who in good 
faith wished to procure a few dozen 
North Carolina quail for breeding pur- 
poses. Due to our careless handling of 
the matter a notice was published in a 
local paper calling for quail. The idea 
spread that we were about to move all 
of the quail in the country and excite- 
ment galore followed. The legislature 
was in session at Raleigh and a bill was 
passed in record time — a few minutes, 
we were told — prohibiting the shipping 
of quail from the state. A few letters 
from us explained the matter satisfactor- 
ily and we understand North Carolina 
is today as quiet as it ever was. We 
found it so upon recent visits. No signs 
of the riot remain. 

Game Scarce on the Staked Plains. 

George W. Symonds of the Texas 
Herald says : 

Too late the early settlers on this section 
of the Staked Plains, and their descendants, 



6 



THE GAME BREEDER 



learned the value of game conservation. Forty 
odd years ago, when I was a Texas Ranger, 
these wide and treeless prairies teemed with 
game — antelope, buffalo, some deer, prairie 
chickens, quail, and, after a rain, myriads of 
water fowl in the lakes. 

Today there are a few antelope privately 
owned and rigidly protected. There are some 
quail, an occasional prairie chicken and a few 
migratorv water fowl. 



Reading Notices. 

We are glad always to publish read- 
ing notices about what our advertisers 
are doing and also stories about how to 
rear any species successfully. Such mat- 
ters no doubt help the advertisement but 
it is such matter we are sure which most 
interests our readers. 

Changed Times. 

Since the arresting of breeders for 
having stock birds in their possession 
is going out of fashion, we are called 
upon less frequently to defend members 
of the society in the courts. We are glad 
of this. Y\ e never liked the practice of 
criminal law, and it is only from a sense 
of duty that we have denounced the ar- 
rest of people for doings which are not 
criminal in any civilized country ex- 
cepting America. 

One result of our activity has been the 
amendments to many laws ; another has 
been to reduce the number of fool ar- 
rests by grafters for the sake of 
moieties. 

Our readers, no doubt, will be glad 
to know that the atmosphere has been 
cleared sufficiently in many states for 
us to forget about many silly game 
law crimes and to record the excellent 
work of many breeders in the sunshine 
of the present more happy conditions. 

We never believed our readers cared 
so much about reading stories of hew 
ladies and gentlemen were arrested for 
taking home food legally procured or 
about arrests and fines for taking: esrg-s 
from irrigated fields and other exposed 
situations, in order to procure "more 
game,"' as they do for stories about how 
to make money with game, how to supply 
the people with food and ' how to have 
good shooting. These topics will fill our 
pages in the future. Xow that quiet reigns 



we hope our readers will send more 
and more notes about their experiences 
in the rearing fields and fewer and fewer 
notes about the outrageous arrests of 
b/eeders. 

Although we were i ejected for mili- 
tary duty we still keep our fighting 
clothes, so to speak, and if necessary we 
will turn on the searchlight of publicity 
when an occurrence may require it, and 
we will defend any breeder threatened 
with an excessive fine when it appears 
that by so doing the result will be to in- 
vite attention to a legal wrong and to 
see that the law permitting it be re- 
paired by amendment. 

We care far less about such contro- 
versial matters than we do for the bright- 
er work in the rearing fields and with 
the gun, over dogs or decoys, and we are 
glad to report that the times have 
changed. 

Xow is the time to send -advertise- 
ments of eggs and it is well to offer 
birds, one day old and larger stock, for 
summer and fall delivery. 



Conference of the Protectives. 

The annual conference of the Ameri- 
can Game Protective Association was 
held Monday and Tuesday, M arch 4 and 
5, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New 
York. Several score of people attended 
and the conference closed with a dinner 
at the hotel which attracted more people 
than could give the time to the day ses- 
sions. 

The program included an able opening 
address by the chairman, Wm. B. Boul- 
ton, reports of the various committees, a 
plea for experiments in breeding the 
grouse by Dr. A. K. Fisher, a paper on 
standardized practices in the sale and 
shipment of game by R. A. Chiles, 
Louisiana the winter home of America's 
game (with moving pictures), M. Alex- 
ander conservation commission of Loui- 
siana, the need of more widespread 
knowledge of game preserving in Amer- 
ica, A. G. McVicar ; the conservation of 
fish, Geo. D. Pratt ; the menace to bird 
life in a weakening of game laws, T. G. 
Pearson ; supply of game and relaxation 
of laws, T. W. Hornaday ; sportsman's 



THE GAME BREEDER 



attitude to impair laws, J. B. Burnham ; 
the status of the Heath hen, W, C. 
Adams, chairman Massachusetts commis- 
sion ; the bob-white quail, George G. Phil- 
lips, chairman commissioners on birds, 
Rhode Island ; Teaching game farming at 
Cornell University. 

We regret that Mr. Chiles could not 
attend since he is a member of our game 
guild which believes, as he does, in re- 
quiring fair dealing in the sale of eggs 
and game. 

The Second Day. 

The program for the second day in- 
cluded papers on the following topics by 
the persons named : 

Statement regarding formation of 
joint committee for the protection of 
wild life during war time, Ottomar H. 
Van Xorden, chairman. 

The attitude of the United States Food 
Administration toward the conservation 
of game and fish, Frederic C. Walcott, 
U. S. Food Administration. 

The conservation of fish in inland wa- 
ters during war time. George D. Pratt, 
conservation commission of New York. 

The menace to all bird life involved in 
a weakening of the game protective laws, 
T. Gilbert Pearson, secretary, national as- 
sociation of Audubon societies. 

A history of the unsuccessful attempt 
to annihilate wild life in the state that 
winters the nation's birds, M. L. Alex- 
ander, conservation commissioner of 
Louisiana. 

Discussion. 

Does the supply of game justify any 
relaxation in the laws that regulate its 
taking, William T. Hornadav. chairman, 
permanet wild life protection fund. 

Whv farmers want birds protected in 
war time, , United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

How can the salt water fishes best serve 
the food situation with due regard to the 
preservation of the species ? H. M. Smith, 
chief, U. S. Bureau of Fisheries. 

The sportsman's attitude toward the 
proposal to impair game laws, John B. 
Burnham, president, American game pro- 
tective association. 

The proposal to relax protective laws 
from the viewpoint of the scientist, E. 



W. Xelson, chief, U. S. Bureau of Bio- 
logical Survey. 

Conservation of wild life in war time 
from, the point of view of the agricul- 
ture college, J. G. Needham, New York 
State College of Agriculture. 

We regret that Dr. Needham was un- 
able to attend. We published an article 
by him in our March issue. 
The Dinner. 

At the dinner excellent moving pic- 
tures of western big game were exhibited 
by Norman McClintock. Jack Minor 
also had moving pictures to illustrate his 
remarks on "My Wild Goose Sanctuary." 

Both speakers seemed inclined to favor 
hunting only with the camera. The first 
named also exhibited some movies of song 
birds and said these interested him more 
than the big game animals. 

Jack Minor said he had been a market 
gunner, and he seemed to be proud of his 
reformation. He spoke of placing bands 
containing quotations from the scriptures 
on the legs of his wild geese which 
spread the gospel in their migration, and 
there was moisture in the eyes of many 
of his auditors when, with a burst of 
pathos, he told how one of his geese was 
wounded by a naughty gunner and came 
home to die beneath a bush near the 
house. "There is the bush, gentlemen! 
There is the bush in the picture — right 
near the house ! The lady near it coming 
this way is the daughter of. my mother- 
in-law." It was suggested that possibly 
the eye moisture was due to smoke in 
the room but it may be that the speaker 
converted some of the sportsmen to the 
idea that the camera is the only proper 
weapon. 

A gentleman seated at one of the ta- 
bles fainted and was carried out ; but the 
doctor with him said the collapse was due 
to something he had eaten before coming 
to the dinner and that the patient quickly 
recovered when the cause of the disorder 
came up. The trouble was not at all 
caused by Jack Minor's pathetic oratory. 

Grouse Breeding. 

It is one thing to confer about grouse 
breeding and quite another to breed 
grouse. There can be no doubt that the 
grouse quickly can be made tremendously 



8 



THE GAME BREEDER 



abundant and kept so on suitable areas 
provided proper methods be applied. Our 
markets always should be full of grouse 
at attractive prices. If Dr. Fisher knew 
how much trouble the game conservation 
society has had in procuring grouse for 
breeding purposes in order to show the 
proper methods for increasing their 
numbers he would, we feel sure, change 
his "Plea for experiments in breeding 
the grouse family" to a "Plea for a change 
in the game laws to- enable the conserva- 
tion society to procure more grouse for 
breeding purposes." 

It has been almost impossible for us 
to get all the prairie grouse we want or 
in fact any number suitable for good 
experimental work, and we are inclined 
to think the biological survey has had a 
hand in producing the undesirable condi- 
tions. We never let up, however, when 
we go after anything and we will in time 
get plenty of grouse; but the delays are 
unfortunate, to put it mildly. We shall 
be obliged to the doctor if he will inform 
us if the biological survey can legally 
secure for us a few dozen prairie grouse 
at, say, $5 per bird or any old price 
within reason. 

If the survey can not secure the stock 
why should a public officer put in any 
time on a "Plea for experiments in breed- 
ing the grouse family" ? We will do 
the necessary work if the survey will 
furnish the stock — at our epense. 

It is one thing to advise and confer; 
it is quite another thing to get busy 
breeding grouse for sport and for profit. 
We sometimes think one of our members 
may have been right when he called at 
the office to say that conferring might be 
only another name for camouflage in or- 
der to cover the securing of more re- 
strictive game laws prohibiting the sale 
and shipping of game. 

. Read the restrictions in the pending 
migratory bird law, proposed, we under- 
stand, by the U. S. biological survey in 
consultation with the great and only wild- 
lifer, and handed to the protective asso- 
ciation to put over on the congress. Is 
there anything in the proposed law which 
would suggest a "Plea for experiments 
in breeding the wild duck family"? 



As we read the proposed law no one 
can sell or transport a duck. Will not 
future pleas for experiments with ducks 
be as idle as a plea for the grouse now 
is ? Was not the naturalist, Dr. Shufeldt, 
right when he intimated that the game 
was being protected "off the face of the 
earth"? ' 

The main plea now seems to be that 
we can save the game by prohibiting 
field sports, putting the game on the 
song-bird list, etc. We insist there is a 
better way and if the survey has any 
sincerity in its pleas it might be ex- 
hibited in an amendment to the proposed 
law reading, "Nothing in this statute shall 
apply to game owned by breeders and 
they shall be given permits to secure 
fowls for breeding purposes." 
Quiet vs. Noisy Refuges. 

We have no possible objection to the 
creation of numerous quiet refuges ad- 
vocated by the protective associations and 
professional wild-lifers. The country is 
big enough for those who are opposed 
to shooting to have such quiet refuges 
where foxes, hawks and other vermin 
will keep the game from becoming abun- 
dant. 

We believe some lively noisy "shoots" 
and game farms in every county will 
produce better results for all hands and 
that it will not be found necessary to 
make entire states into quiet refuges with 
the food birds on the song-bird list. 



Often we are asked, "Where can I pur- 
chase game ?" Our answer invariably is : 
"You can purchase with perfect safety 
from advertisers in The Game Breeder. 
Those who carry large spaces probably 
have the most game." It would be un- 
fair for us to especially recommend any 
particular dealers. In some cases where 
we happen to know a dealer has fresh 
trapped birds of the species required we 
may mention the fact in the magazine 
since we think it important that our 
readers should secure all the fresh 
trapped game which appears for sale. 



The best and the safest places to buy 
game and game eggs are always adver- 
tised in The Game Breeder. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLOSED SEASONS. 

By the Editor. 



The U. S. biological survey and the 
game protective associations seem to rely 
chiefly upon laws prohibiting shooting for 
a term of years in order to save the game 
from extinction. Such laws are only a 
temporary makeshift. It is admitted that 
the natural enemies of game and the fatal 
domestic cat ; the close cultivation of the 
land and the draining of marshes ; cli- 
mate, floods, fires, farm machinery, wires 
and other ills due to civilization all con- 
tribute to reduce the numbers of birds. 
All of the losses due to these causes con- 
tinue during and are unaffected by the 
closed season; and where rabbit shooting 
is permitted it is very generally con- 
ceded by state game officers and other 
capable observers that there will be con- 
siderable illegal shooting of the protected 
game. 

All naturalists know that when the 
game enemies are over-abundant when 
compared with the game that nature's 
balance is upset in the wrong direction 
and the species will decrease in numbers. 
The cat and the other checks to increase, 
above referred to, are enough to prevent 
any increase of the game birds in many 
areas provided the game be not properly 
looked after, especially during the breed- 
ing season when young birds are an easy 
prey to cats and many eggs are lost to 
vermin and during the open season for 
rabbits when there are losses due to il- 
legal shooting. 

At the end of the closed season it is 
usually deemed best to extend it and 
there is danger of the farmers taking a 
hand, as they did in Ohio, and making 
the closed season perpetual. 

If the game appears to have shown 
an increase in any region and the shoot- 
ing is again permitted, history will re- 
peat itself, the additional check to in- 
creased shooting, soon will be found to 
produce extermination and the whole per- 
formance must be repeated. During 
each closed period there is a loss of in- 
terest in shooting. The older sportsmen 
put away their guns and the young men 
coming of age who should be taken to 



the fields learn nothing about field sports 
because it is illegal to shoot everything 
but rabbits, and these often do not in- 
terest those who should instruct their 
younger relatives in the art of shooting 
over setters and pointers. 

There can be no doubt that a long 
closed season will not restore game to vast 
areas where it no longer occurs. A closed 
season in Ohio on wild turkeys, made at 
a time when there were some wild tur- 
keys in the state, did not result in an 
increase in the number of wild turkeys; 
the turkey became extinct. The law was 
repealed as unnecessary. There are many 
wild turkeys in Ohio today, introduced 
and produced by private industry. Should 
another law be enacted closing the sea- 
son on wild turkeys and prohibiting the 
sale of birds and eggs the result would 
be to exterminate the turkeys. If such 
a law be applied to poultry it would ex- 
terminate the poultry. 

Granting that closed seasons may seem 
expedient and necessary, we insist that 
when they are made the laws creating 
them should provide that they do not 
apply to food producers who by their 
industry are willing to produce the de- 
sirable food on lands which they own or 
rent for such purposes. 

The laws permitting pheasant and wild 
duck breeders to breed and sell these 
birds and their eggs have resulted in a 
great abundance of pheasants and ducks 
on places where the owners produce the 
game. Much of it is now sold in the 
markets as food. 

Quail and prairie grouse and the sharp- 
tailed and ruffed grouse can be produced 
in vast numbers much cheaper than 
pheasants can be, since the quail and 
prouse find most of their food in the 
fields and woods. A law prohibiting the 
shooting, eating and sale of these birds 
for a term of years or forever puts an 
end to the industry of those who have 
quail or grouse and prevents any one 
from giving them the attention needed 
to make them and keep them an abun- 
dant food. 



10 THE GAME BREEDER 

All that the game breeders ask is that closed season. We cannot comprehend 

when laws are enacted closing the season how state game officers can contentedly 

for terms of years or forever the game draw large salaries simply to see that laws 

farmers and those who look after their prohibiting shooting be enforced. It is 

game properly be excepted and given the fair to say that most of the state officers 

same rights which the pheasant and duck do not favor closed seasons and that the 

breeders now enjoy in most of the states, best officers favor game breeding on some 

It seems a great pity to encourage only of the farms which keep the game suffi- 
the breeding of foreign birds on the up- ciently plentiful everywhere to make the 
land and to prohibit the production of closed season unnecessary. 
our native grouse and quail which are We read with great interest today a 
the best game birds in the world. The letter from one of the most capable of 
last named easily can be produced in good the western state game officers in which 
numbers very cheaply in a wild state ; he said he proposed to purchase a big lot 
they quickly can be introduced and made ■ of birds and eggs and give them to all 
plentiful in states where they are extinct those who would look after them for 
or nearly so. It is evident no one will sport or for profit. The state surely 
undertake the necessary industry during soon will have an abundance of game of 
a closed season. Those who find it prof- the species which can be procured legally 
itable to put in their time securing closed and when the opulent non-resident wild- 
seasons should remember that there are lifers and protectionists blow in, seeking 
people who like to shoot and who are laws to suit their fancy in states where 
willing to introduce game and make it they do not reside the people easily will 
plentiful in places where there is little run them out and send them home with 
or no game today and where there never some good advice. 

will be any until it is introduced and A few big quail and grouse farms 

properly looked after. where thousands of birds are reared to 

Had the silly attempt to close quail be sold to intelligent state officers, similar 

shooting on Long Island, N. Y., been sue- to the one referred to, and to others 

cessful the many places where quail are w ho may wish to buy birds for restocking 

properly looked after would have been soon will put an end to closed seasons 

abandoned and the rabbit shooting and no t only in the states where the birds are 

the other enemies of quail soon would produced by the thousand for sale but 

have exterminated the birds. There are a lso in states which can be restocked by 

many quail on Long Island and many intelligent state officers operating in har- 

more will be liberated and properly mony with those who will aid the good 

looked after this year. Had the season work. 

been closed no> birds would have been pur- The state officer who will encourage 

chased and liberated during the closed quail and grouse ranches will bring thou- 

season and no doubt an increasing scare- sands of dollars to his state just as any 

ity would have made it necessary to keep other industry does, 

the season closed as . it is in some of «. 



Two Interesting Books Just Issued. 



the states. 

We fail to see why the arms and am- 
munition makers are willing to support The DuPont Company of Wilmington, Del., 
_ '-;-*,. w Ui r U favors rWH <u£enrm has just issued a very lnterestln S booklet en- 

a _ society wnicft tavors closed seasons tHled l<The Giant La , boren » It points out and 

without excepting game farmers and syn- pr0 ves the advantage of using DuPont ex- 

dicates of sportsmen who should be their plosives for various agricultural and miscel- 

best customers. A little syndicate in laneous uses. It explains what benefit ex- 

which we are interested will use many P los . ives have been in land clearing, ditching 

,, , , L . , r 11 a 1 drainage, subsoihng, tree planting, orchard 

thousands of cartridges next fall. Al- cultivation and other uses. It is a companion 

ready the members are buying guns. Not or sequel to "Handbook of Explosives," an- 

a cartridge or a gun would be purchased other recent booklet, the latter book contain- 

should a protective society or. a profes- [n S ful1 instructions as to "how" to handle 

, mi i-r i ■ i • and use explosives. Both books will be sent 

sional wild-liter succeed in making a on ap pi; ca ti n 



THE GAME BREEDER 



11 



MALLARD BREEDING IN MICHIGAN. 

By A. B. Dusette. 



Your December number of The Game 
Breeder makes me want to say some- 
thing even if some of our big breeders 
and dealers may say the little fellow 
writes for notoriety and to save expense 
in advertising. For my part I can say 
I have grown to maturity 2,500 duck- 
mallards in a single season and sold every 
bird before I had even a classified ad- 
vertisement in any magazine. I am still 
in the game only not so large ; but I have 
the stock birds that I can guarantee are 
the very best to be had; they are not 
only ornaments but they will lay and 
produce birds the same as our best 
marshes produce. Our state game de- 
partment does not allow me to capture 
or trap wild birds for market or sale. My 
experience has been that I have had a 
hard time and no end to expense getting 
what breeders I have and it has taken 
me five years to get them tame enough 
so they will lay enough eggs to pay for 
their keep, but at the present time they 
will lay at least 30 eggs each and their 
offspring is as pure as the trapped birds 
and more profitable to the breeder, as 
they are the second generation and are 
naturally more contented in confinement 
or as I keep them which I will explain. 
This may help some of our brothers that 
have poor flyers. All my birds are wing 
clipped from the 1st to the 15th of Sep- 
tember or just before the open season. 
They do not get their new feathers until 
the next July or August ; this gives them 
from four to six weeks with full wing 
to teach their young the knack of flying. 
I, of course, keep one feeding place which 
is enclosed with fine netting, same as fish 
nets are made of. Every pair bring their 
young in this yard to feed. When it is 
time to clip their wings I merely close the 
gate or entrance. This way of freedom 
for a part of the season keeps their wild 
instinct alive. I have birds that were 
trapped six years ago and no one can tell 
them from birds taken two years ago. I 
have one black drake that went south 



in the fall of 1916; he returned last spring 
and stayed with the bunch all summer 
and went south again this fall. I am sure 
he will return again in the spring of 1918, 
as he is wise enough to keep a safe dis- 
tance from any one with a gun. I, of 
course, lose some birds each season. Last 
September or the last of August a few 
parties, not sportsmen, killed some 25 
birds for me. I at once offered $25 
reward for proof of the party. No one 
claimed the reward but I lost no more 
birds until after the season opened. Then 
there was better duck shooting around 
our city than there was in our big pub- 
lic shooting grounds in Saginaw Bay. I 
am convinced if our gun clubs and or- 
ganized sportsmen would stock their 
shooting grounds, protect and feed their 
stock and keep all breeders clipped, as 
I do, they would have all kinds of 
cheap sport and tons of the very best 
food. I do not think, however, the kind 
of stock that is now being used for 
some of the big shoots will be very satis- 
factory as I doubt if such birds could get 
off the water and even if they could they 
are no comparison with the pure bred 
mallard which I believe will come into 
its own as soon as a few of our higher 
class sportsmen learn the difference. As 
Mr. Hoffman says of our advertisers, I 
say they should take a good look at a 
pure-bred bird, then eat a few and then 
they would realize the difference between 
a mallard and the near mallard or puddle 
duck. This difference can be seen more 
plainly if the young are allowed to fly at 
will to their marshes or creeks and get 
their natural feed. Don't worry, they will 
return if you care for them and you of- 
fer rewards for any one shooting out of 
season. Regarding the name advertisers 
should use there is only the tame mallard 
or puddle duck and pure bred wild mal- 
lards and at the present time the demand 
seems to be for the former, outside of 
a few breeders. When they get the prices 
of pure-bred mallards and black ducks 



12 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and compare them with near mallards 
they buy the latter if any. This used to 
be the same with pure-bred poultry and 
live stock but not so today ; the only 
man that can show any profit in poultry, 
live stock or ducks with feed prices as at 
present is the breeder that has the pure- 
bred stock that is always in demand at 
fair prices. For example, two years ago 
I could buy a thousand half-breed mal- 
lards in a day from small breeders in our 
state. Last week I had an order for 500 
to 1,000 mallards for a big dinner to be 
held in Detroit. I did not have the birds 
so I called up all the breeders I knew 
and I could only find 125 birds; this not 
being enough 1 had to turn the order 
down. So I ask where have the small 
breeders gone with their near mallards? 
Answer — out of business, the same as the 
larger breeders will do unless they im- 
prove their stock so they can get prices 
high enough to make them pay out. Bet- 
ter stock birds is what we want and more 
of them. The price will take care of it- 



self as soon as the real sportsmen learn 
what a pure-bred mallard is when com- 
pared to the overgrown half breed or even 
some not more than one-quarter mallard. 
Not only the difference in the swiftness 
of their flight but the quality of the meat 
after they are shot and most of all the 
satisfaction to the shooter and sports- 
men that they have not spent their time 
and money to kill a brace of barnyard 
ducks. After you have a stock of pure- 
bred birds for breeders and handle them 
as I do they will not cost more than 75 
per cent, as much to keep as it will to 
keep a grade that can not get home if they 
happen to fly over a fence. I have not 
given these facts to discourage any breed- 
er or dealer in half-breed mallards but 
to encourage improvement in stock birds ; 
and to cut down the cost of keeping a 
bird that is not able to fly to some nat- 
ural feeding place for a part of his feed. 
This act alone increases the flying value 
of the bird. 
Bad Axe, Mich. 



BLACK DUCK AND HOW TO RAISE THEM. 

By R. E. Bullock, 
Manager of Scarboro Beach Game Farm, Scarboro, Maine. 



We all know that up to the present 
time black duck have never been raised 
to a great extent. 

I have had experience in raising black 
duck ever since a boy, and I find that one 
has to be on the job for a wild black 
duck is surely wild. 

First, to pick a place to raise black 
duck "we will say that we have six 
pairs for breeders," a small pond not too 
deep with plenty of brush and under- 
growth along the shores. 

We will say that the pen is 100 feet 
long and 50 feet wide; one-inch mesh 
wire, the length of the pen being along 
the shore. Let the pen be out of the 
way of passers-by and in a quiet place ; 
the less you have to do around them 



the better off they will be. If, for in- 
stance, you visit a nest too often the 
old duck will surely leave it and if you 
try to enclose the old duck after she 
hatches with her young she will by brood- 
ing the little ones so close starve them 
to death. 

To raise black duck successfully they 
should be left entirely alone, make your 
pen and turn your birds in to it and 
leave them alone and they will do the 
rest. If you want the first eggs laid for 
setting, pick up once a week and leave 
two to three eggs in each nest. You will 
have a hard time to find the nest as a 
black duck's nest, if the old duck is on 
or off, is a pretty hard thing for the 
eye to catch. The best time to look up 



THE GAME BREEDER 



13 



a nest is in a rainstorm. A black duck 
will lay between 8 and 13 eggs the first 
litter, the next will be about 10, but only 
one litter will be laid if the eggs are not 
taken away. 

If you hatch the first of the eggs use 
a R. I. red hen for foster mother, not 
too heavy. Set on the ground in a wood- 
en box to shed the weather ; line the nest 
with sand and cover this with moss about 
one inch thick, and if the weather is 
very hot or dry soak moss in cold water, 
wring out by hand, place the eggs on it 
and let the hen go right on to it and 
shut her on. Of course if it is damp, 
rainy weather this does not need to be 
done. 

The hen should be let off every day 
to be fed and watered. 



The best food for young ducks at the 
start is dried bread crumbs soaked in 
milk and fed in a low pan or R. I. corn- 
meal scalded and made mushy by adding 
milk with plenty of clean sand mixed in 
and also plenty of good fresh water. 

But the best results, I think, come 
from letting the old duck hatch her 
brood in her own manner. 

I have nearly 100 breeders, all clear 
wild stock, trapped here in the state of 
Maine. Breeders should give these birds 
more attention. They are our own native 
birds and live with us the year round. 
The black duck is one of the best game 
birds in the duck line that flies. 

My holler is, raise black duck, don't 
let them go out like the wood-duck did ; 
go to it, brother breeders, while the go- 
ing is good. 



THE WEASEL. 

By M. J. Newhouse. 



The greatest enemy of the poultry or 
game farm is the weasel. While there 
are several quite distinct species, both as 
to size and color, their habits are iden- 
tical. The most common in the Eastern 
and Middle States are not much larger 
than the red squirrel and in summer are 
of a brownish red color with a white 
breast. Their small size makes them 
especially destructive, as they enter holes 
none too large for rats. Being extremely 
bloodthirsty and very courageous, thev 
are a terror to rats, hens, rabbits, par- 
tridges and game birds in general. While 
the blood of two hens would furnish all 
they require, either for sport or down- 
right cussedness, I have known of their 
killing twenty-seven hens in a single 
night. Passionately fond of blood, full 
of curiosity, extremely active and not 
suspicious, they are easily caught in 
steel traps. 

If the trapping is to be done inside the 
enclosure where game and little chicks 
are kept, I much prefer a small trap like 
the No. Newhouse Victor or Oneida 



Jump, taking especial pains to secure one 
with a spring stiff enough to hold a 
mink. 

An excellent set can be made by taking 
a wide board or an old door, leaning 
same against the building with base five 
or six inches away from building. This 
leaves ample room in which to set a trap 
at each end behind the door. The traps 
should be set six or eight inches from 
opening so as to be out of reach of a 
hen. Care should be taken to conceal 
the traps with litter, leaving it looking 
as old and natural as possible as by so 
doing you would lay claim to a passing 
mink. A handful of feathers between 
the traps makes an attractive lure. When 
the door is placed in position, the en- 
trance should be reduced by driving a 
stake or narrow board at the opening, 
leaving entrance only large enough for 
a mink to enter. Chickens will naturally 
run to cover at sight of a hawk and as 
further protection I take a short board 
four or five inches wide and set it edsre- 
wise, as shown in Fig. 1. A chicken 
may occasionally alight on this board, 



14 



THE GAME BREEDER 



but his body shuts out the light and he 
fears to enter the dark. 

The aforesaid method of catching 
weasels is also excellent for rats and if 
set under a shed can be utilized the year 
round and catch every newcomer. Where 
rats have become well established, but 
few can be caught before they get wise 
and a successful trapper will resort to 
many methods— in fact, it is a matter of 
wits against cunning before all are ex- 
terminated. 

Another good set is to take a box such 
as is used for canned goods, make a hole 
three inches or less in diameter in one 



Another good set is to take two six- 
inch tiles, placing them end to end, and 
set a trap in each and about six inches 
from the outer end, leaving opening just 
large enough for rats or weasels to enter. 
Oftentimes a trap placed in a pan of 
sawdust or chaff with meal or grain over 
the pan or trap, placing same in a box 
with cover off enough to allow a rat to 
enter is quite successful. For bait use 
bread, cheese, cooked meat or grain. All 
traps should be made to spring very 
easily and should also be concealed by 
some light litter. 

In setting a trap in a runway it should 




no. / 

end and about five inches from bottom 
of box, placing the trap about where the 
animal would naturally land after gain- 
ing an entrance. The cover to box 
should be removed every day to see that 
rat is not left long enough to scent up the 
box. The rat and trap are easily removed 
as the entrance hole is so small that the 
trap would not pass through ; conse- 
quently, the trap does not require fas- 
tening. 



be so placed that the animal would pass 
over lengthwise the jaws as shown in 
Fig. 2, turning the spring to the right so 
as not to oblige the animal to step on 
the spring. Never under any circum- 
stances place the trap so that jaws are 
at right angle with line the animal trav- 
els (see Fig. 3) as with short-legged 
animals the jaws when springing would 
strike the animal on the belly and often 
throw him out. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



GAME BREEDING AT CORNELL 
UNIVERSITY. 

Instruction in Wild Life Conservation 
and Game Breeding. 

Recognizing that we are at the begin- 
ning of knowledge of our plant and ani- 
mal resources, this new educational en- 
terprise takes for its scope the wild life 



of New York State and the conservation 
of all that is valuable in it. Beginning 
with the rearing of game birds and wa- 
terfowl, to replace in some measure these 
rapidly vanishing wild groups, it is ex- 
pected that this work will be extended 
to the conservation and care of fur-bear- 
ing animals, of valuable song birds, of 
wild flowers and useful native shrubbery, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15 



and of every wild thing that gives prom- 
ise of being used for the material or 
educational betterment of the people. All 
life was once wild life. Agriculture has 
grown by selection and care of the best 
that nature offers. This work is initiated 
in the firm belief that the sources of our 
benefits in nature are by no means ex- 
hausted. 

By recent act of the New York State 
Legislature, establishing a state game 
farm in connection with the New York 
State College of Agriculture at Cornell 
University and authorizing the college to 
undertake instruction in game breeding, 
opportunity has been made for obtaining 
practical instruction in wild life conser- 
vation. Under authority of this act, op- 
tions have been obtained on a farm near 
Ithaca, excellently located, and possessed 
of unusual natural advantages for the 
purposes for which it is to be employed. 
Breeding of ring-necked pheasants and 
mallard ducks will be carried on on this 
farm during the first season of its opera- 
tion, and in succeeding years the work will 
be gradually enlarged to include other spe- 
cies of useful game birds, fishes and other 
animals. Game breeding as a farm enter- 
prise will be studied, and students will 
be afforded ample opportunity to engage 
in practical game-breeding work on this 
farm. Wild species will be reared to de- 
termine their possibilities for increased 
food production and for utilization of 
waste lands in the State. Emphasis will 
be given to the correlation of game breed- 
ing and the different types of farming in 
New York State. 

Instruction in wild life conservation 
and in game breeding is offered by the 
college of agriculture in the following 
courses : 

1. The regular four year course in ag- 
riculture in which students may include 
among their elections the subjects that 
are fundamental to wild life conservation 
and game breeding. 

2. A short course of twelve weeks (to 
be followed by one or more seasons of 
work on a game farm) to give practical 
training in the technique of game breed- 
ing. 

3. A series of public lectures to be 



given by experts in the various lines of 
wild life conservation. 

Buying Eggs. 

One of our largest advertisers wrote 
not long ago that he had decided not to 
sell more eggs than he could produce on 
his farm ; that he would not purchase 
eggs in order to fill orders beyond the 
capacity of his place. 

There can be no doubt that the pur- 
chaser will get better results if he pur- 
chases eggs directly from a reputable 
game farmer or preserve owner who ad- 
vertises in The Game Breeder than he 
will if he buys from a broker. A large 
percentage of the controversies handled 
by the game guild are due to> transactions 
in eggs. A recent case which was de- 
cided against a dealer in eggs and which 
terminated his right to advertise in The 
Game Breeder disclosed the fact that he 
had taken an order for eggs and had pur- 
chased the eggs from a dealer in another 
state ; that he, in turn, had purchased the 
eggs from another dealer who he found 
later had undesirable stock. 

The safe way for those who wish to 
purchase eggs is to buy them from our 
advertisers who produce them on their 
premises. In the future we will not ac- 
cept advertisements from brokers since 
we believe eggs should be shipped 
promptly from those who produce them. 

Losses Due to Transportation. 

We are often surprised at the excel- 
lent reports of the successful hatching 
of eggs purchased at a distance from the 
rearing field. In a clever little rearers' 
manual issued by an English firm the 
writer says, "No matter how perfect 
eggs may be when dispatched, and how 
carefully they may be packed after the 
most approved principles, the shaking 
they receive in transit is liable to render 
a certain percentage sterile." When 
game breeding was in its infancy in 
America we sent to England for a lot of 
wild duck eggs, and, although we were 
not prepared to handle them properly 
upon arrival, and we sent some to i an 
incubator company to have them hatched, 
the results indicated that eggs can be 



16 



THE GAME BREEDER 



shipped long distances and that a good 
percentage can be hatched. 

Removing Eggs from the Nests of 
Game Birds. 

The breeder should be careful how he 
visits and removes eggs from the nests — 
especially from the nests of wild breeding 
birds. He should wait until the hen 
leaves the nest of her own accord and, 
of course, he should leave an egg or two. 
Infertile eggs disinfected by boiling in 
lime water make excellent nest eggs and 
if a few of these are marked and left 
in the nest the fertile eggs can be re- 
moved and hatched under hens. 

Sham Eggs. 

It is well known that domestic hens 
will lay to nest eggs. We read a story 
recently about a snake that mistook and 
swallowed a door-knob, used as a nest 

It is said that where artificial nests 
are made on the English preserves and 
sham eggs are placed in them the birds 
lay freely to them. By this means the 
quick and easy collection of the required 
number of early eggs is assured and the 
nests may be located in safe situations. 

There are tremendous losses in Amer- 
ica due to the destruction of nests by the 
plow and later by the mowing and reap- 
ing machines. If strips of grass weeds 
and briars be left at the sides of the 
fields and suitable nests be made in which 
sham eggs are placed we believe many 
prairie grouse and quail can be induced to 
nest in safe places and the result will 
be fine covies in the stubbles in the 
autumn. 

Of course no farmer can be expected 
to attend to such matters if the only in- 
ducement is the offer of the state to li- 
cense trespassers to shoot up his birds 
after he produces them. We have some 
farmers who are taking an interest in pro- 
ducing game, believing as we do that it 
will not be long before quail and grouse 
can be sold as freely as pheasants, wild 
ducks and wild turkeys and their eggs 
now are sold by those who produce them. 
The grouse and quail undoubtedly are 
worth something as insect destroyers but 



they will be worth more even in this 
capacity when they are kept profitably 
plentiful. 

Importance of Dusting Places. 

Game birds and doves often are seen 
in the roads where they go to dust them- 
selves and possibly to find grit. Dur- 
ing the incubation period dusting is quite 
important and necessary for the hens to 
free themselves from lice. In England 
game birds are said to often select nest- 
ing sites near roads on account of the 
facility offered for the dusting. It is 
quite an easy matter to make a good 
dusting place near a nesting place and if 
it be made near or in a briar patch the 
bird will be safe from enemies when 
taking its dust bath. Spading up a small 
area and adding a little sand is all that 
is necessary to make a good dusting 
place and it has been well suggested that 
a little insect powder in the dust bath is 
desirable. Grit placed near the nests, 
when found, and a little seasonable food 
will tend to make the nesting place at- 
tractive and to prevent the nesting birds 
from wandering into dangerous places. 
If there are briars near the nest by all 
means leave them standing and a few 1 
briars can be cut and placed about nests 
in exposed situations. 

Remember that old traps sprung so as 
not to catch the setting bird when placed 
near a nest will tend to keep the fox 
away. 

Cat briars and other briars cut and 
laid in a broad circle should tend to keep 
snakes from eating eggs and ground nest- 
ing birds. We hope some of our readers 
who own grouse in a good snake country 
will experiment and report. ' 

Quail and Grouse Breeding. 

We hope many of our readers will 
make experiments this year with quail 
and prairie grouse. If they will leave 
suitable nesting sites at the sides of the 
fields when the fields are to be plowed 
and take the trouble to place sham eggs 
in nests made in the grass and weeds we 
are confident they can induce grouse and 
quail to lay their eggs in safe places. 
An old stump surrounded by briars or 



THE GAME BREEDER 



17 



a few rails laid to make a panel or two 
of an old-fashioned rail fence will make 
very attractive nesting sites ; and weeds 
and briars should be left as cover and 
food. A little clover, lettuce, buckwheat 
and sunflowers will make the nesting site 
very attractive and weeds, grass and 
briars will save the birds from many nat- 
ural enemies. 

The state game officers, we are quite 
sure, will prefer to see the sportsmen 
and farmers work together and produce 
"more game" to seeing the game protec- 
tionists (who gather vast funds in order 
to save the game) succeed in putting our 
best game birds on the song-bird list. 
In some states the laws now permit the 
profitable production of quail and grouse 
and even in states where these birds have 
been placed on the song-bird list the laws 
quickly can be amended so as to favor 
the producers provided they will show 
that they have game. 

No good reason can be assigned why 
the laws should say you can produce 
pheasants and some species of ducks but 
you must not produce birds which most 
need the breeders' attention and which 
will be far more profitable than pheas- 
ants and ducks. 

We expect soon to have many adver- 
tisements of grouse and quail and the 
eggs of these birds. 

Big Demand for Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. 

Mr. Dusette of Bad Ax, Michigan, 
writes to change his advertisement, strik- 
ing out the offer of mallards and black 
ducks. He says he has noticed there is 
a very big demand for pure-bred wild 
ducks and their eggs and that those who 
at one time were satisfied with near mal- 
lards now want only pure-bred stock. 

Mr. R. A. Chiles of Mt. Sterling, Ken- 
tucky, also reports an increasing demand 
for pure-bred wild ducks and says they 
command much better prices than the 
semi-domestic birds and their eggs do. 

Black Ducks. 

Mr. Bullock of the Scarboro Beach 
game farm, the largest game farm in New 
England, writes that he secured permits 
to trap a lot of black ducks which were 



suffering from climate. The birds quick- 
ly recovered and with these added to 
his flock he believes he now has the larg- 
est flock of pure-bred wild black ducks 
on any game farm. His advertisement 
of eggs appears on another page. We 
oredict that all of the game farmers who 
have black ducks will quickly sell all of 
the eggs they are willing to part with. 
The same is true of the dealers in pure- 
.bred wild mallards. 

Bad Luck With Heath Hens. 

Mr. Llewellyn Legge, chief of the Divi- 
sion of Fish and Game, stated that all of 
the heath hens placed on the New York 
State Game Farm at Shoreham, Long 
Island, in a three-acre enclosure of scrub- 
oak, had died, apparently having "gone 
light." The birds were sent by the Massa- 
chusetts Commissioners on Fisheries and 
Game from the heath hen reservation at 
Martha's Vineyard, where the species it 
may be is making its last stand. A simi- 
lar consignment was sent to Dr. J. C. 
Phillips at Wenham, Mass., in the hope 
that a new breeding colony might be 
started. Some of the birds sent Dr. Phil- 
lips died, although the experiment at his 
place was not as unfortunate as that at 
Shoreham. 

As. Dr. Phillips has entered the service 
of the United States, he has sent his birds 
to Mr. Joshua Crane, who has placed 
them on his game preserve on No-Man's 
Land. 

As stated in a recent issue of the 5m/- 
letin, the heath hen, which had increased 
to such an extent as to seem to justify 
hopes that the species would be saved, 
is again gravely threatened, owing to a 
disastrous fire which swept its haunts on 
Martha's Vineyard. — Sportsman's Re- 
view. 

Quail Breeding. 

We hope many of our members will 
breed quail this year for sport and for 
profit. Quail will lay many eggs if they 
are paired arbitrarily and quail eggs 
have been successfully hatched under 
bantam and light weight hens. If the 
hen be permitted to run with the young 
birds in gardens, hedged with briars, and 
containing brush heaps and other covers, 



18 



THE GAME BREEDER 



many quail can be produced. Quail which 
-have hatched broods in wire enclosures 
also should be permitted to take their 
young' into small gardens especially 
planted for them. 

All garden vegetables furnish insect food 
and sweet corn furnishes shade. The gar- 
den weeds furnish many seeds, and lettuce 
is especially attractive. See that the garden 
has plenty of briars. It is an excellent 
plan to make the garden adjoining berry 
patches and to plant hedges of black- 
berries, raspberries and currants, and 
these may well be bordered with clover 
grass, sunflowers, etc. At very small ex- 
pense a garden can be made for the 
quails which will be safe and attractive. 
One or more dusting places should be 
spaded up, and if sand and ashes con- 
taining some insect powder be added to 
the dust bath the quail will use it and 
not be induced to go to the roads or other 
exposed places for the dust bath. Briars 
beside or surrounding the dusting place 
will make it safe, and some small grit 
should be distributed where the birds 
easily can find it. 

Quail eggs will sell for more than 
pheasants' eggs and the demand for quail 
far exceeds the supply. 

Rice Damage by Ducks. 

There has been much newspaper pub- 
licity given to the depredations of ducks 
in the rice fields of the Sacramento Val- 
ley. It appears that some of this pub- 
licity has been the work of selfish hunters 
desiring to hunt ducks before the'season 
opens. Proof of this is apparent in the 
fact that most rice growers wijl not 
allow duck hunters in their fields. On 
the other hand, it appears that some 
growers have received severe loss from 
ducks. Certain it is, also, that many of 
the ducks shot this season had their crops 
filled with rice. The Fish and Game 
Commission realizes that the problem of 
protecting the rice fields in the Sacra- 
mento Valley is a serious one and it is 
anxious to reach a solution fair to both 
the grower and the hunter. Especially 
is it desirable to rightly settle the con- 
troversy, owing to the food situation. 
Consequently, the Commission plans to 



hold in the near future a conference with 
rice growers to obtain their point O'f view. 
Furthermore, during the fall of 1918, a 
special investigation will be made in those 
districts where depredations are reported. 

Fireworks Used to Frighten Birds in 
Rice Fields. 

Some experiments to determine the ef- 
fectiveness of fireworks in frightening 
t birds from rice fields have recently been 
made in the Sacramento Valley. The 
location selected was on the Gingg and 
Cooper ranch, four miles west of Live 
Oak, where birds did considerable dam- 
age last year. 

In talking with Mr. Cooper in Septem- 
ber regarding co-operation by the Fish 
and Game Commission* in order to find 
a remedy, and knowing the effect of 
black powder, which is both loud and 
smoky, we suggested to him the use of 
some form of loud explosive that would 
carry fire and smoke. We secured sev- 
eral samples of rockets and .bombs from 
San Francisco and commenced the exper- 
iment by setting some of them off after 
dark. However, the birds were still 
numerous on the rice fields at daylight in 
the morning. We then fired more bombs 
and still more while the birds were in 
the air. To say that the ducks were 
demoralized does not convey an idea of 
how much they were frightened. 

Mr. Cooper was so impressed with the 
effectiveness of the bombs that he sent 
for four dozen of the kind selected, at 
five dollars per dozen. After using half 
of this number night and morning there 
was not a bird of any kind to be found 
on his fields. In a few days some mud- 
hens and ducks returned, presumably 
new ones. He then used the 'balance of 
the four dozen effectively, and sent for 
five dozen more for emergency use. On 
Sept. 26 Mr. Cooper stated to us that 
he had had no occasion to use or open 
the last five dozen, as at that time there 
was not a bird on his fields and he had 
not suffered a particle of injury. Judg- 
ing from this, the experiment may be said 
to have been a success. 

Conditions on Mr. Cooper's fields made 
it harder to protect them from the birds 
than any other fields in the district, the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



19 



water being deeper in spots, which in- 
duces the birds to congregate there. Of 
course, when' the birds were driven from 
the Gingg and Cooper grounds, some of 
the other growers certainly suffered 
from the addition of these birds. This 
only demonstrates that entire relief for 
all growers can only be had through the 
co-operation of all the growers. Each 
can protect his fields, but the one who 
does not will be the greatest sufferer. 

We are certain that the experiment 
referred to above is the only logical rem- 
edy, although many other methods have 
been suggested. Some rice growers, and 
many who are not growers (and, by the 
way, the last-named class is the loudest 
in its complaints) have advocated an 
earlier open season for ducks. This posi- 
tively will not remedy the situation. It 
might, if every one would kill blackbirds 
and mudhens, as well as ducks, but they 
want to kill ducks only, as the other birds 
are not considered good eating. So by 
killing ducks only, the worst menace 
would still remain. Again : The rice 
grower will not permit trespassing on his 
fields, as the hunter will do more damage 
at this time than the birds. Many of 
the rice farms are posted with signs pro- 
hibiting shooting and trespassing. Fur- 
ther, if the season was opened earlier 
than at present, a large number of club 
members would be out shooting at the 
club grounds, which are not on the rice 
fields, but on open water and tule marsh 
lands adjacent thereto. Thus the ducks 
would be driven from the club and open 
shooting grounds back to the rice fields, 
where the rice farmer does not permit 
trespassing while the rice is growing. 
Consequently, the club members would 
be the only ones benefited by an early sea- 
son, while the rice would suffer more 
than at present. 

Before night shooting was prohibited, 
and before the use of smokeless powder, 
some of the best duck shooting ponds 
have been spoiled by shooting after dark 
and by using black powder. Any duck 
hunter of long experience can testify to 
this. Ducks will not return to a pond 
that has been shot on at night. The idea 
of using bombs came from this experi- 
ment. Smokeless powder is used in fixed 



ammunition because it does not frighten 
game, for. it makes very little noise and 
smoke. The use of smokeless powder 
to scare ducks is money wasted. This 
form of ammunition is made to kill, not 
to frighten, but it has been used by the 
rice grower and he receives no relief ex- 
cept from the bird he kills. 

Although the experiments above out- 
lined were tried on a limited area only, 
they demonstrated that there is a feas- 
ible method of protecting crops from the 
depredations of birds. 

We are sure that if the rice growers 
themselves will co-operate, a plan of de- 
fense can be worked out as suggested, 
which will make it unnecessary to 
threaten the extermination of the wild 
duck without obtaining relief from the 
other birds which are the worse menace. 
But the growers should eliminate the 
voice of the man who is not a rice farmer 
and who only takes up the cry for the 
purpose of slaughter. He does not kill 
mudhens or blackbirds, because he does 
not eat them and cannot sell them. — 
George Neale in California Fish and 
Game. 

Safe to Purchase From Our 
Advertisers. 

From present indications it seems like- 
ly that all of our eastern advertisers will 
have more orders for eggs than they can 
fill. We have records of eggs shipped 
from the Pacific states which were highly 
satisfactory and we also have records of 
thousands of eggs sent by our readers to 
the western states. It is highly impor- 
tant, however, that eggs should be packed 
and shipped properly and we believe the 
advertisers in The Game Breeder under- 
stand their business. Our readers will 
do well to purchase eggs directly from 
those who produce them and advertise 
them in The Game Breeder and if they 
are not satisfied with the result the game 
guild will investigate any transaction 
when a complaint is filed stating that the 
purchase was made on account of an ad- 
vertisement in the magazine. 

The game conservation society insists 
upon fair dealing; and the right to use 
The Game Breeder for advertising pur- 
poses — a valuable right — will be denied 



20 



THE GAME BREEDER 



in all cases where the guild decides the 
advertiser has not lived up to the stand- 
ard. People do not like it when we cancel 
their membership and return the dollar 
paid to receive the publication and the 
check sent for an advertisement. For- 
tunately this does not happen often, but 
our readers can rest assured that the 
best place to purchase stock and eggs 
is from those who are interested in the 
more game movement and have the right 
to use The Game Breeder. 

All of our advertisers report excellent 
results from their advertisements in The 
Game Breeder. Often they write to dis- 
continue the advertising because they can 
not fill their orders and do not like to 
answer a big mail. 

The reason why the advertising pro- 
duces such results is that the magazine 
goes to practically all of the clubs and 
preserve owners, state game officers, 
game farmers and in fact every one like- 
ly to purchase. We are continually help- 
ing to start new places and we have a 
large number of people who are just 
starting big and small places. The sane 
and in fact the only way to reach the 
new customers is through the columns 
of The Game Breeder. Since our rates 
for game advertisements are very low, the 
object of the magazine being to quickly 
build up the new industry, it will cer- 
tainly pay all of our breeders who have 
not done so to try an advertisement in 
the magazine. By thus benefitting your- 
self remember you are helping the cause 
and helping to make the only paper pub- 
lished in your interest better and more 
influential as it should be made. 



use of a dog in hunting the game birds, 
claiming it gives the hunter too great an 
advantage, etc. The writers are simply 
ignorant; probably never saw a dog 
work; know almost nothing of shooting 
on the wing. It can not be otherwise. 
No sane man with knowledge of wing 
shooting over dogs can object unless he is 
a fanatic. And why these writers are 
given space in sportsmen's papers to con- 
demn their fellows is one of the things 
which mystify me. Yet the editors are 
often fanatics. I believe one of our 
friends could not be induced to shoot a 
game bird or catch a game fish. I never 
could get him to come up to Sidney for 
choice woodcock and quail shooting. Ob- 
jects to taking a life he can not restore, 
and similar bosh, possibly. His columns 
were far freer to fanatics than to sports- 
men. 

Sportsmen are between the devil and 
the deep blue sea, fanatics who oppose all 
killing, even to poultry, on one side, and 
game commissioners, wardens and their 
especial pets, the hoodlums who want free 
shooting, more properly free trespassing, 
on the other. 

General VVingate's article is all right. 
I used to know a farmer who trapped 
quail in early winter to liberate next 
spring; he was a sportsman as well as 
a farmer or would never have done so. 
I have kept quail in a cage from De- 
cember to May. They do well in close 
confinement and on grain feed. All over 
the north quail should be trapped every 
fall and liberated the next spring, but 
not for trespassers. 



Increase of Fanatics. 

By P. R. Robeson. 

We have been developing quite a per- 
centage of fanatics in recent years who 
are strongly opposed to their fellow men 
(and women) having any pleasures the 
fanatics do not indulge in. These pleas- 
ures run all the way from cigarettes and 
beer to Sunday baseball, dancing and sex- 
ing, and include shooting and angling dis^- 
tinctly for sport. Have you not noticed 
that writers in the so-called sportsmen's 
papers and magazines even condemn the 



Gulls as Submarine Detectors. 

Dr. A. D. Pentz, Jr., of New Brigh- 
ton, Staten Island, has developed a plan 
for using gulls to disclose the presence 
of submarines. He suggests that hoppers 
fifty-four inches long be made of sheet 
steel and bolted to the tops of submarines, 
to be filled with chopped fish which may 
be released from time to time by means 
of a crank operated inside the vessel. 

In the way gulls will be taught to asso- 
ciate submarines with food and will 
gather clamorously over any submarine 
that may appear in the waters. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



21 



The scheme has the indorsement of the 
National Association of Audubon Socie- 
ties and is receiving serious attention 
from the United States naval authorities. 



Aviators Study Birds. 

Washington, D. C, March 9. — Despite 
the strenuous and engrossing character 
of their occupation, a few aviators have 
found opportunity to note the height of 
flight of various migrating birds. 

Thus from French soldiers of the air 
it is learned that swallows have been ob- 
served to maintain an average altitude of 
700 yards and wild ducks one of 1,800 
yards, while green plover have been seen 
at a height of 2,150 yards. 

Incidentally it may be mentioned that 
the ducks were moving at a speed of 65^2 
miles an hour when flying upward and 
69 miles an hour when flying horizontally. 

From another aviator it is learned that 
when he was flying at 9,500 feet he saw 
swallows high above him. 

And another, whose observations were 
made at a height of 6,000 feet during a 
heavy bombardment "with anti-aircraft 
shells bursting in all directions," states 
that he observed 200 golden plover, per- 
haps driven higher than usual by the fact 
that the vicinity was "an unpleasant belt 
to cross." — Maine Woods. 



More Sentiment. 

We offer the suggestion that there be 
founded the "Order of the Double- 
Cross," membership therein to be restrict- 
ed to '"birds" of the genus "clay pigeon," 
for it is "theirs not to reason why ; theirs 
but to do and die." 

Now this doin' and diein', while pri- 
marily for the pleasure of some half-mil- 
lion trapshooters, incidentally, lets gun- 
ners get a perfect natural desire to shoot 
out of their systems without making the 
feathered creatures of wood and field vic- 
tims of the skill of the shooters. 

Aside from sentimental considerations, 
the protection of bird life is an economic 
question of greater importance than is 
generally realized. 

Unfortunately foir the country and 
equally so for the clay pigeon, it is not 
an insectivorous "bird" nor is it a song- 



ster, at least not so you would notice it. 
But, as we have intimated the "birdie" 
faces fusillades of shotgun fire with utter 
abandon ; a willing sacrifice to man's de- 
sire to demonstrate his prowess as a 
marksman. 

In flocks of millions, the "clay bird" 
challenges the shooter to pit his skill 
against the speed of the target and its 
predilection to be where the shot is not 
and leaves the gunman the poor consola- 
tion- of having punched a hole in the at- 
mosphere at a cost of several cents per 
punch. 

True, many trapshooters continue, in 
season, to follow the legitimate and royal 
sport of hunting, but a sportsman of the 
type that will shoot fifty to one hundred 
shells every Saturday throughout the 
year, just for the joy of shooting, is not 
the withered-souled and greedy-eyed in- 
dividual who would "hog" all the game 
of a county during both "open" and 
"closed" seasons. And, too, the trap- 
shooter, believing in sport for sport's 
sake, would sic a game warden on the 
aforesaid g. i. and w. s. individual the 
minute he was caught with the goods. 

Other hunters have forsaken field 
shooting for "the patriotic sport," finding 
in the inanimate-target game a satisfying 
substitute, without combats with bramble 
bushes, wading of swamps or marshes 
and a spell of "rheumatiz" that lasts from 
the end of one hunting season til just be- 
fore the opening of the next. — Maine 
Woods. 

1 We are by no means opposed to trap shoot- 
ing, all of our game breeding associations and 
shoots have traps for a diversion and for 
practice during the summer. We hope our 
game also can be saved from extinction and 
the great naturalist, Darwin, tells us the best 
way to keep game abundant is to encourage 
shooting as a means to induce production. — 
Editor.] 



Breeding Marketable Game. 

Lovers of wild life and devotees of 
the chase are now at odds over the ques- 
tion of Federal game laws. Violent pro- 
test has been made against the winter 
slaughter of migratory birds in Louisiana, 
and the hunters of the South have been 
asked how they would regard the collect- 

(Continued on page 25.) 



22 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Edited by D WIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, APRIL, 1918. 



TERMS: 
10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, f 1.25. ' 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 

Telephone, Beekman 3G85. 



KEEP THE MONEY AT HOME. 

Why should we send many thousands 
of dollars to Mexico for small quail when 
bigger and better birds can be produced 
on the western farms ? 

The best state game officers now are 
aware that it is far better to encourage 
grouse and quail ranches, where thou- 
sands of birds can be produced and sold, 
than it is to have these birds placed on 
the song-bird list by people in New York 
who raise thousands of dollars annually 
to secure restrictive laws in other states. 
People are permitted and invited to cre- 
ate cattle and sheep ranches and great 
wheat and other grain farms, and it is 
well known that such industry often re- 
sults in the extermination of the game 
birds on vast areas. A few game ranches 
and a few game preserves in any region 
soon will improve the shooting on vast 
areas since when game is made and kept 
plentiful on any place it overflows and 
restocks the surrounding country. 

The state game officer who wishes to 
purchase quiail should not be obliged 
to send vast sums of money to Mexico. 
He should send it to American game 
farmers who can produce plenty:of game 
as soon as it is legal to do! so. 

The big wheat farms in the west where 
there are few or no game birds today 
easily can be made to produce all the 
game necessary to supply state depart- 



ments, shooting clubs and commercial 
breeders. 

Sport will fare better in states where 
game is made abundant than in states 
where it is placed on the song-bird list. 
♦ 

TWO REQUESTS. 

We would like to have our readers sug- 
gest what they would like to see in The 
Game Breeder. The promptness with 
which subscriptions are renewed, and 
the interest which readers take when we 
ask them to send us new subscribers, 
indicate that the matter we furnish inter- 
ests them, but we are well aware that 
The Game Breeder can be made more 
interesting and more useful and instruc- 
tive. We are glad to see an end to the 
arresting of people for having birds in 
their possession and for other crimes 
which should not occur on game farms. 
Common sense has made some rapid 
strides, and we believe it will not be 
necessary for us to devote much space in 
the future to the defense of food pro- 
ducers or to controversial matters. Our 
inclination is to have more practical ar- 
ticles about game breeding, its pleasures 
and profits, and we hope our readers will 
not only send us short letters giving their 
experience, but that also they will tell us 
what they want to see published. We 
know where to go after almost any in- 
formation about any subject relating to 
game breeding, and we regard it as the 
duty of an editor to select and gather the 
material the readers want. So please 
write to us. 

Request No. 2. 
The postage of the Conservation So- 
ciety and Game Breeder letters is now 3 
cents instead of 2, as you all -know. The 
printing costs more than it did. The 
paper ditto. Everything costs more, but 
we wish to keep the price for subscribing 
members at $1 and guild members at $2, 
as heretofore, and at the same time to 
make the magazine better and give more 
for the money. Our guild cases, com- 
plaints for unfair dealing, etc., Cost us 
more to handle than we receive from 
guild members. In some cases we have 
saved at member hundreds of dollars, and 
it is worth something to have the cor- 
respondence service which the guild fur- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



23 



nishes on any subject. Our request is 
that our readers send names of people 
who should be interested in the work of 
the society as often as they occur to them. 
Also that all those who have anything to 
sell place at least a small advertisement 
in The Game Breeder. It will surely re- 
sult in a good mail, a desirable acquaint- 
ance, and the sale of the game, eggs or 
whatever is advertised. You can help 
make the paper more interesting by ad- 
vertising in it. One of our readers 
informed the editor that the most inter- 
esting part of the magazine was the ad- 
vertising pages. 



A QUAIL AND GROUSE YEAR. 

The pheasants and some species of 
wild ducks are now reared in big numbers 
at so many places that all who wish to 
have pheasants and ducks and their eggs 
for breeding purposes can procure them 
easily by writing to our advertisers. In 
a few years the dealers will be abun- 
dantly supplied and these foods will be- 
come common on many tables. 

The work of the society this year will 
largely be devoted to the development of 
quail and grouse breeding for sport and 
for profit and we hope many members of 
the society who have pheasants and ducks 
will take up quail and grouse breeding 
and be prepared to furnish quail and 
grouse eggs for breeding purposes. We 
are quite sure that this industry will be 
fully as profitable and possibly more so 
than pheasant and duck breeding are. 
There certainly is a big demand for quail 
and breeders need have no fear of sell- 
ing all the quail and grouse and the eggs 
they can produce. 

When the birds and the eggs secured 
from stock birds are acquired by pur- 
chase they undoubtedly are the property 
of the producer and we do not believe 
intelligent State officers will make any 
objection to the sale of live game for 
breeding purposes, when it has been pro- 
duced by industry. If they do we be- 
lieve the courts will set them straight 
since the tendency of the decisions is in 
the direction of common sense which dis- 
tinguishes between game produced and 
owned by breeders and the rare wild 



game said to be owned by the State. 

If many of our members will give some 
of their attention to quail breeding we 
can make 1918 a big quail year. The ex- 
periments made by the society will set 
the pace for quail production, just as the 
experiments with ducks and pheasants at 
our Game Breeding Association preserve 
set the pace for duck and pheasant breed- 
ing. 

■ ♦ 

THE WEASEL. 

The article in this number on the 
weasel is timely and authoritative. The 
weasel is certainly one of the worst ene- 
mies of the game breeder and hunts both 
game and eggs wantonly. We published 
some time ago an account of the killing 
of 57 hens in one night by a weasel in 
Iowa. It seems the weasel was protected 
by law and a game warden arrested the 
farmer for killing the weasel. He elected 
to go to jail and declined to pay any fine. 
Today hundreds of people are breeding 
game in Iowa. Although a $2.00 license 
is provided by law many who were in 
the business before the license law was 
enacted have neglected to take out a 
license and we are told continue their 
food producing industry without police 
interference. This is highly creditable 
to the game officers of Iowa. The most 
they should do would be to notify the 
breeders to pay the $2.00 fine, but, no 
doubt, the law soon will be amended so 
that no payment is required from food 

producers. 

• 

More Trout. 

The Rome, N. Y., Fish and Game Pro- 
tective Association is enlarging its trout 
nursery. It has done so before and other 
associations have similarly found their 
work growing. But that is not the sig- 
nificant fact about the Rome nursery. The 
feature that stands out in Rome above 
every other is that several of the big 
manufacturing companies in Rome have 
seen so clearly the social and economic 
value of better fishing to their community, 
and incidentally to their own business, 
that they have provided the funds for 
the enlargement. 

Fish and game associations have long 
raised money for their work in various 



24 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ways, chief among them being dues and 
contributions from sportsmen. This is 
the first instance that we know of where 
the work has been made such a commu- 
nity undertaking as in Rome. Last year 
200,000 trout fry supplied by the Conser- 
vation Commission and the bureau of 
fisheries were raised by the association 
to fingerling size. Next year the number 
is expected to be doubled. What this 
means to Rome as a community can never 
be stated simply in terms of fish caught, 
even though the trout fishing there is 
probably better than that in any other 
well settled portion of the State. 

Community playgrounds have become 
a universal public institution, publicly 
supported. Rome is showing the entire 
State how the streams of any suitable 
locality may be made one of the most 
profitable and appealing of playgrounds. 

The action at Rome is but a start. As- 
sociations in other places will emulate 
it. As the Conservation Commission 
stated in the annual report for 1915, 
"through all of these organizations runs 
the spirit of social service. Their con- 
duct entails much work and' sacrifice 
upon their officers and guiding minds. 
That this work is faithfully and consist- 
ently performed and supported as uni- 
versally as it is, but another proof of the 
social value of conservation — proof that 
places it on a plane with education, child 
welfare work, the labor movement, the 
various campaigns for public health, and 
every other activity for social better- 
ment. Conservation, no less than those 
other movements, has its social workers 
in all parts of the State, who understand 
and are striving earnestly for the attain- 
ment of its ideals." — Conservationist. 



FISH AND GAME LAW CHANGES 

Mississippi Rejects Commission ; 

Nevada Establishes Department. 

Of several radical changes made in the 
administration of the laws probably the 
most important is the establishment of 
a department of game and fish in Ne- 
vada. 

In Illinois the Game and Fish Com- 
mission, established in 1915, was abol- 
ished and the work placed under the 



Department of Agriculture with a chief 
game and fish warden in direct charge. 

In Maine a single Commissioner of 
Inland Fisheries and Game has been 
substituted for the commission of three 
members which has been in charge of 
the work since 1899. 

In Mississippi the law enacted last 
year creating the department of game 
and fish and placing the work in charge 
of a commissioner was submitted to the 
voters under a referendum petition and 
rejected at the general election in No- 
vember, 1916, thus leaving the State 
without any general officer in charge of 
game matters. 

In New Jersey the Board of Fish and 
Game Commissioners has been increased 
from four to seven members. 

In Pennsylvania the provision requir- 
ing game protectors to enforce the fish 
and forestry laws, as well as the game 
laws, was strengthened and made more 
explicit. 

The salary of the Commissioner of In- 
land Fisheries and Game in Maine was 
increased to $2,500, that of the State 
Warden of South Dakota to $2,400, and 
that of the chief protector of New York 
to $5,000 per annum. 

In Florida the county warden system 
was reestablished in conformity with the 
decision declaring the law of 1915 un- 
constitutional. 

Preparedness. 

The Game Conservation Society an- 
nounced that it would supply game to 
the hospitals during the war. It is the 
only society equipped to undertake this 
work. The New York conservation com- 
missioner, in his annual report, offers to 
furnish mineral water to the surgeon 
general of the United States. It seems 
highly proper if we furnish the birds 
that the State should furnish the drinks. 
Our readers own the game farms and 
"shoots" and the State owns the springs 
at Saratoga. 

We shall be glad to have game breed- 
ers write what they think of our plan to 
keep the hospitals full of game. Any 
who are willing to offer game for this 
purpose are asked to write promptly, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



25 



stating what they will give. Our postage 
on this "stunt ' will be tremendous, so we 
hope many will write at once, stating 
about what they can give. We wish to 
make up a preliminary estimate as soon 
as possible. Let us show the opposition 
what game breeding has accomplished 
and what the breeders can do. 



Cat Disdains Shells, Dog Shows 
Terror. 

The Daily News correspondent at 
Antwerp quotes a refugee from Alost, 
when the German attack was at its 
height, as follows: 

"A dog and a cat followed us down 
the street and as the shells burst the dog 
went dodging about from one side of the 
road to the other, but the cat never 
turned a hair. It minced along behind 
us, seemingly unafraid. 

"The men and the dog made me ner- 
vous, but the cat was reassuring. Fur- 
ther down the whistle of shells followed 
us again, trying to pick up the Belgian 
retreat ; but before the boom came that 
time I managed to break in the door of 
a shop and get inside. 

"It is surprising what one will do in 
emergencies like that. Fortunately for 
the cat and dog it was a butcher's shop, 
and I thought they might as well have 
some meat as the Germans, so I handed 
them down a leg of veal and left them 

eating it when I came out." 

♦ 

OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

Snakelets. 

The following short stories about 
snakes, sent to the editorial department, 
division of publications of the Game 
Conservation Society, have been referred 
to the vermin committee of the Game 
Guild. 

Transcripts were ordered sent to Dr. 
Allen S. Williams, president of the Snake 
Society, for special study and report. — 
Editor. 

Snake Uses False Teeth. 

Ludio, Cal., Oct. 27.— While Cynthia Stone, 

spinster, was hauling a bucket of water out of 

her deep well her false teeth fell in. They 

were appropriated by an old and toothless 



water snake which, though somewhat of a pet, 
has learned how to use the teeth and is gnaw- 
ing away the wall of the well, letting the 
water leak away into the sand. Workmen are 
afraid to give it battle. 

"The Parson Told the Sexton and the 
Sexton Tolled the Bell." 

Laurel, Del., Oct. 27. — A six-foot blacksnake 
fell from the belfry of the Riverton (Md.) 
Methodist Church onto the shoulders of Sex- 
ton Benjamin F. Kennerly, while the latter 
was ringing the bell. After a lively chase the 
snake was cornered in the church auditorium 
and killed. It evidently had made its home in 
the belfry and fed on birds which roost there. 



All persons intending to buy game 
should place their orders with those who 
advertise in The Game Breeder and thus 
support those who support their publi- 
cation. 

• 

(Continued from page 21.) 
ing and storing of wild fowl eggs in the 
North for food purposes. There should 
be some common ground for settlement 
which would result in the protection of 
game in all its forms. Incidental to the 
main purpose, each State should adopt 
the plan of licensing the breeding and 
sale of now protected game. Already 
many thousand pheasants and mallard 
ducks are being produced annually by 
game farmers, who find a minimum of 
trouble in raising these birds. The plan 
is delightfully simole. Serially numbered 
leg tags are issued to producers to be at- 
tached to slaughtered birds sent to the 
market, a record to be kept of the sale 
in a book open to the inspection of the 
State Fish and Game Commissioner and 
his deputies. In this way the food sup- 
ply can be added to in large quantities 
and delicious tit-bits placed in reach of 
the ordinary purse. Under present con- 
ditions there is no incentive to propagate 
these birds which are left to precarious 
chance. If it were now permitted to raise 
quail for the market the producers would 
have seen to it that the rigorous winter 
did not kill most of the coveys, as was 
the case in Ohio during the past cold sea- 
son. Through the licensing system the 
desires of both hunter and bird lover can 
be gratified and the stock of game in- 
creased. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



26 



THE GAME BREEDER 




PENCES 
POR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars aud a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. H. DOWNS 

39 CORTLANDT STREET NEW YORK CITY, N. Y- 



RIV£R LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE: CO., N. Y. 

Pheasant and Mallard Eggs for Spring delivery from 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

Mv birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member- American Game Breeders Society. 



i'rVJj', '.'V 



WILD RICE 
BRINGS /le DUCKS 



PLANT WILD RICE NOW 
to bring swarms of wild ducks 
next Full Terrell's seeds 
grow. Write for prices and in- 
'ormati'in on planting. 

TERRELL, Naturalist, Dept.P-3 1 , Oshkosh.Wis. 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6t h Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE EOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRAN TON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks- 
geese, turkeys i including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 

BREEDERS* AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



27 



PHEASANT EGGS 

AND 

ONE DAY OLD PHEASANTS 

For Spring and Summer Delivery 

Pheasant Eggs $3.00 per dozen. [One Day Old Pheasants $8.00 per dozen. 

THE CEDARS 

A. BRADLEY OSSINIING (R. F. D.), IN- Y. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. "We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

1 am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only srrall parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 



J. B. WHITE 



WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



RAISE MALLARDS 

Eggs for Hatching — Manitoba Stock 

Setting $3 00 

Hundred ... 20.00 

Strong Flying Birds— Prompt Delivery 

HEMLOCKS GAME FARM 

P.O. Box No. 1011 Bridgeport, Conn. 



Yama Brook Trout 



9) 

ft 



Scientifically bred by the Darwinian 
theory for vigor, quick growing to large size 
and to produce a large number of eggs — 
absolutely free of disease, frequently thriv- 
ing where others die._ 

Information in reference to trout breed- 
ing and keeping cheerfully given by our 
trout culturist. 

Scientific examination made of your con- 
ditions for keeping trout at moderate charge. 

We have on hand for stocking 1,500,000 
Yama Trout from fry to 2 lbs. Eggs in 
seaaon. 

YAMA FARMS 

Napanoch, Ulster County, N. Y. 



WILD TURKEY EGGS 

$15.00 PER DOZEN UNTIL MAY 1st 
$12.00 PER DOZEN AFTER MAY 1st 

These eggs are from true Wild Turkeys. Orders filled in 
the order in which they are received. 

MARY C. WILKIE, Beaverdam, Virginia 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gtmc*' 



28 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
: and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



.'sassa 




.'■ ^sa w f - ' 



PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 






Pheasant Eggs 

FOR SALE 

LARGE OR SMALL QUANTITIES 

If you wish to be assured of secur- 
ing fresh eggs from vigorous stock 
send your order to 

American Game Breeders Society 

2271 WOOLWORTH BUILDING, 
NEW YORK CITY. 

Organized to protect the buying public 
from imposition. 



, - .• Ti. r.~- «-.«!«- or sien your letteri: "Your« for More Game." 

In wiiting to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign yuui 



THE GAME BREEDER 



29 




WE are now booking 
orders for eggs for 
Spring delivery from 
the following varieties of 
pheasants : Silver, Golden, 
Ringneck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, Mongo- 
lian, Reeves, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Impeyan, 
Soemmering, Manchurian 
Eared, Melanotus, Blackthroated Golden, 
Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

AlsoTWild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff 
Orpington and R. I. Red Fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan, and Fancy 
Ducks, and Doves of several varieties. 
Deer, Jack Rabbits. 



Send fifty cents in stamps for 
colortype catalogue. 



CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 




Established 1860 



Telephone 4569 Spring 



FRED SAUTER 



Leading Taxidermist of America 



42 Bleecker Street 



New York City 



Corner Lafayette Street. Subway Station at the Door. 



Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 



Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



This 

Practical] 
Bird House 
— postpaid 



15c 



Everyone knows how attractive it is 
to have birds nesting in the trees about 
his home, but only those who have tried 
to attract the birds know how difficult 
it is to induce them to nest in artificial 
houses. These feathered friends are as 
careful of their surroundings as their 
human neighbors. Their homes must 
be clean, inconspicuous, snug against 
the elements, and free from the odors 
to which birds object. 

The house shown here is made of 
durable Ru-ber-oid Roofing. It is water 
tight,. odorless and of a color that makes 
it all but invisible against the gray tree 
trunk that holds it. Light and strongly 
built, it will last for years. Water will 
not rot it nor the hot sun warp it out of 
shape; in fact, it is a model of simple, 
practical, construction. 

Ru-ber-oid houses seem particularly attract- 
ive to the small, insectiverous birds that are 
such untiring' aids to the householder in his 
battle with the grubs and beetles that do so 
much damage to his gardens and fruit-trees. 

You cannot make a more acceptable present 
to your bird neighbors than this attractive house. 
15c in stamps or coins, with your name and 
address, will bring one to you, postage free. 

THE STANDARD PAINT CO. 

233 Broadway New York 



Ih writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



30 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

Sew York City 



LIVE GAME 



WILD TURKEYS- 
in this issue. W. 
County, Pa. 



•For prices see display advertisement 
J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 



FOR SALE-GOLDEN PHEASANTS. TWO YEAR 
old stock. Eggs in season. A. M. SHERMAN, Marsh- 
field, Mass. it 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3.25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wn g Teal, 
$3-75 P er pair. Also reJheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices. lor propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANT RY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT. Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 

Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



PHEASANTS -GOLDEN, SILVER, LADY AM- 
herst, Ringneck. Bantams, Japanese Silkies, Buff 
Cochin. "Ringlet" Barred Rocks. All full blood splen- 
did stock. Egg orders booked now. MRS. IVER 
CHR1STENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 

PHEASANTS- BREEDING STOCK AND EGGS FOR 

sale. Ringnecks, Mongolians, Silvers, Goldens, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Prince of Wales. ROBINSON BROS., 
Alder^hot, Ontario, Canada. 3t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT HENS, 1917 HATCH, $5.00 
each. Matured Silvers and Crosses. $12.00 per pair. 
Crosses are Golden and Lady Amherst. 1917 hatched 
rro-ses. $4.00 each. F. A. W. SHAW, 565 West 192nJ St., 
N. Y. C. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL,' PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to stari 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and While 
Swans.WUd Duoks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

BELGIAN HARES AND FLEMISH GIANTS FOR 

sale Al stock. C. W. DIXON, 8612 Moigan Street, 

Chicago, 111. It 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS—WILD MALLARDS. 

WILD GEFSE AND GAME. FOURTEEN VARO- 

TIES OF STANDARD POULTRY, INCLUDING 

TURKEYS. ALSO ELK. LIsT FREE. G. H HARRIS. 



TAYLORVILLE ILL. 



LIVE GAME WANTED 



PHEASANTS WANTED. 
Between two and three hundred field grown young 
ringnecks for breeding purposes. In application 
particulars olease quote prices for pairs, trios, and 
cocks and hens separately in such quantity for Fall 
or Winter delivery. Address A. M., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes ; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling. Ky. 



GAME EGGS 



40,000 EGGS FOR SALE. 

40,000 Pure Bred Chinese, Ringneck and Mongolian 
Pheasant Eggs, for this season; will book your order now 
for April, May, June and July delivery; place your orders 
early and get the best eggs. We also have Silver, Golden. 
Reeves, Lady Amherst, Swinhoe, Elliott and Soemmerring 
Et?gs, but no birds for sale now. Some Quail and Ducks, 
Mallards and Teal. WESTERN WASHINi i\ ON 
PHEASANT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, A. I.Park, 
Sec'y, 111 Columbia St., Seattle, Wash. 

I WILL SELL A FEW DOZEN WILD MALLARD 

duck eggs at $3 50 per dozen. Eggs from same tlock 
were very fertile last year. J. B. FOOTE, Frederick, 
town, Ohio. 2t 

MALLARDS S3.50 PAIR. EGGS 10c. RINGNECK 

eggs, 20c each. Silvers, Goldens and 30 varieties poultry 
eggs. English Setter Dog. HARRY SWiNHURNE, 
Dehli, Iowa. it 

FOR SALE- PURE BRED CHINESE PHEASANT 
eggs, $3.50 per dozen. E. J. SHUMAKER. Jefferson, 



Oregon. 



2t 



PHEASANT EGGS, TWO-FIFTY PER THIRTEEN. 
ELLERMAN, Yankton, S. D. 4t 

PHEASANTS EGGS— CHINESE, $3.50; RINGNECK, 

S3.00 ; Mongolion, $5.00 dozen. LINN RINGNECK 

RANCH, State-licensed and reliable, AJbany, Oregon. 2t 

ENGLISH RINGNECK, PURE CHINESE AND 

Golden Pheasant eggs, $3.00 per dozen. Silver, Reeves, 
Amherst and Mongolian, $5.00 per dozen. SIMPSON'S 
PHEASANT FARM, Corvaliis, Oregon. ■ At 

FOR SALE— EGGS FROM ELEVEN VARIETIES OF 

pheasants and some birds. MAPLE GkOVE PH EAS- 

ANTRV AND PET STOCK, 43 Iden Ave., Pelham 

Manor. New York. 3t 




FOR SALE— GOI.DF.N. SILVER AND RINGNECK 

pheasant eggs. Dr JOHN M SATTLEK, Beardeek, 

Wisconsin. 2t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game B-eeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



31 



EGGS-WILD MALLARD, FROM OPEN STREAM 
and Lake range. Flock headed by drakes direct from 
wild stock Also Mammoth rimnze Turkey eges, @ $3.00 
per dozen. Book orders now. Five times oversold last 
season. T. W. INUERSOLL. Wah-Wah-Taysee Lodge, 
Buffalo. Minn. it 

WILD TURKEY'S EGGS. $6.00 PER 12 UP. t ER- 

tility Guaranteed. LEWIS COMPTON, Dias Creek, 

New Jersey. it 

GLbNWuuD PHEASAN I R1KS, HADLYME, CONN 
Ringnt-ck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 
R. K. McPHAIL 4t 

CHINESE. GOLDEN, MONGOLIAN, REEVES, AM- 
herst, Silver Pheaaant eggs from healthy, unrelated 
stock. Shipped che same day they are gathered. New 
Zealand Rabbits, Ringneck Doves, Pigeons, Japanese 
Silky and Buff Cochin Bantam eggs in any quantity. 
Three thousand full wing Chinese for fa I d--liveiy 
MARMuT PHEAS »NTRY, Marmoi. Oregon ^ 



FOODS 



State Game F/rm, June 21, 1917. 
Mr. C. B. Kern, 10 East Main St., Mount Joy, Pa. 

Dear Sir: — Please book our order for 100,000 Meal 
Worms, to be shipped in lots of 10,000 every 3 days, start- 
ing at once. Trusting that we may rely on outctual ship- 
ments, we are, Very truly, STATE GAME FARM, 
Per 

Their first order was 5000 on May 19, next 10,000 on 
June 7, and then the above. Every shipment lett t romptly 
on time, and many others, also, possibly yours. My price 
for 1918 is 500 at $100 ; 1000 at $1 50 ; 5000 or more, in one 
shipment at Si. 00 per 1000. All express prepaid. 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed Wild Celery. Sago 
Pond Weed, Wi.geon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other k nds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes-where these, the best of duck fcods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Watetlily, N. C. 
Cut muck Sound. 



ACORNS 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lo's. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges W. R. 
McLEAM, K. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



TJ/^\/^X^"0 Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

DvWJ\u Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St . N. Y. 

"OUR FEATHERED GAME," BY D W. HUNT- 

ington, contains porttaits of all American game birds and 

shooting scenes in color. Postpaid $2.00. THE GAME 

BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPERS 

WANTED — POSITION AS GAMEKEEPER OR 
caretaker of Shooting Lodge, by married man. Life 
experienced in game breeding, cause of leaving present 
situation Lieutenant going to Europe and closing his 
shooting lodge and deer park Age 36 years. Can fur- 
nish first-class references. Seve<. years present place. 
G. SIMPSON, care of Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
N. V. City. 

GAMEKEEPER — POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 
gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionport, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
larm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dugs, and trapping vermin. A S R., care of Game 
B eeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPER-SITUATION WANTED 

American game breeder with a 15 year experience wishes 
to raise 5000 ringnecks for a private party or State ; and 
havng an incubator and brooder plant. Apply lu THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Si , New York, N. Y. 

HEAD KEEPER SCOTCH, WISHES A POSITION 
Small family, four years' good reference from | resent 
employer, good reason for leaving. Experienced on 
pheasants, quail, wild turkey and mallards. Ten years' 
references in this country. Apply J. C. E„ care of The 
Game Bieeaer, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6 t 

POSITION WANTED OV A SHOO I ING PRESERVE 

by a practical and reliable Manager, wide ly experienced 
here and abroad. Expert on rearing Pheasant, Quail, 
cartridge, Wild Turkeys and Wild Ducks, etc., the man- 
agement of Incubators, also a handler and trainer of 
tirld and high-class shooting dogs. A capable man to 
sl.ow sport, excellent trapper of vermin, a reliable and 
trustworthy all around manager. J. H. W., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, POSITION ON GAME PRESERVE. OR 
poultry farm, to finish my experiment < in electrifying 
day old game and poultry, which stimulates their growth 
100 per cent : also to finish my apparatus, that will sex day- 
old birds and will tell whether an egg is fertile or not ; if 
fertile, the sex of the bird when hatched out. I am a 
lecturer, demonstrator, and writer on poultry and 
game. 20 years' experience in America and Europe. 
S. HERBERT, care of Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can' plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER.— SITUATION, WANTED. — I can 

furnish good English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper ; can rear thousands of birds, and train 
dogs, &c. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to get a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address J. H., care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 

TR AVERS D CARMAN, c/o THE OUTLOOK, 3814th 
Ave., New York City, wishes'to recommend his head 
gamekeeper, who has had life experience on large and 
small estates in raising of pheasants, partridges, wild duck 
and quail. Understands handling and training of dogs for 
hunting and field trials, also care of fish, trapping and 
killing of vermin. Married, age 26, English. For full 
particulars, apply to W. BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, 
Danielson, Conn. it 



MISCELLANEOUS 



200 PHEASANTS WANTED WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age or birds. 
R. A. MAXWELL, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, S5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pinic of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 22Dg Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. u 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED. EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH, ONAW A 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postpaid. THE BLACK F(>X 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., Ne«- Y< rk 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



32 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from tho se who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



BREEDERS' CARDS 




LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 
BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

Member of the Game Guild. 



FANCY PHEASANTS 
Cochin Bantams, Silkies 

Booklet Free 
Stock and Eggs Reasonable 
E. M. MENGEL 
S_ Box8-P, Auburn, Penna. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $6.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 
Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 






America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 



BOOK ON 

DOG DISEASES 
And How to Feed 

Mailed free te any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 





BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 
Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
G if ford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER 
Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



DOGS 

HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
102. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky 



THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2200 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 




In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



S PRATT'S 
GAME- REARING ADJUNCTS 

Are Indispensable Yet Inexpensive 



SPRATT'S CARDIAC 
"GAME SPICE" 

Contains valuable, stimulating 
and appetizing properties and 
should be added to staple 
food during raw and inclement 
weather, as it frequently wards 
off attacks of Gapes, Diarrhoea 
and Cramps. 



SPRATTS BONE MEAL 
FOR GAME 

Is an invaluable adjunct to the 
soft food diet. It contains valu- 
able lime - phosphates and is 
much cheaper than fresh bone, 
which contains at least 50% 
moisture and which of necessity 
has to be given quite fresh. 



Beware of Gapes. Prevention is better than cure. 

SPRATTS BLACKERITE 

Is the most effective yet agreeable method of completely 
eradicating the disease. 



FIXE FEATHERS MAKE FIXE BIRDS 

SPRATTS PARTRIDGE MEAL 

MAKES BOTH. 



Success in raising semi-wild birds can only be attained by care and 
experience. Correct feeding is half the battle. "We supply the right 
kind of ammunition and you will get results if you follow directions. 



Send for Pheasant Culture," price 25c. "Poultry Culture " price 10c. 
"Dog Culture " sent on receipt of 2c. stamp. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

ST. LOUIS CLEVELAND MONTREAL 

FACTORY ALSO IN LONDON, ENGLAND 



Game Breeders! 



tti tfrnrrai siran rarawiK 1 



Use the Remington UMC Model 12 

.22 Caliber Repeating Rifle for 

Exterminating Vermin 




Model No. 12 A 
Standard" Grade 

NO one knows better than the breeder of game the losses 
incurred through predatory animals. Vermin are a 
menace to wild life. 

The .22 caliber rifle is really a necessity on a game farm. 
A good small bore arm with its comparatively inexpensive 
ammunition meets every requirement. 

The Remington UMC .22 Caliber Model 12 Repeating 
Rifle is adopted probably by more sportsmen than any other 
small bore arm. Specifications: Chambered to take without 
adjustment .22 Short, .22 Long and .22 Long Rifle Cartridges; 
magazine holds 15, 12 and 11 cartridges respectively. .22-inch 
Remington steel, round barrel with 16-inch twist. Straight 
grip, walnut stock fitted with rubber butt plate. Weight A l / 2 
pounds. Also furnished chambered for .22 short onh- without 
extra charge. Special step rear sight with finger piece, white 
metal bead sporting front sight. 

Ask Your Nearest Remington UMC Dealer 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC 
CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING NEW YORK CITY 



Fty.Uq 



&*± I3£U 



&1°° PerYear 



filllMilJlillllJIHJllMIIIHIMIIIIIIIIIllHlllHHillMII 



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Single CoDieslO 1 



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IS5C- 



THE- 



G AH E BREEDER 



VOL. XIII. 



MAY, 1918 



No. 2 



The Object of this magazine is 

'toMake North Ameeicathe 5iggest 

[Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 







Survey of the Field — A. Bad Season? — A Wrong Idea — Abundant 
Game — Practical Experiments — More Game and Fewer Game 
Laws — Wild Duck Abundance— The Migratory Bill — Statesmen 
and Politicians— Du Pont Photograph Contest— Regulation for the 
Protection of Deer — America Now the Biggest Pheasant Producing 
Country in the World. 

A New Long Island Game Breeders Association 
My Experience in Game Breeding - - J. B. Foote 

Present Status of the Heath Hen - Hon. Wm. C. Adams 

Music and Food - - By the Editor 

Notes from The Game Farms and Preserves By Our Readers 

Rearing Ringnecked and Golden Pheasants, Mrs. Edgar 
Tilton— Texas Game — Owls Devour Pigs— Prize Quails — 
The Innocent Cat— Dogs and Cats — An Oregon Deer Farm, 
ByG.D.Gorm— More Dog — Pheasants and Blackbirds— In- 
breeding — The Game and The Farmer — New Outdoor 
Life Club — Miroc Lodge — Quails Plentiful— May Be War 
Birds— Dogs in School — Grabbed By Germans— Partial 
Report of Minnesota State Game Farm — A Late Season — 
One Day Old Pheasants. 

Editorials — Imagination — Where are the Buffaloes? 
Correspondence — Outings and Innings— Trade Notes, Etc. 




T^& 



SUBLISNED BY 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

MEW YOOK CITY U.VA S.J >w> ./J 



' : i: - :i'' : i!!l'i:MiMl'iiiii:ii!i!iiii:ii!iiii!llllillllllll|/!illilllllllil!ll[lllllllll!lllilli|rilHi:[.v 




HMMD 



- 



: 



8 
5 

i 

■- 



r 



: 







ATT'S 

Foods for Dogs, Poultry and Pet Stock 

We continue to manufacture our foods, but the 
restrictions of the Food Administrator and our 
resolve to conform to the spirit as well as the 
letter of the law makes it increasingly difficult to 
supply the enormous demand. 

We also foresee " a period during which most of 
our Dog Foods will have to be sold in a granular 
form. We urge our customers to begin at once 
to make at least a part of their order for 

SPRATT'S 

War Rodnim No. 1 

This has always been a favorite food of 
the expert kennel owners and trainers. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, N. J. 

San Francisco, Caf. St. Louis, Mo. Cleveland, Ohio Montreal, Canada 

Factory also in London, England 






12 



Write for sample and send 

2c. stamp for "Dog Culture. " t 



i 




THE GAME BREEDER 



33 




SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



(g) \BLACK SHELLS 



REPEATER 
LEADER 



Which is Your Favorite? 

It is certainly one of the 14 shells named in the column to the left. 
These are ^he standard makes of loaded shotgun shells. You can obtain 
your favorite, loaded with a Hercules Smokeless Shotgun Powder, by 
specifying the powder when you buy the shell. 

Many experienced sportsmen ask that their shells be loaded with either 
Infallible or "E.C.". They know by experience that 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 



INFALLIBLE 

can be depended upon underall con- 
ditions, at the traps or in the field. 
These powders are absolutely uni- 
form in quality, give high velocity, 
even patterns and light recoil. 

Look for the name Infallible or 



E.C" 

"E. C."on the outside of the box in 
which you buy your shells, or on 
the top wad of the shell itself . Tell 
your dealer that you want your 
favorite shells loaded with a Her- 
cules Powder. 



JfEJ^CULES POWDER CO. 

77 W. 11th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 







34 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

"'Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly -and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



35 



— y* 




Mr. John B. Burnham, President ot the American Game Asso- 
ciation, says: " Trapshooting is great practice for both experts 
and beginners and develops crack field shots." 

The Clay Pigeon Knows No Game Laws 

There is no limit of season, law or 
time. There is no long distance jour- 
ney to the shooting grounds. There is 
never the disappointment of not find- 
ing game. 

Trapshooting 

is always ready at every shooting club. Clay 
birds are plentiful — ready with their speedy 
flight and vexing turns to give you more gun 
thrills to the minute than any "feathered 
game" can give. 

Every man— every woman should know 
how to shoot and "hit" what they shoot at. 
The gun club is the place to learn this demo- 
cratic, patriotic sport. Find out how— now. 

Check trapshooting in the coupon — mail it 
to us and get all the facts. 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 



Mark X before subject that interests you 
and Mail This Coupon to 

E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

ADVERTISING DIVISION 
Wilmington G. B. Delaware 




Trapshooting 


Hunting 


Sporting Powders 




Industrial Explosives 


Farm Explosives 


Py-ra-lin Toilet Goods 




Town & Country Paint 


Fabrikoid Upholstery 


Fairfield Rubber Cloth 




Commercial Acids 




Bronze Powder 






Add 




City 




State 









Established 1802 



WILMINGTON 



DELAWARE 



anus 



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ri 



if= 






n 



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36 



THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR BUSINESS IS 

MAKING GUNS 




For over 50 years we have made big 
guns, little guns, good guns— The "OLD 
RELIABLE" Parker Guns. 

Send for Catalogue and 20 Bore Booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROTHERS meriden, conn., u. s. a. 

NEW YORK SALESROOMS, 32 WARREN STREET 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



One Day Old Pheasants 



The Levana Game Farm offers for sale 
one day old Pheasants* Broods will be 
shipped with the hen which hatched 
them* Write for prices, *^ & £• <£> 

GEORGE, BEAL, Head Gamekeeper 

LEVANA GAME FARM 

R. F. D. 1, Englishtown, New Jersey 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July g. 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME XIII 



MAY, 1918 
Co} 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 2 



A Bad Session? 

Under the heading, "A Bad Session at 
Albany for Game Conservation," The 
New York Sun says, "Certainly the Leg- 
islature which adjourned last week will 
not receive the thanks of the sportsmen 
of the Empire State." 

The Sun is right in its criticism of the 
abolishment of the office of State Fish 
Culturist, but The Sun should remem- 
ber that an election approaches and the 
fact that the fish culturist is capable may 
be more than offset by the fact, stated 
by The Sun, that he was not a resident 
of this State when employed. 

A Wrong Idea. 

Whoever suggested to The Sun the 
idea that the ruffed grouse season should 
be closed for two years has evidently no 
knowledge of natural history and little, 
if any, knowledge of the effect of such 
legislation. The heath hen became ex- 
tinct in New York while a closed season 
was in force. Real conservationists 
know that laws preventing anyone from 
having ruffed grouse to shoot, to eat or 
to sell are very likely to result in the 
extermination of the grouse in settled 
regions, at least, and it is in such re- 
gions the birds should be kept plentiful, 
as they easily can be, for food. 

The late Mr. Whitehead well said, 
"It requires the extinction of a valuable 
game bird to teach the average Ameri- 
can the importance of its preservation." 

Abundant Game. 

It has been shown beyond a reason- 
able doubt that it is a very easy matter 
to make game birds abundant. Only a 



few years ago we secured a law making 
it legal to produce certain species of 
birds for food. As a result the pheas- 
ants and mallards rapidly have become 
abundant in many places. Had the law 
closed the season there would have been 
no production. 

Two thousand birds have been shot 
near an artificial pond where they were 
bred and where, of course, no ducks 
bred when there was no pond. An ad- 
vertisement in The Game Breeder of 
40,000 pheasant eggs for sale does not 
indicate that the Legislature should pro- 
hibit the production of pheasants or the 
shooting and sale of the birds, for two 
years or for any other period. 

Practical Experiments. 

The Game Conservation Society con- 
templates making some practical experi- 
ments with ruffed grouse. To do this 
it is necessary to have funds, which in- 
telligent sportsmen are willing to fur- 
nish. Those who collect vast funds in 
order to secure foolish legislation never 
have any money to expend on game and 
like the dog in the manger they do not 
want anyone else to produce or eat 
game, possibly because such conduct 
might interfere with their game-saving 
activities. Millions surely, and possibly 
billions of dollars, have been expended 
in the effort to save the game by law. 

The criterion of abundance is found 
in the markets. Judged by this standard 
America appears to have become game- 
less. 

The Sun is right in saying the Legis- 
lature had a chance to strike from the 
Penal Law the section relating to Sun- 



38 



THE GAME BREEDER 



day fishing. It is wrong in our opinion, 
decidedly wrong, in complaining that the 
Legislature missed the chance of "doing 
a half-dozen constructive things" ; mak- 
ing about a half-dozen more restrictive 
laws. 

More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 

The real constructive methods con- 
templated by those who favor the more 
game and fewer game laws idea include 
amendments to existing laws so that it 
will be no longer criminal to profitably 
produce any species of food on a farm. 
The fact that not only half a dozen old 
style constructive things were over- 
looked in New York is fully offset by 
the fact that as many as ninety of the old 
style "game protection" laws have been 
enacted in a single season and profes- 
sional wild lifers and protectionists have 
been at this game of getting more game 
laws for over 50 years with the result 
that the enactments are so numerous that 
no lawyer knows what all the laws are 
about. The people, however, are pre- 
sumed to know the law and The Sun as 
well as other papers has denounced fool 
arrests which, in our opinion, are espe- 
cially objectionable, oftentimes, because 
nothing like moral turpitude appears in 
the offences and, in fact, the things done 
are considered right and laudable often 
in the older countries — the taking of 
wild birds and eggs for breeding pur- 
poses for example. 

Certain it is that after 50 years' trial, 
the game laws have not made the grouse 
and the quail plentiful in the markets. 
Certain it is that thousands of birds 
freed from the game law restrictions 
are shot every season and many are 
sold as food in places where the laws 
permit the necessary industry required 
to produce the food. 

Wild Duck Abundance. 

It is said there will be a shortage in 
the sales of straw hats this year of over 
a million hats because Uncle Sam will 
supply that number of hats to men who 
will not buy "straws." 

The fact that a great number of the 
Canadian sportsmen are not shooting 



wild ducks and have not been for some 
years furnishes a sufficient reason for 
the increase in the number of wild ducks 
which has been noted. A million gun- 
ners in Canada and the United States 
not shooting 30 or even 10 ducks each in 
a day during a long open season or dur- 
ing the days given to sport resulted, no 
doubt, in many ducks, possibly many mil- 
lions being spared, and, of course, that 
many ducks should produce many more 
ducks in the Northern States, wnere 
State laws for years have prohibited 
shooting in the nesting season. 

The Migratory Bird Bill. 

Those who are endeavoring to put 
over on the Congress the legal absurd- 
ity, known as the migratory bird bill, 
urge as a reason for its passage the fact 
that since it has passed the Senate it has 
resulted in all the ducks becoming nu- 
merous as reported. These people may 
possibly believe that one more game law 
half made has produced a big lot of 
ducks, but real naturalists know that 
ducks are not made that way. 

The law evidently was suggested by 
someone entirely ignorant of natural 
history and we have charged repeatedly 
that it was not written by a lawyer or 
by anyone having an elementary knowl- 
edge of what a criminal law should be 
and no one has challenged our asser- 
tions. The idea always seems to be 
when such legislation is afoot to keep 
as still as possible about its demerits and 
to sneak it through quietly at the end of 
a session. 

Statesmen and Careless Politicians. 

The statesman who carefully reads a 
bill and who' considers it carefully is apt 
to vote right, but too often the careless 
politician who listens to those whose liv- 
ing may depend upon their getting more 
laws and who are always running to the 
people for more "stuff" to get more laws 
appears to be in the majority and the 
result is a mass of absurd legislation 
which is worse than absurd when it cre- 
ates a lot of fanciful crimes, especially 
crimes which often we have properly 
designated as "food production crimes" 



THE GAME BREEDER 



39 



or crimes preventing the production of 
food. 

Why on earth it should be legal to 
have and to eat oysters and fish but not 
game in America no one seems able to 
explain excepting on the theory that 
those who are in the game law industry 
seem to be able to scare legislators or 
possibly to hoodwink them. 

When the oyster was not properly 
looked after there was danger of its ex- 
tinction. Had laws been enacted pre- 
venting anyone from looking after the 
oyster industry we would have no oysters 
to eat. 

A law providing practically that no 
one can transport or sell a wild duck 
may kill an infant wild duck producing 
industry in America, but we would like 
to see the bill amended before it is enact- 
ed so as to provide that the oysters shall 
be regulated in the same manner as it is 
proposed to regulate the wild duck indus- 
try. 

Read the bill, Members of Congress, 
and decide if you must to put an end to 
the production, transportation and sale 
of desirable foods. 

If the proposed law can be amended 
so as to read, "nothing in this act shall 
apply to wild fowl produced by industry 
and those charged with making, the crim- 
inal regulations shall issue permits to 
breeders to take wild fowl for breeding 
purposes," we will not object to the pas- 
sage of the bill. If, however, there is an 
objection such an amendment (we are 
told there is) it would seem to be evi- 
dent that the intention is to prohibit a 
food producing industry which is making 
rapid strides in the States where it no 
longer is criminal to produce any kind 
of food on a farm. 

If those who ask the Congress to make 
the most remarkable grant of power to 
make and also execute criminal regula- 
tions are unwilling to except food pro- 
ducers, it would seem that they must 
look forward to arresting people for 
having food birds or eggs in possession 
for breeding purposes. Such arrests 
have been made by State wardens and 
such arrests were becoming common 
when we called for a halt. 



DU PONT PHOTOGRAPH 
CONTEST. 

The Du Pont American Industries Of- 
fer Fifty Prizes for the Best. 
Photographs. 

To increase the interest in Du Pont 
products and to secure suitable photo- 
graphs to illustrate the advertising and 
publicity of their various companies the 
Du Pont American Industries offer $500 
in prizes for the fifty best photographs. 

The prizes are as follows : First 
prize, $100; second prize, $50;' two third 
prizes, $25 each ; fourteen fourth prizes, 
$10 each ; thirty-two fifth prizes, $5 
each. 

The photographs have to illustrate the 
following subjects, and be submitted be- 
fore September 1, 1918. 

Agricultural Uses of Explosives, Fa- 
brikoid (Artificial Leather), Industrial 
Uses of Explosives, Painting, Trap- 
shooting and Hunting, Miscellaneous. 

Any subjects illustrating the use of 
any Du Pont products, will be given 
equal consideration. 

Some of the conditions of the contest 
are: 

No employes of the Du Pont Ameri- 
can Industries are eligible in this con- 
test. 

Each photograph to be eligible for a 
prize, must be accompanied by the nega- 
tive (film or plate). 

On the back of each photograph sub- 
mitted must be plainly written the name 
and address of the contestant, the sub- 
ject illustrated, the place where the 
photograph was taken and any other 
helpful data. 

The number of photographs that can 
be submitted by any one contestant is 
unlimited nor is there any limit upon the 
number of prizes that can be won by any 
contestant. 

All photographs submitted, whether or 
not awarded prizes, are to become the 
property of the Du Pont American In- 
dustries. 

All photographs submitted will be 
judged by a committee to be appointed 
by the Director of Advertising of the 
Du Pont American Industries. Prizes 



40 



THE GAME BREEDER 



will be awarded not later than Septem- 
ber 15, 1918. 

The Du Pont Photograph Contest will 
close on September 1, 1918. No photo- 
graphs postmarked at Wilmington, Del., 
later than September 1, 1918, will be ac- 
cepted in this contest. 

Each contestant must fill out and mail 
an entry blank to the Advertising Divi- 
sion, Du Pont Company, Wilmington, 
Delaware, with the first photographs 
submitted or the photographs will not be 
accepted in the contest. 

All photographs entered in this con- 
test must be plainly marked "Photograph 
Contest" and mailed to the Advertising 
Division, Du Pont Company, Wilming- 
ton, Delaware, full postage prepaid. 

Regulation for the Protection of Deer 
on Certain Islands in Alaska. 

(Effective April 1, 1918.) 
By virtue of the authority conferred 
upon the Secretary of Agriculture by 
section 2 of the act of May 11, 1908 (35 
Stat, 102), entitled 'An act to amend 
an act entitled 'An act for the protec- 
tion of game in Alaska, and for other 
purposes,' approved June 7, 1902," 
regulation 5 of the Regulations for the 
Protection of Deer, Moose, Caribou, 
Sheep, and Mountain Goats in Alaska, 
approved July 24, 1916, and amended 
July 23, 1917, is hereby further amend- 
ed, effective April 1, 1918, so as to read 
as follows : 

REGULATION 5.— DEER ON CER- 
TAIN ISLANDS. 

The killing of deer on Kodiak Island 
and Long Island ; on the following 
islands in southeastern Alaska : Duke 
Island, near Dixon Inlet, Gravina Island, 
near Ketchikan, Kruzof Island, west of 
Sitka, San Juan Island and Suemez 
Island, near Klawak, and Zerembo 
Island, near Wrangell ; and on the islands 
of Hawkins, Hinchinbrook, and Monta- 
gue, in Prince William Sound, is hereby 
prohibited until August 1, 1919. 

In testimony whereof I have here- 
unto set my hand and caused the seal 
of the Department of Agriculture to be 
affixed this 13th day of March, 1918. 
(seal) Clarence Otjsley, 

Acting Secretary of Agriculture. 



[This law like all other prohibitive laws 
should contain a section providing that nothing 
in the act shall be held to apply to game 
breeders. Otherwise a food-producing indus- 
try may be prevented. — Editor.] 



America Is Now the Biggest Pheasant 
Producing Country in the World! 

Mr. Rabb, one of our Oregon mem- 
bers, well said, in our November issue, 
"This country will never again be com- 
pelled to import her game birds." 

Our readers will remember that at 
the outset of the more game movement 
we pointed out that hundreds of thous- 
ands of dollars were sent abroad annu- 
ally to purchase wild food birds ; that we 
insisted that this money should go to 
American farmers. It is gratifying to 
announce that they are now getting the 
money and that they are making good 
use of it. 

It may be said that this is a benefit 
which the war has brought to America. 
We believe the result would have been 
the same and that it would have come 
even faster than it has if there had been 
no war. 

Had the importation of pheasants re- 
mained possible American breeders would 
have been able to procure many more 
thousands of pheasants than they have 
been able to procure for breeding pur- 
poses and we believe we could have made 
the announcement that America is now 
the biggest pheasant producing country 
in the world a year earlier. 



There will be another legislature in 
Ohio before long and we then expect 
to restore the quail to the food bird list 
where Audubon placed it and where all 
real naturalists say it should be placed. 

The way to save the grouse is to make 
them tremendously abundant and cheap 
in the markets. The sale of some of the 
birds will furnish the money to enable 
any protective association to provide ex- 
cellent shooting for all of its members 
during a long open season. Plans and 
specifications furnished by The Game 
Breeder on request. State game depart- 
ments, inclined to food production, easily 
can point out the way, as they do in 
Massachusetts. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



41 




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The Club House 



NEW LONG ISLAND GAME BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION. 



A new Game Breeders' Association, or 
shooting syndicate, has been formed to 
breed game of the species which legally 
can be produced for shooting under the 
New York Game Breeders' law. Ex- 
periments also will be made in breeding 
quail and other American game birds 
which can only be shot in limited num- 
bers or not at all. 

Many members of the old Game 
Breeders' Association at Wading River, 
who dropped out when the club was 
moved to Orange County, often have 
talked about starting a new association 
on Long Island, which is more access- 
able to New York and Brooklyn sports- 
men than the preserve near Port Jervis 
was. 

The new grounds are not quite as far 
out on the island as the old grounds were 
and in some ways they appear to be more 
suitable for game. The soil is better and 
foods for the game can be more easily 
produced. The house is perhaps not 
quite so good as the old house was but 
it is steamheated and those who go down 
to shoot can be made comfortable. From 
some of the fields views of the sound are 
obtained and the woodlands are pictur- 



esque and very suitable for ruffed 
grouse. The association hopes to be 
able to procure some grouse and grouse 
eggs for experimental work in order to 
improve the grouse shooting. It is most 
fortunate that the bill to put the ruffed 
grouse on the song bird list for a period 
of years failed in the Assembly. Since, 
of course, no one could be expected to 
give the grouse any of the much needed 
care and attention if the laws prohibited 
the shooting and eating of grouse. 

The dues in the new club are fifty-two 
dollars a year and the reason for fixing 
this amount was to be able to demon- 
strate that good shooting can be had for 
a dollar a week provided the game be 
properly looked after. Many members 
who shoot well can, if the place is as suc- 
cessful as it promises to be, take home 
enough meat to largely offset the amount 
of the club dues and the members will 
donate a lot of game to hospitals enter- 
taining soldiers and sailors returning 
from abroad. The new club is com- 
posed largely of residents of New York 
and Brooklyn ; others residing at Great 
Neck, St. James, Northport and other 
Long Island villages. It seems likely the 



42 



THE GAME BREEDER 



club soon will have a waiting list since 
the opportunity for excellent sport and 
the chance to produce a good lot of game 
are inviting. Although members of the 
old club may not think the quarters quite 
as attractive as the old house was, the 
opportunities for breeding upland game 
certainly are far better than they were 
on the sandy fields and scrub oak bar- 
rens at Wading River. Those who' have 
organized the club have proceeded on 
the theory that it is more important to 
have good shooting than it is to have 
elaborate quarters and it is evident that 
there is a limit to what can be done with 
small annual dues. 

Although the club has made a late 
start it seems likely the shooting will be 
very good next fall. The rules of the 
club will probably be made similar to 
the club rules of the older association. 
Small shooting parties were permitted 
to take the place two days at a time and 
to visit it often during the season; those 
who had shot one or more times giv- 
ing way to those who had had no shoot- 
ing where two applications were made 



for the same date. The bag limits will 
be fixed as soon as the amount of game 
produced is ascertained and the man- 
agers hope to be able to make them large. 
Members can visit the club and see the 
breeding operations at any time during 
the summer and they can remain over- 
night if they wish to do so. As soon as 
the rooms are ready for occupants cards 
for visitors who may wish to visit the 
preserve during the breeding season 
probably will be issued as they were by 
the Game Breeders' Association. These 
resulted in many people becoming inter- 
ested in the production of game, some of 
whom started places of their own or in- 
troduced game breeding at other clubs in 
which they were interested. Some visit- 
ors came from a distance and it is to be 
hoped this educational feature may be 
preserved. Visitors, of course, could 
only visit the club before the shooting 
season opened. A club with a large 
membership should not be expected to 
provide shooting for many guests. The 
rules will be made simple and as liberal 
as the older rules were, no doubt. 



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Barn, Kennel and Hatching Houses. 



MY EXPERIENCE IN GAME BREEDING. 

By J. B. Foote. 



All I have ever done so far has been 
for our own home amusement. We 
raised several hundred ducks last year 
without much effort, and I thought if we 
could sell the surplus it would be better 
than letting them go and at the same 
time give employment to the children on 
the farm. 

In regard to my experience in raising 



geese and other birds, will say I have 
had more experience than profit. This 
is not because there is no money in the 
proposition nor because of inexperience 
on my part. It is because I have not 
done as well as I knew how. 

If I were twenty-five years younger 
and interested in things as I was then 
or if twenty-five years ago I had had the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



43 



opportunity I am certain my profit in 
this interesting occupation would have 
been quite large. 

The individual like myself who raises 
game, wild birds and animals to study 
and play with, will make a failure as far 
as profit is concerned. 

Geese, turkeys, ducks, pheasants and 
even quail can be raised profitably, but 
to say that the average person can do it 
as easily as raising so many broods of 
chickens, is going far beyond the truth. 
Of all the wild game I have tried to 
raise I have had by far the best experi- 
ence with ducks. 

One of the drawbacks in getting peo- 
ple interested in raising game is that the 
propagators live too far apart. There 
are only about so many people that be- 
come interested and they are so well 
distributed over the country that they 
do not get to see one another often 
enough to keep up interest. In regard 
to wild geese, a number of years ago I 
ordered a trio of wild geese from one of 
the leading game breeders who wrote me 
in reply that it would be of no use to 
order the third one as he had never 
known o£ a polygamist in the wild goose 
family. I have also been told this a 
great many other times by men of wide 
experience. I bought two, a male and a 
female. The party from whom I pur- 
chased them sent me an extra goose 
which he said he had had about twenty 
years and had never mated. 

Last year each of the females hatched 



six young goslings. This year about 
the middle of February the old gander 
commensed manifesting his imperial au- 
thority choosing one of the females for 
his consort. After he got her comfort- 
ably settled in a feather lined nest with 
her seven eggs what did the old rascal 
do but desert her entirely and he is now 
bestowing his affection and attentiveness 
on the other goose which at this writing 
has four eggs to her credit. 

Last year about the same program was 
followed. About two or three days be- 
fore the first eggs were to hatch the 
gander came back to his first mate, chas- 
ing everyone and everything else off the 
premises. When the second brood be- 
gan to hatch he again turned traitor and I 
gave his attention to his second mate. 

After both broods were running about 
the gander was shown up properly as 
neither of the females would tolerate 
his presence. Instead of him strutting 
around them then he followed an old 
plymouth rock hen, trying his best to 
persuade her to be his mate. I believe 
he thought himself to be quite guilty in 
his Brigham Young tactics. 

I know a good many, and perhaps all 
game breeders will say they do not be- 
lieve this story, but nevertheless I have 
two nests of fertile eggs and in about 
two weeks will show you some fine gos- 
lings. 

[We shall be glad to have you send us photo- 
graphs of the goslings. Let a professional 
photographer make their portraits and send us 
the bill.— Editor.] 



PRESENT STATUS OF THE HEATH HEN. 

By Hon. W. C. Adams. 



I was greatly interested in reading 
about your plans for experimental work 
with American game birds in place of 
your customary annual dinner, and noth- 
ing would give us greater pleasure than 
to help you in this if it were in our 
power. On the matter of the heath hen, 
however, in view of the present condi- 
tion of the colony it would be most un- 
wise for us to use any of these birds 



for purposes of experiment, as I think 
you will readily see. The situation in 
regard to the heath hen is this : as you 
probably know, under the protection 
given these birds for some years past, 
they increased until there was a sub- 
stantial colony on Martha's Vineyard, 
and it appeared that the future of this 
bird was practically assured. In the 
spring of 1916 a disastrous fire swept 



44 



THE GAME BREEDER 



over the reservation, about nesting time, 
which resulted in greatly diminishing 
their numbers, either directly at the time 
of the fire, or indirectly by exposing the 
birds to the attacks of vermin on ac- 
count of the destruction of their covers. 
The following report from the State 
Ornithologist, under date of September 
28, 1917, shows that the birds have so 
decreased in numbers that not only must 
the most careful protection be given 
them in their present habitat, but all 
thought of removing birds from the 
island must be given up for some time 
to come, for every bird is needed now 
for breeding, and this will go on best 
on their accustomed grounds : 

"I returned yesterday from Martha's Vine- 
yard, where I had time to spend but one day. 
If I were to judge from my one day's work 
and the observation of the superintendent, 



I should say that the heath hen is now 
fewer in numbers than at any time within 
the last nine years. I was able to find 
but two birds, and I believe it has been nine 
years since I have had such an experience, but 
of course the number of the birds cannot be 
judged from the experience of one man in 
one day. 

"I also went over the field where the birds 
feed, but did not see a bird there. I crossed 
and re-crossed the alfalfa field a great many 
times, looking to see if I could find any place 
where the birds had nestled or fed. I did not 
find a spot, although there were a few plants 
from which a few of the leaves had been 
nipped by something. This is remarkable, as 
the birds are fond of alfalfa, but I could not 
start a bird in the field. It seems quite pos- 
sible that the birds are now down to about the 
point that they were when the commission first 
took hold of the work of protecting them. If 
that is so there will be very few next spring 
at the beginning of the breeding season." 

I think the above report will tell its 
own story. 



MUSIC AND FOOD. 

By the Editor. 



Orchard Hill, Rhinebeck, N. Y., 

March 29, 1918 
My Dear Mr. Huntington : — 

Mr. Dows and Mr. Strong have handed me 
your letters of March 22 for reply in my 
capacity as Secretary of the Rhinebeck Bird 
Club. 

The desire for continued protection on the 
quail as expressed in the columns of the 
Rhinebeck Gazette, is merely the sentiment of 
residents in this neighborhood as shown in a 
long petition which they forwarded to the 
Conservation Commission in Albany. There 
may be farmers who wish to shoot quail and 
there may be others who, like yourself, would 
not buy a place on which they could not shoot 
quail. I can merely say that I have not met 
them about Rhinebeck. In this neighborhood, 
which is chiefly an agricultural community, 
the farmers look upon quail as among their 
best friends, and they long for the day to re- 
turn when the sound of their cheery whistle 
mav again be common in their fields. 

One might almost gather from your letters 
that all that is necessary to bring back the 
quail is for the farmers to plant plenty of 
currant bushes and protect the resulting nests. 
Our experience is that in spite of protection 
the bird is having great difficulty in holding 
its own, and so far as nesting "quite close 
together" in a wild state is concerned, our 



observations of the pugnacity of the males and 
of the habits of the birds in general make 
such a hope in this part of the country very 
remote. 

Very truly yours, 

Clinton G. Abbott, 
Secretary Rhinebeck Bird Club. 

The letters referred to by Mr. Abbott 
were written to The Editor of The 
Rhinebeck Gazette, who wrote us, send- 
ing a clipping from his paper about the 
work of the bird club and to Mr. Dows, 
one of our Rhinebeck readers, explain- 
ing that he believed it would be better to 
encourage the production of quail than 
to enact laws preventing such industry. 
There can be no doubt that a country 
place where it is legal to produce food 
is more valuable than one where such 
food production is criminal. We have 
records of people who were about to pur- 
chase farms who decided not to do so 
when the State game department ad- 
vised them that it was illegal to produce 
quail for sport or for food. 

Our objection is to the kind of "pro- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



45 



tection" proposed by the bird society, 
which in effect makes criminal the prac- 
tical protection of quail which is quite 
necessary to make and keep the birds 
plentiful. It does not contemplate the 
planting of berry bushes and other briars 
and the purchase of stock birds for 
breeding purposes which we have found 
effective. 

Professor Pearson, secretary of the 
Audubon Society, in a letter which we 
published, said he believed farmers and 
land owners should have the same right 
to produce game birds for profit as they 
have to produce a pig. Protection laws 
such as are proposed by the bird society 
destroy the right to produce quail for 
food, for sport or for profit and undoubt- 
edly they tend to decrease the value of 
the land ; to prevent some people from 
living in the country. I was perfectly 
sincere in saying I would not live on a 
country place where it is illegal to shoot, 
eat, or sell a game bird. There are many 
people who can be induced to live in the 
country where there is no danger of ar- 
rest for producing food on the farm. 
There are plenty of country places in 
America where no game occurs at pres- 
ent which can be utilized to produce a 
big head of game. 

As to birds nesting quite close together 
there is nothing new in the idea. The 
gray partridges are fighters but there are 
thousands of records of partridge nests 
in the hedges and in corn quite close 
together; the pheasants are known fight- 
ers but there are plenty of similar rec- 
ords of pheasant nests close together. 
We have succeeded in inducing quail to 
nest quite close together in safe places 
and. all people who preserve game know 
that wild pheasants and partridges often 
lay eggs in the same nest. There has 
been much discussion about this in the 
English books and magazines. We re- 
cently had a big lot of quail eggs hatched 
for us under hen quails which nested in 
a wild state, quite close together. 

We can readily understand how it is 
that people, who put in their time pro- 
curing long petitions and forwarding 
them to the Conservation Commission 
urging laws preventing the production of 



quails by proper methods, do not have 
any time to study the habits of birds 
made abundant under favorable condi- 
tions, when it pays to create such con- 
ditions. Audubon and all the other orni- 
thologists praise the quail highly as an 
article of food. We endorse their opin- 
ions. There can be no doubt that the 
quail whistles for a short time in the 
breeding season but we believe and know 
there will be ten quails whistling on the 
fences where there are one or none to- 
day when the farmers are told how easy 
and how profitable it is to have an abun- 
dance of quail. 

We do not object to the activities of 
the bird societies when applied to public 
lands. We are aware that some of them 
take in more money every season than 
some of the smaller game farmers do. 
All that we ask is that when they stam- 
pede the legislature (as they too often 
are able to do, having vast revenues at 
their disposal) into enacting closed sea- 
sons when no food can be taken, sold, 
shipped or eaten, that they provide in 
their prohibitive laws that nothing in 
them shall affect honest game farmers 
who would like to produce food on their 
farms or even sportsmen who would like- 
to keep their country places sufficiently 
attractive to induce their boys to spend 
part of the time in the country. 

The historian Lecky well says that 
field sports tend to keep people in the 
country and form a sufficient counter- 
poise to the pleasures of the town. Dr. 
Sweeney, when he was state game officer 
of Indiana, wrote to us that it was far 
better to provide sport for our young 
men in the country than to drive them 
to the town saloons for recreation. 

It is a very easy matter to get long 
petitions signed on any subject when 
plenty of money is expended for plausi- 
ble solicitors. 

We do not think, however, that our 
laws should be made exclusively by bird 
societies even if they spend a lot of 
money getting signatures to petitions 
which too often are obtained under false 
pretenses, since suppresio veri is as bad 
as sioggcstio falsi, as the writers on 
equity say — the holding back of the truth 



40 THE GAME BREEDER 

about any important matter is as vicious birds and to donate a little land to their 

as falsehood. use unless it pays to- do so. Those who 

Will a farmer sign a petition to pre- take a real interest in birds which are 
vent his neighbor from rearing any kind good to eat easily can have plenty of the 
of food for profit on his land if he is highly desirable food and when the food 
told that the right to do this always in- is made plentiful no doubt there will 
creases the value of the land, when game be plenty of music. The abundant sing- 
is the crop introduced and cultivated, ers may help some by eating weed seeds 
Certainly not. There are records where and insects. If, as the farmers are told, 
the value of the land has been more than the birds are beneficial why should laws 
doubled. Will a farmer sign a petition be enacted preventing them from making 
to prevent him or his neighbor from the beneficials profitably plentiful and 
having plenty of quail to eat if he is told keeping them so. Why say they may have 
that he can do so easily and that the crop pheasants but not quails ? Are not laws 
will be profitable? which say in effect say you may have 

The petitions usually are signed by red birds but not brown ones ridiculous ? 

people who do not wish to entertain Especially when the naturalists say that 

trespassing shooters and who are led to the indigenous birds are highly desirable 

believe that the only way to stop them is for food and are beneficial to agricul- 

to prohibit sport. The average farmer ture. Would it not be far better if the 

we are sure is going to vote right when bird societies would make some prac- 

the matter is properly presented at the tical experiments with the food birds than 

polls, as it no doubt will be some day. We to put in their time securing laws mak- 

believe the state game departments which ing it criminal for any one to do so 

permit themselves to be run by bird so- profitably? 

cieties are likely to experience something Would it not be a good idea for the 

which happened to the renowned Hump- Rhinebeck Bird Club to tell the farmers, 

ty Dumpty who sat on a wall. "who long for the day to return when 

The New York commissioner recently the sound of the cheery whistle of the 
had the opportunity to close quail pro- quail may again be common in their 
duction on Long Island and to exter- fields," how they quickly can hasten the 
minate the quail there. He was urged coming of the longed for day and that 
to do this by one of the big bird socie- it will be found profitable to do so. 
ties — big financially — although it con- Mr. Abbott says in his letter, "in spite 
tains, we believe, only one member and of protection the bird is having great 
a treasurer to hold the bag. It is said difficulty in holding its own." Why per- 
to take in as much as an hundred thou- petuate the difficulty the causes for 
sand in a year. This amount seems trifl- which are well known to naturalists ? 
ing when compared to the revenues of The better way would be to remove the 
some of the real big bird societies and difficulty. A little practical protection 
protective societies which go in for more which includes a little planting especially 
laws and to the state departments which for the birds, a little protection from 
spend millions of dollars every year in cats and natural enemies and the pur- 
ine effort to save the wild food birds with chase of some stock birds, is all that 
rather bad results, thus far, if we are any is necessary. Laws preventing such in- 
judge of food abundance in the markets, dustry are not creditable to any bird so- 

The game commissioner rightly denied ciety or beneficial to the game or the 

the application to prohibit quail produc- farmer. Laws permitting and encour- 

tion on Long Island. We can see no aging the profitable production of pheas- 

reason why he should not advocate a law ants quickly made America the biggest 

permitting any one to have quail on his pheasant producing country in the world, 

farm in other parts of the state if he Why substitute pheasants for our in- 

wants to. No one can be expected, of digenous birds which quickly can be 

course, to purchase and introduce stock made as plentiful as partridges are in 



THE GAME BREEDER 



47 



the older countries? The country is 
big enough to have all kinds of game in 
abundance, but it is far better to en- 
courage such abundance than to prevent 
it by ill advised legislation. 

Laws making a closed season on poul- 
try would not make the poultry plentiful 
on any farms. Laws similar to those 
advocated by the bird society if applied 
to any animals abundant on the farms 
as food would exterminate such animals. 



It would be far better to expend public 
money in encouraging the production 
of quail and other game on the farms 
than to expend vast sums in executing 
laws prohibiting the production and 
shooting of game a most desirable food. 
The farmers are perfectly right in pro- 
hibiting trespassers from shooting their 
quail. They should not prohibit their 
neighbors from breeding them for profit 
or sport. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 

By Our Readers. 



Rearing Ring-necked and Golden 
Pheasants. 

Mrs. Edgar Tilton. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I have been raising Chinese ringneck 
and golden pheasants for the last four 
or five years. Rhode Island red hens 
hatch the eggs. I keep them in small 
runs with waterproof coop attached. For 
the first week or two I make a soft cus- 
tard, consisting of a well beaten egg 
mixed with two tablespoonfuls of sweet 
milk and baked in the oven. I pour 
boiling water over a small portion of 
Spratt's pheasant food and let it steam 
until it softens. I also have Crissel, a 
preparation of Spratt's, made from meat, 
and the first month I give them no water. 
After that age they are quite hardy and 
I feed Spratt's food and chick grain, 
with chopped onions, lettuce, etc. Adult 
birds are very hardy, small eaters and 
only require a shed open to the south 
with wire fence enclosing the run and 
overhead as well. I have shipped full 
grown birds to South Dakota and eggs 
to Missouri, Ohio and California. Or- 
ders came through my advertising in 
The Game Breeder, but I have never 
shipped day old pheasants. The cost of 
rearing pheasants is very small. 

Texas Game. 

Colonel W. G. Sterett, former State 
Oyster, Fish and Game Commissioner, 



told members of the Legislative investi- 
gating committee, the other day, that 
Texas could have as abundant a supply 
of game and fish as it had before the 
Civil War if proper methods were used 
to propagate them. He advocated plant- 
ing sunflowers in the Western part of 
the State to provide . feed for quail, 
which, he said, thus encouraged, would 
soon become plentiful, and that oyster 
production could be greatly increased. 
He is expected to write out his views on 
the subject, to be incorporated in the 
report which will be made by the investi- 
gating committee. 

Owls Devour Pigs. 

Patriotic Chinaman Loses Ten of 
Them. 

Chemanius, B. C, April 20. — Sam Yik 
Kee, Chinese patriot and pig raiser, is 
distressed and the potential pork produc- 
tion of Canada has been reduced by ten 
fine pigs as the result of the depredations 
of horned owls. 

Sam Yik Kee had ten sturdy little pigs. 
Then there were nine, and he couldn't 
account for the shortage. Next day an- 
other disappeared. Each day thereafter 
the Yik Kee piggery was shy another 
suckling animal. 

After the nine had disappeared the 
Chinaman happened to look upward and 
saw the carcass of one of his choice pigs 
hanging from the limbs of a tree. The 



48 



THE GAME BREEDER 



mystery was solved. He had been rob- 
bed by horned owls. An active war 
is now being waged against the feath- 
ered thieves. — The World. 

Prize Quails. 

Received Gambel quails, which had 
been shipped March 6th, today, Tuesday, 
at 5.20 p.m., seemingly in very good con- 
dition. They're certainly most beauti- 
ful birds. Thank you very much tor 
them. 

Very truly yours, 
Wisconsin. C. W. Siegler. 

Oklahoma City, April 6, 1918. 

The Innocent Cat. 

Captain Darwin. 

In the vicinity of dwellings, there is 
no more dangerous enemy to pheasants 
than the common cat. Captain Darwin, 
in his "Game Preserver's Manual," 
writes as follows : "There is no species 
of vermin more destructive to game than 
the domestic cat. People not aware of 
her predatory habits would never for a 
moment suppose that the household fa- 
vorite that appears to be dozing so in- 
nocently by the fire is most probably un- 
der the influence of fatigue caused by 
a hard night's hunting in the planta- 
tions. How different also in her manner 
is a cat when at home and when detect- 
ed prowling after the game. In the first 
of the two cases she is tame, accessible 
to any little attentions ; in the latter she 
seems to know she is doing wrong, and 
scampers off home hard as she can go. 
Luckily there is no animal more easily 
taken in a trap, if common care be used 
in setting. Box traps, however, with 
drop doors open at both ends, are much 
the most efficacious, as the victims, 
whether cats, dogs, rats and even foxes, 
walk into them without suspicion, and, 
treading on the platform in the middle, 
cause both doors to fall simultaneously, 
when the animal is secured unharmed, 
and may either be liberated or shot into 
a sack and drowned. 

The Use of Poison. 

Laying poisoned meat is now illegal, 
and restrictions are placed upon the sale 



of arsenic by statute ; nevertheless I 
would caution anyone against the use of 
that drug, the employment of which is 
attended with much cruelty, as with 
some animals it is immediately rejected 
by vomiting, but not before it has laid 
the foundation of a violent and painful 
inflammation of the stomach, from which 
the animal suffers for weeks, but rarely 
dies. If it is absolutely necessary to use 
poison for cats, a little carbonate of 
baryta, mixed up with the soft roe of a 
red herring, is the most certain and 
speedy that can be employed, but a good 
keeper should know how to keep his pre- 
serves clear of vermin without the aid 
of poison.'' — Tegetmeier on Pheasants. 



Dogs and Cats. 

By M. T. Richardson. 

I have noticed an article on the dif- 
ferent effects the explosion of shells had 
on a cat and on a dog, as reported by 
the correspondent of some daily paper. 
The first thought is why does an ex- 
ploding shell frighten a dog when it 
does not frighten a cat? 

Some years ago I had a Scotch Col- 
lie and he nearly went into convulsions 
when there was a thundershower and 
the thunder was rolling severely. He 
would crawl under the bed, get into a 
closet and whine until the storm was 
over. What is the explanation? 

In my opinion it comes from the fact 
that all the cat family have broad 
heads, which give them a stability that 
cannot be found in the narrow heads of. 
a large number of dogs. It is my opin- 
ion that a bulldog would manifest about 
as much indifference as a cat to the ex- 
ploding of a shell. 

Of course you have noticed that all 
animals which have been created to kill 
other animals have broad heads — the 
lion, the tiger — all of the cat family from 
the house cat up to th§ tiger, and all 
of the carnivorous birds — eagles, hawks, 
owls, etc. 

The house cat with her meek and in- 
nocent face has fooled the human race 
for hundreds of years. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



49 



An Oregon Deer Farm. 
G. D. Gorm. 

Editor of The Game Breeder : 

Last April I bought twelve head of 
deer, natives of this part of Oregon. Six 
of them were bucks and six of them 
does. From five of the does I raised 
eight fawns this year. I have an en- 
closure at present of 70 acres and am 
fencing 80 acres more. At present will 
fence 300 acres in all in the next year. 
I "hope to raise six hundred deer on this 
place. Eighty acres of this land I will 
have in clover and alfalfa hay. Will cut 
two crops, then turn the deer in and 
pasture it off until winter. Then they 
live mostly on browse. I have a beau- 
tiful trout stream running through the 
place. The game business in western 
Oregon will be Very profitable as this 
country is an ideal place to raise deer, 
elk and wild turkeys. The law is fa- 
vorable for game breeding in Oregon. 
I would like to correspond with one of 
your readers who has experience in rais- 
ing wild turkeys. 

Most respectfully, 

G. D. Gorm. 
Oregon. 

[Write to Jno. R. Gammeter, Akron, Ohio, 
Miss Mary Wilkie, Beaver Dam, Va., H. P. 
Bridges, Baltimore, Md., Johnson and Sund, 
Blabon, N. Dak.— Editor.] 

More Dog. 

Albert — I see California has passed 
a law allowing a hunter to hunt with 
one dog. Wonder what would happen 
if he should use a dachshund which you 
know is said to be "a dog and a half 
long." 

Ben — True, the dachshund is a dog 
and a half long but he is only "half a 
dog high," so in reality he is no more 
than one dog. 

Pheasants and Blackbirds. 

"We want to get a suggestion from 
you," one of the pheasant breeders 
writes. "We are simply having the devil 
of a time this year being annoyed by 
black birds, which we have never had 
before. Our ring-necked pheasants are 
in open aviaries or runs, no wire over 



the top" and the minute the ringnecks 
lay a black bird swoops down and eats 
the egg. As you know we cannot shoot 
as that frightens the ringneck and cuts 
off their laying and injures their fer- 
tility. If you can make any suggestion 
in regard to this same will be duly appre- 
ciated." 

[You should have a gun. A Parker double 
barrelled gun or a Remington pump gun can 
be used as in the manner described.] 

The only two remedies I know of for the 
black birds is to cover the pens with netting. 
String netting will do for a season or two, and 
second, the shooting of black birds at a little 
distance from the pens. If you can get a boy 
who is fond of shooting who will shoot light 
loads of smokeless powder at the birds on 
the line of their approach, I think you will 
find that they will soon learn the danger and 
keep away. After a few days shooting it 
might be a good plan to put up a scarce crow 
with a black broomstick in its hand slightly 
concealed in the ambush where the shooting 
has been done. 

The best remedy I have ever seen suggested 
for the pest of English sparrows which eat up 
a big lot of the food in the English pheasant 
pens was to net them out, but I am sure a 
little persistent shooting at any birds will make 
thern wild. I am inclined to think the biggest 
losses are early in the morning. This is the 
time when the crows are most active in steal- 
ing eggs. We had a big lot of crows at our 
Wading River preserve but a little shooting 
early in the morning soon made them very 
wary and we took a good lot with traps. 

I think it would be a good plan for you to 
write to M. J. Newhouse, Oneida Community, 
Oneida, New York, and ask his advice about 
trapping black birds. — Editor.] 

In-breeding. 

A western state game officer wrote to 
inquire about the fertility of quail eggs 
from birds of the same covey. Our opin- 
ion about in-breeding is that it is best 
to separate the birds and to breed birds 
which are not related. In a state of 
nature the covies are much broken up by 
the destruction due to hawks and other 
vermin and the birds, no doubt, find non- 
related mates. On shooting properties 
where the birds are protected against 
vermin the covies are broken up by 
shooting and undoubtedly the birds left 
after the destruction by shooting find 
non-related mates. 

On the foreign preserves partridge 
eggs often are removed from one nest 
and exchanged for those laid in another 



50 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and eggs sometimes are exchanged by 
breeders or game preservers owning dif- 
ferent properties. 

Robert Bill, head keeper to Sir Wil- 
liam Gordon dimming Bart, says eggs 
are constantly changed from one part of 
the estate to another. 

Lord Elphinstone says, "Some eggs 
are lifted and put in other nests." Col. 
A. Trotter says, "eggs are often lifted 
from insecure or forsaken nests and add- 
ed to others." Sir George Houston Bos- 
wall, Bart, writes that "a lot of eggs 
are lifted from impossible places and put 
into other nests. Eggs also are changed 
from one side of the place to another." 
Captain H. Heathcoat Amory writes 
that, "eggs are lifted from the outside of 
the estate and brought into the center to 
fill up nests to 20 or 22 eggs, which 
works well, and often has the advantage 
of changing blood to a certain extent." 

There are many other English records 
indicating that partridge breeders enter- 
tain the opinion that in-breeding is not 
desirable. 

We do not know if eggs produced by 
birds of one covey are apt to be infer- 
tile. We would be inclined to 1 guess that 
they might be fertile but that the progeny 
would be improved by the breaking up 
of the covies by vermin in a state of 
nature or by shooting in places where 
the sportsmen decide to protect the game 
and to shoot the birds which would have 
been destroyed by vermin. 

We wrote a few letters to people we 
thought might know something about 
the subject but we doubted if they could 
inform us as to the fertility of eggs pro- 
duced by birds of one covey. Dr. Her- 
bert K. Job was the only one who an- 
swered our inquiry. He writes: 

"In the matter of which you inquire, 
about the fertility of eggs produced by 
quail that were brother and sister, I have 
no direct data. I happen, however, to 
know this, that in my joint experiment 
with breeding canvasbacks on the Wil- 
liam Rockefeller estate, under my friend 
Arthur M. Barnes, the mother canvas- 
back mated with one of her sons, pro- 
duced fertile eggs, and raised young in 
1916. Next year, 1917, they bred again, 



apparently the same birds, but that time 
the young seemed to lack vitality and 
died quite early. This may have been 
due to in-breeding, but one instance 
would hardly settle the point. It is evi- 
dent that young can be raised from mem- 
bers of the same family, but it is clearly 
best not to press this too far, but to in- 
troduce new blood." 

In California we have been told that 
covies which were not broken up some- 
times did not separate ' in the spring 
and the birds apparently did not breed. 

The truth of the matter is, however, 
that game breeding is in its infancy in 
America and we all know comparatively 
little about it and have a great deal to 
learn. The problems of game breeding 
are properly discussed in The Game 
Breeder, the only magazine devoted ex- 
clusively to the interests of game breed- 
ers, and we shall be glad to have our 
readers discuss this problem or any 
other in which they are interested. 

The Game and The Farmer. 

A western farmer writes to The Game 
Breeder : "I don't want to see good 
food producers made criminals through 
special privilege laws." 

The idea that state game departments 
should arrest farmers for having stock 
birds in their possession for breeding 
purposes is vanishing rapidly and when 
the farmers generally realize that they 
should have the right to produce any 
kind of plant or animal on their farms 
without being arrested we believe the 
legislator who opposes them quickly will 
retire to private life. 

Our correspondent says there is a 
move on in the western agricultural 
states and men will be sent to make 
laws for the people who now have very 
little representation in the government 
of the states. 

Laws which prevent the profitable 
breeding of game undoubtedly tend to 
decrease the value of the farms since a 
farm where a high-priced food can be 
produced is worth more than one where 
such industry is criminal. 

Since it is legal to post the farms 
against shooting, and most of the farms 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 



are posted, sport has nothing to fear 
from the farmers who may make the 
game profitably plentiful or who may 
rent the right to shooting clubs to pro- 
duce and shoot the wild food birds. 

The farmers who have been stamped- 
ed into putting the quail on the song 
bird list in Ohio, Iowa, Wisconsin, 
Michigan and other states should know 
that they have prevented themselves 
from producing birds which sell readily 
for $20 and $30 per dozen and which 
lay eggs worth $6.00 per dozen. When 
they learn that these birds can be pro- 
duced abundantly at a very small cost, 
since they find their food in the fields 
and woods, and only need a little spe- 
cial planting and protection in order to 
become abundant, we believe the farmers 
easily can be stampeded in the direction 
of making laws permitting them to pro- 
duce the food for profit. 

Sport Lovers Form Outdoor Life Club. 
Miroc Lodge, Name of New Organiza- 
tion — Hunting and Fishing Objects. 

The formation of a large social organ- 
ization by Minneapolis men for the pro- 
motion of outdoor life and sport was 
made known yesterday in the incorpora- 
tion of the Miroc lodge. The lodge is 
capitalized at $25,000. 

The site of the lodge, which will be 
devoted to hunting, fishing, trapping and 
other outdoor sports, has not been decid- 
ed upon. The officers of the club have 
two places in mind south of this city, 
but have made no decision. 

Robert M. Laird is president of the 
Miroc lodge; H. R. Shepardson, vice- 
president; C. M. Odell, treasurer, and 
H. K. Zeppinger, secretary. There are 
17 directors. 

More than 150 local men have joined 
the club. According to Clinton M. 
Odell, there will be no limit to the mem- 
bership. As soon as the site is deter- 
mined upon it is planned to start work 
on a suitable clubhouse. 

Directors and officers of the Miroc 
lodge stated that there will be a hunting 
preserve as well as one of the biggest 
trap shooting ranges in the state. Most 
of the members of the club are members 



of the Minnesota Game and Fish Pro- 
tective League and part of the work of 
the club will be to better the conditions 
of game birds. — Minneapolis Tribune. 

Quails Plentiful; Eat With Chickens. 
No Meatless Days Foreseen in North- 
east Oklahoma. 

Bartlesville, Okla., Oct. 6. — Quail are 
so plentiful in this section this fall and 
are becoming so tame the "Bob Whites" 
are coming into the city. Most any 
morning they can be seen flying around 
the residence streets or eating in chicken 
yards. 

Hunters do not want to see the season 
closed on quail, but farmers and others 
do. Hunters argue that there are more 
quail this season than ever before and 
that if the game laws are rigidly en- 
forced as to pot hunting, killing them 
out of season and killing more than 
the number in a day, not many will be 
killed in a season. On the other hand, 
farmers are driving home an argument 
that will likely do more to have the sea- 
son closed on quail than any one thing. 
Farmers argue that the government and 
the country need the crops ; that quail 
do more to save crops from attacks by 
bugs and insects than any one thing, and 
that "Bob Whites" are the greatest 
friends of farmers. 

There will be no meatless days for 
many people in this city and county not 
so long as there are plenty of squirrels 
and rabbits to be had. Hundreds of 
squirrels are being bagged and soon the 
rabbit season will be on in earnest. Ducks' 
are coming in in large flocks. So meat 
and pork can be stricken from the daily 
meals of many homes and there will be 
no complaint. 

They May Be War Birds. 

Washington, Feb. 5. — The Army Sig- 
nal Corps has requested the public to re- 
frain from shooting pigeons. 

Many complaints have been made that 
carrier pigeons of the racing homer type 
have been shot by hunting expeditions, 
and the important work of training the 
birds for military service has been se- 
riously interfered with. Army pigeons 
are labeled "U. S. A.-18." 



52 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Roast Pigeons. 

One of the British divisions, General 
Kuhn relates, which was occupying a sec- 
tor of the French front, had as its near- 
est neighbor a unit from Portugal. The 
Portuguese troops had no carrier pig- 
eons, so the British commander decided 
to make them a gift of some birds to act 
as dispatch carriers when other methods 
of communication were put out of com- 
mission. Six dozen or more birds were 
sent over by a detachment of Tommies 
who neglected or were unable to explain 
their use, because of lingual difficulties, 
and the British command was very much 
surprised to receive a note from the Por- 
tuguese officers' mess the next day say- 
ing that the pigeons had been roasted 
and proved a most welcome addition to 
trench fare. 

♦ 

Dogs in School. 

Fort Leavenworth, Kan., Jan. 26. — 
The training of dogs for war service in 
Europe started here recently when Lieut. 
W. L. Butler and a squad of twenty- 
seven men came in. They will train 
Airedale and other breeds of dogs to 
carry messages to the various firing 
lines. They will also train pigeons for 
similar service. As the dogs and pig- 
eons are trained they will be sent over 
to France. 

Grabbed by Germans. 

Chicago, 111., April 24. — Adolph Lein- 
burger registered today as an alien Ger- 
man enemy. He is thirty-four years old, 
black as a hoodoo cat. "I am a Pullman 
porter," said he. "I was born in Ham- 
burg and my parents are there now. My 
grandfather was grabbed in Africa by 
Germans." — The World. 



Partial Report of Minnesota State 
Game Farm. 

August 1, 1916, to November 15, 1917. 

The following report is not complete, 
for the reason that almost one-third of 
the applicants to whom pheasant eggs 
were shipped during the past summer 
have not as yet sent in reports as was 
promised when applications were filed. 

The Game Farm was started January 



1; 1916, on a small scale by the Minnesota 
Game Protective League and a short time 
later the State Game and Fish Depart- 
ment became interested by supplying 
prairie chickens or pinnated grouse and 
quail for experimental work and paying 
the salary of keepers. A report was 
made to the state August 1, 1916, cover- 
ing the work accomplished to that date. 
Although the state did not take over the 
full control of the farm until May 1, 
1917, this report is made for the pe- 
riod beginning August 1, 1916, so that 
those reading the reports may get a full 
conception of the work to date. 

It will be noticed in comparing the last 
and this report that there were less quail 
on hand to breed from during 1917, than 
there was in 1916; this condition being 
due to carelessness on the part of the 
gamekeepers during the winter of 1916- 
17 in giving the quail too long a period 
before trapping them up for wing clip- 
ping; consequently the majority scattered 
out and' flew to the mainland, making it 
necessary to start all over again this 
year. If the quail reared this year can 
be successfully wintered over for breed- 
ing next spring, enough birds can be 
reared to start distribution of this spe- 
cies the early part of the fall of 1918. 

The prairie chicken experiment this 
year was an absolute failure, in that the 
birds did not breed, due to the serious 
mistake of placing them in a small, en- 
closed yard to keep the hawks and owls 
from killing them. When it was found 
that they would not breed they were 
turned out in a large field the same as 
last year, but too late for breeding. 

During the moulting period the latter 
part of the summer, the prairie chickens 
died off, apparently from some diges- 
tive disease. Some quail went the same- 
way, as did a few domestic fowl. The 
experience seems to show that the most 
dangerous period with wild gallinaceous 
birds in captivity is during or immedi- 
ately following the moulting period. The 
experience on the Big Island Game Farm 
may, of course, be different from that 
had by other breeders, but the cause 
seems to be wing-clipping. Even the 
least impeding of flight has caused trou- 
ble with the pinnated grouse. When full- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



53 



winged they are apparently not troubled. 
It may be that much flying exercise is 
needed by the birds when their new 
feathers start growing. All other spe- 
cies of upland birds, including the ruffed 
and sharp-tailed grouse that we have 
had experience with, can balance them- 
selves fairly well when slightly wing- 
clipped, but this is not the case with the 
pinnated grouse, as they become help- 
less when clipped, the same as pheas- 
ants. They are also the most nervous 
of any of the birds we have had expe- 
rience with in captivity, and yet the 
young chickens that were reared last 
year were the tamest. They were full 
winged and almost matured and yet one 
could pick them up at any time. This 
was done with one bird just after it 
had made about a half-mile flight to and 
from the field where it was reared. We 
have not as yet had an even break with 
the prairie chicken in that we have never 
had enough females to give them a fair 
tryout. It has always been a case of 
not taking any chances, for fear of los- 
ing the small number on hand. It is 
hoped that at least thirty pair can be had 
for a real tryout next year. With this 
number chances can be taken in experi- 
menting with them in various ways. 

The work with the pheasants and quail 
during the past season was entirely sat- 
isfactory: On account of not having 
enough of setting hens for pheasant 
eggs incubators were used to take care 
of the surplus eggs not distributed. The 
records following give full information 
as to number hatched, percentages, etc., 
but at the same time it is necessary to 
state that, although the hatch from incu- 
bators was fairly good, the birds so 
hatched were not as strong as those 
hatched under hens ; they are, therefore, 
more subject to contagious diseases and 
the elements. However, the incubators 
come in very handy on the game farm to 
take care of eggs left by bad hens and in 
various other ways. It is not, however, 
advisable for the average individual to 
use incubators except in a tight place 
when a hen wants to leave her eggs. 
The period of incubation of various birds 

(Continued on page 57.) 




Mallard Pin Tail Hybrid. 
Reared by Geo. J. Klein, Ellinwood, Kansas. 

A Late Season. 

The breeding season everywhere 
seems to be very late. There is a big 
demand for game eggs and now is the 
time to send advertisements to The 
Game Breeder. 



Now is the time to advertise young 
birds for summer and fall delivery. 



We would urge those who have pheas- 
ants to sell to offer one day old pheas- 
ants. 

♦ 

An experiment made by the Game 
Conservation Society last year proved 
that young pheasants can be shipped 
safely. Eighteen out of twenty birds 
which were three days in transit arrived 

safely. 

• 

In offering one day old pheasants it 
is wise to sell broods with the hen, which 
hatched them. The young birds bring 
excellent prices and when a hen is 
shipped with the brood the result should 

be satisfactory. 

• 

Those who have had no experience 
with pheasants should learn how to feed 
the young pheasants upon arrival. Ex- 
cellent results have been obtained by 
those who let the hen and young pheas- 
ants range in protected fields and gar- 
dens feeding the young birds very spar- 
ingly and, of course, shutting them up 
at night. 

— ♦ 

Look out for stray cats — a shot gun 
should be kept at hand with a few shells 
ready for instant use. 



54 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Tfe? Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, MAY, 1918. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1,00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



IMAGINATION. 

Du Pont Magazine says imagination 
spells the difference between the blind de- 
tail-doer who, from the economic stand- 
point, dies long before his last breath, 
and the never satisfied delver who lives 
long after he is dead. 

Napoleon said, "Imagination rules the 
world." The Game Breeder imagined 
that America quickly could be made the 
biggest game producing country in the 
world. Rapidly the details are being 
worked out by thousands of intelligent 
breeders with excellent imagination 
about new methods. Some articles of 
especial value written by these readers 
soon will be published. One of the first 
will be the practical experience of a Long 
Island pheasant breeder who says he sel- 
dom loses a bird. 



WHERE ARE THE BUFFALOES? 

The Globe, N. Y., says: 

The question raised by Rudyard Kipling as 
to what the crocodile had for dinner is not in 
the least more important than one that is 
agitating the American Bison Society. For it 
is proposed to kill the herd of nine bison in 
Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, and, as a 
war conservation measure, feed them to the 
bears of the zoo. 

If only the bison were carnivorous the prob- 
lem might be solved by having them eat the 
bears. Or, like the gingerbread dog and the 
calico cat in the Eugene Field poem, the bison 
and the bears might eat each other up. But 



this would hardly satisfy the American Bison 
Society, either. 

Perhaps the suggestion of the president of 
the American Bison Society will solve this 
bristling problem: he suggests a diet of horse 
meat for the bears. 

Thousands upon thousands of dollars 
have been collected in America by offi- 
cers of various game saving societies 
who say, "Where are the buffalo?" Hun- 
dreds and possibly thousands of protec- 
tive game laws have been secured by 
those who have used the question in 
their arguments to legislative commit- 
tees. 

A large herd of the bison, however, 
when offered for sale brought no pur- 
chasers in the United States and the 
herd was sold to Canada and placed in 
a park. The proper place for bison 
is on a range in a large park where 
they can find most of their food. The 
land where we used to shoot them in 
abundance has been sold to cattle and 
sheep ranchers and to farmers, and it 
would be impossible to restore the bison 
as a sporting animal on such areas. 

The attempt to introduce deer and 
to increase their numbers in agricul- 
tural regions is always followed by 
claims for damages against the state. 
The attempt to license trespassers to 
shoot up the quail and other game birds 
on the farms is followed by laws put- 
ting the game birds on the song bird 
list and prohibiting all shooting for a 
term of years, renewed from time to 
time, or forever, as in the recent Ohio 
legislation. 

The times have changed and we must 
change our methods of handling the 
game in settled regions or give up field 
sports altogether in such regions. Many 
posted farms can be used as shooting 
grounds by those willing to deal fairly 
with the owners. Thousands of our 
readers now have an abundance of game 
and look after it properly. Shooting 
syndicates or clubs with small dues can 
have good shooting during long open 
seasons and the vast bays and marshes 
and large areas of mountain, forest and 
uncultivated lands for many years can 
be utilized as shooting grounds for the 
public. The state should encourage 



THE GAME BREEDER 



55 



game breeding for sport and for profit 
on the farms and it should properly look 
after and endeavor to increase the game 
for the public on the public areas re- 
ferred to. 

Our markets rapidly will become 
filled with game for the people to eat 
when the subject of game saving is han- 
dled in a statesmanlike manner. The 
people who eat cheap game will be 
friendly to the sport that produces it. 
Field sports in America can be saved 
and the sporting area can be much en- 
larged provided we encourage all those 
who are willing to do so to deal fairly 
with the farmers and to breed game 
abundantly. 

The Dollar-a-Week Club, promoted 
by the Game Conservation Society, will 
provide excellent shooting for its mem- 
bers. The annual dues, $52 per year, 
were fixed in order to demonstrate that 
those who wish to do so can have good 
shooting for small dues, using land on 
which little or no game occurs at pres- 
ent. The easiest and the best game 
birds and the cheapest to rear are the 
native birds which formerly inhabited the 
region selected by the club. The meat 
secured by the members goes a long 
way towards offsetting the amount of the 
annual dues so that the sport costs little 
or nothing. 

Those who can afford to do so should, 
of course, have thousands of pheasants 
and other hand-reared game. They 
should sell all they can not eat and the 
sales at present prices will produce a 
good annual revenue for any club or 
country place where game breeding is 
properly carried on. 

The Game Conservation Society will 
lend a hand and help any sportsmen who 
may wish to organize game shooting 
clubs. We are not opposed, as often 
we have pointed out, to those who wish 
to collect dues from sportsmen in or- 
der to create quiet refuges where no 
one can shoot. There is so much land 
in America that all plans for game sav- 
ing can be carried out. But we like 
the noisy places more than posted farms 
without shooting. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor, The Game Breeder : 

I want to thank you for your favor 
of the 3rd instant relative to your ex- 
perience in the breeding of quail. I as- 
sure you that you offer some suggestions 
there which are valuable, and I take it 
from your letter that while you think it 
very possible, or even probable, that fer- 
tile eggs can be produced by in-breeding 
of quail, but you really believe the bet- 
ter way is to cross flocks. 

Again assuring you that I appreciate 
your information and stand ready at 
any and all times to cooperate with 
you, I am, 

Very truly yours, 

G. A. Smith, 

State Game and Fish Warden. 



More Rabbits. 

Great Britain and Ireland consume 
30,000,000 rabbits as food annually — 
Telegram. 

• 

Corn for Wild Turkeys. 

The cold weather last fall caught 
many Center County, Pa., farmers in 
the midst of corn husking, and early 
snow in December made it impossible 
to get in the corn, with the result that 
a large number of farmers still have 
corn in the field, and it is very prob- 
able that because of this fact many game 
birds in Center County have been able 
to survive the severe winter instead of 
perishing with the cold or for lack of 
food. 

An investigation shows that almost 
every ear of corn on the outer stalks of 
the shock has been picked clean of grain, 
only the bare cob remaining. Flocks of 
wild turkeys have been seen and they all 
appeared in a good, healthy condition. 
Pheasants have also been seen, looking 
none the worse for the severe winter. — 
The World, N. Y. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



Pup Wanted. 

"Listen, ma," said Johnny Cupp. 
"Let's trade baby for a pup." 
When his mother said: "No, sir!" 
Johnny made a face at her. 



"T: 



56 



THE GAME BREEDER 




The Dog in the Manger. 

The Game Protectionist takes in a lot of money but often puts birds which he don't eat 

on the song bird list. 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

Angler and Warden. 

A man walking along a country road 
met a farmer with a fishing pole on his 
shoulder and this conversation followed : 

"Well, did you catch many fish?" 

"Nope, not today, but I caught four- 
teen fine bass yesterday." 

Man, turning back his coat to show 
badge, "Do you know you are talking to 
the game warden?" 

Farmer — "And do you know you are 
talking to the biggest liar in Knox 
County?" 

More Whiskey. 

At an Irish assizes a deaf old lady, 
who had brought an action for damages 
against her neighbor, was being exam- 
ined, when the judge suggested a com- 
promise, and instructed counsel to ask 



what she would take to settle the matter. 

"His lordship wants to know what 
you will take ?" asked the learned coun- 
sel, bawling as loud as he could in the 
old lady's ear. 

"I thank his lordship, kindly," an- 
swered the dame ; "and if it's no incon- 
venience to him, I'll take a little whiskey 
and water." 

More Game. 

A gentleman complimented a lady on 
her improved appearance. 

"You are guilty of flattery," said the 
lady. 

"Not so," replied the gentleman, "for 
I vow you are as plump as a partridge." 

"At first," replied the lady, "I thought 
you guilty of flattery only, but now I 
find you are actually making game of 
me." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



57 



(Continued from page 52.) 
has a wide range, mainly due to their 
different temperatures. When more is 
found out about these variations in tem- 
peratures of the game birds, it may be 
that incubators can be so arranged that 
they can be made to produce better re- 
sults. 

A great interest was taken in the dis- 
tribution of pheasant eggs for the first 
time by the state and the demand for 
eggs could not be supplied. The success 
of those who received eggs was fairly 
good, considering that it was the first 
experience that almost all had in hatch- 
ing and rearing pheasants. Quite a 
number blamed their failures on infer- 
tile eggs. This could not have been 
the trouble in all cases reported, as re- 
ports from others more successful show, 
and as does the report of hatching on 
the game farm. Most of the trouble, as 
reports show, was that many of the hens 
used were not free from mites and in- 
sects. In some cases the kind of nests 
and coops used were not suitable. The 
loss of birds hatched by individuals can 
be attributed to the following causes : 
open coops and yards, allowing young 
birds to get away from the hen too soon ; 
tramped by heavy hens ; wrong kind and 
too much feed ; fouled ground ; pet dogs 
and cats; lice and mites; weasel, and 
one report stating that English spar- 
rows killed three young pheasants. 

In but very few instances we"? in- 
structions followed carefully and in these 
few very good results were obtained. One 
individual reared 25 out of a hatch of 
28 birds. Another had a hatch of 24 
birds out of 30 eggs. One distributed 
his eggs to neighbors and kept tab on 
them, reports 105 birds reared out of a 
hatch of 136 birds. This is the best re- 
port in number of birds reared from any 
consignment of eggs. 

Vermin or Predatory Species Killed. 

August 1, 1916, to November 15, 1917. 

HAWKS. 

Sparrow 29 

Copper 19 

Broad-winged 16 

Red-tailed 14 

Goshawk 26 

Sharp-shinned 4 



Ferruginous rough-legged. 1 

Prairie; Falcon 1 

OWLS. 

Great Horned 71 

Barred 16 

Screech 9 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Weasel 9 

Crows 12 

Mink 3 

Redheaded Woodpeckers. *65 

House Rats *215 

Garter Snakes . *550 

^Estimated. 



Ducks Eat Substitutes. 

Ducks, as well as humans, must eat 
substitutes. 

Small potatoes, too small in fact for 
the farmer to have paid any attention 
to ordinarily, are said to have solved the 
problem when mixed with carrots and 
other materials, minus wheat. 

"No wheat is to be used for duck feed- 
ing," said W. B. Ayer, Oregon Food 
Administrator. "Substitutes must be 
found, and I am told that patriotic own- 
ers of duck lakes have discovered a rem- 
edy and have applied it. They are pay- 
ing high prices for small potatoes which 
in former days would not have been dug 
at all. These they are mixing with oth- 
er materials and the ducks are thriving 
on them." 

♦ ■ 

New Sporting Weekly. 

The first issue of the National Sports 
Weekly has just made its appearance in 
time to catch the opening of the baseball 
season. 

It is published and edited by Shepard 
G. Barclay. 

The new weekly features baseball, 
billiards, golf, tennis, automobiling, trap- 
shooting, hunting, fishing, boxing, rac- 
ing and other branches of clean sport. 



Muskrats in Bohemia. 
Introduced into Bohemia twelve 
years ago, the American muskrat has 
spread over a wide area and now is re- 
garded as a serious pest, the government 
advocating the destruction of the animals 
wherever found. 



58 



THE GAME BREEDER 




PEINCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT" fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. H. DOWNS 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Pheasant and Mallard Eggs for Spring delivery from 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



" Miraei Wild Ducks 

=^JJ u I u : 1 1 1 1 1 .' r. 1 1 1 1 1 N n i : 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 : i i 1 1 1 1 i i r; 1 1 r i ; i : i .' i f : i ; . : 1 1 i r i i ; i . ■ ! ! ; i ■■ i ■ ■ .' ■ i ■ i ■ ; . ! . - : 1 1 ■ ; i .■ 1 1 1 ; l i 1 1 n 1 1 ■; 1 1 n i l i I M 1 1 : ! . 1 1 i i 1 1 J ; yj 

Plant wild rice now and have a natural jj 

feeding ground that will attract and hold 1 

wild ducks on your waters next fall. Terrell's § 

damp seeds grow — storage process approved by §1 

U. S. Deptof Agric. Now ready for shipment, jj 

Booklet free. Plant now. 

CLYDE B. TER.KELL, Naturalist 
Dept. P-34 Oshkosh, Wis. 



^ut>^uu^>^j^&^Vc^ r 'fXY^Ti)iiitii'rNii(i iuMi::;iji)iitiij^MiriJMfjiiiJUifi»}iMii>llJirifuirj|lj|lFXIIEillfif(fflII9fril}|FffJllIIHfilEiliJlfJirfjrHllt}llIIHIljnTII[fl[Mtlt[f^ 




Phone, 9286 Farragut 



FINE FURS 



JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks- 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

SOc a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S-, 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



59 



PHEASANT EGGS 

AND 

ONE DAY OLD PHEASANTS 

For Spring and Summer Delivery 
Pheasant Eggs $5.00 per dozen. One Bay Old Pheasants $8.00 per dozen. 

THE CEDARS 

A. BRADLEY OSSINIING (R. P. D.), IN. V. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD l SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

1 am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



RAISE MALLARDS 

Eggs for Hatching — Manitoba Stock 

Setting $3.00 

Hundred ......... 20.00 

Strong Flying Birds— Prompt Delivery 

HEMLOCKS GAME FARM 

P.O. Box No. 1011 Bridgeport, Conn. 



Yama Brook Trout 



Hi 

ft 



Scientifically bred by the Darwinian 
theory for vigor, quick growing to large size 
and to produce a large number of eggs — 
absolutely free of disease, frequently thriv- 
ing where others die. 

Information in reference to trout breed- 
ing and keeping cheerfully given by our 
trout culturist. 

Scientific examination made of your con- 
ditions for keeping trout at moderate charge. 

We have on hand for stocking 1,500,000 
Yama Trout from fry to 2 lbs. Eggs in 
seaaon. 

YAMA FARMS 

Napanoch, Ulster County, N. Y. 



WILD TURKEY EGGS 

$15.00 PER DOZEN UNTIL MAY 1st 
$12.00 PER DOZEN AFTER MAY 1st 

These eggs are from true Wild Turkeys. Orders filled in 
the order in which they are received. 

MARY C. WILRIE, Beaverdam, Virginia 



la writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letter*: "Yours for More Game." 



60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



£■%£ 



M 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
: and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 



R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $I.SO per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGE- 
MENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., REQUIRED 
BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912, 
OF THE GAME BREEDER, published monthly at 
New York, N. Y., for April 1, 1918. 
State of New York, County of New York, ss: — 
Before me, a notary public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared D. W. Hunting- 
ton, who. having been duly sworn according to law, 
deposes and says that he is the Editor of The Game 
Breeder, and that the following is, to the best of 
his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the 
ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the 
circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the 
date shown in the above caption, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in section 443, 
Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse 
of this form, to wit: 1. That the names and addresses 
of the publisher, editor, managing editor, and busi- 
ness managers are: Publisher, The Game Conservation 
Society, Inc., ISO Nassau St., New York. N. Y.; 
Editor, D. W. Huntington, ISO Nassau St., New York, 
N. Y.; Managing Editor, None; Business Managers, 
The Game Conservation Society, Inc., ISO Nassau 
St., New York, N. Y. That the owners are: (Give 
names and addresses of individual owners, or, if a 
corporation, give its name and the names and ad- 
dresses of stockholders owning or holding 1 per cent 
or more of the total amount of stock.) The Game 
Conservation Society, Inc., 150 Nassau St., New York, 
N. Y. ; Stockholders: C. B. Davis, Grantwood, N. J.; 
A. A. Hill (Deceased), F. R Peixotto, 55 John St., 
New York, N. Y.; J. C. Huntington, ISO Nassau 
St., New York, N. Y. (at present U. S. Ship Mont- 
gomery, in service); D. W. Huntington, 150 Nassau 
St., New York, N. Y.; Dwight Huntington 2nd, Ft. 
Houston, Texas. 3. That the known bondholders, 
mortgagees, and other security holders owning or 
holding 1 per cent or more of the total amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities are: (If there are none, 
so state.) None. 4. That the two paragraphs next 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 




W! 



rE are now booking 
orders for eggs for 
Spring delivery from 
the following varieties of 
pheasants : Silver. Golden, 
Ringneck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, Mongo- 
lian, Reeves, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Impeyan, 
Soemmering, Manchurian 
Eared, Melanotus, Blackthroated Golden, 
Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff 
Orpington and R. I. Red Fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan, 'and Fancy 
Ducks, and Doves of several varieties. 
Deer, Jack Rabbits. 



DOGS 



Send fifty cents in stamps for 
colortype catalogue. 



CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



HOUNDS-ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
otter for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, beat and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, hiahly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfaciory. L. E. GALLUP, 2200 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 



TWO YOUNG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 

sale. Dog and Bitch. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York jt 



Thousands of Wild Ducks can be lured 
to the lakes, ponds and rivers near you, by providing 
natural feeding grounds for them. TERRELL'S wild 
rice seed is now ready for delivery and planting Depend- 
able seeds, widely known in U. S and Canada. Booklet 
free. CLYDE B. TERRELL, Naturalist, Dept. P-;3, 
Oshkosh, Wi>. 



above, giving the names of the owners, stockholders, 
and security holders, if any, contain not only the 
list of stockholders and security holders as they appear 
upon the books of the company but also, in cases 
whiie the stockholder or security holder appears upon 
the hooks of the company as trustee or in any other 
fiduciary relation, the name of the person or corpora- 
tion for whom such trustee is acting, is given; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain statements em- 
bracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which stock- 
holders and security holders who do not appear upon 
the bocks of the company as trustees, hold stock 
and securities in a capacity other than that of a 
bona fide owner; and this affiant has no reason to 
believe that any other person, association, or cor- 
poration has anv interest direct or indirect in the 
said stock, bonds, or other securities than as so stated 
"by him. — D. W. Huntington (Signature of editor, 
publisher, business manager, or owner). 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day 
of March, 1°18. — Everett W. Jones, Notary Public. 
Certificate filed in New York County 100, Kings 
County No. 41. (My commission expires March 30, 
1918.) 

[Seal.] 



MORE GAME 

AND 

FEWER GAME LAWS 



PHEASANTS and EGGS 

Good, Strong, Healthy Birds and Eggs 
NONE BETTER 

200 Pheasant Eggs at $25.00 per Hundred. 
30 Hen Pheasants at $3.00 Each. 
15 Cock Pheasants at $2.00 Each. 

TRAVERS D. CARMAN, 

c/o The Outlook Co., 381 4th Ave., N. Y. City 



Dogs and Sheep. 

(From the Boston Globe.) 
If we can trust the figures showing 
that there are 282,243 dogs in New 
York State and that 2,951 sheep were 
reported killed by dogs last year, it ap- 
pears that 297,292 of the dogs didn't 
get a sheep. 



A Military Blunder. 

(From Life.) 

"What is this, waiter?" 
"War bread, sir." 

"Hang it! It's too old entirely for 
active service." 



<1h writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



62 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE-GOLDEN PHEASANTS, TWO YEAR 
old stock. Eggs in season. A. M. SHERMAN, Marsh- 
field, Mass. it 

RINGNECKED PHEASANTS $5.50 PER PAIR. EGGS 

3.00 per 12. 1917 hatched Silkies, $2.00 each. Eggs, 

$2.00 per 12. GERHARDT PHEASANTRY, West 

Roxbury, Mass. it 



PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3.25 pe 

nair C^rRpn Winer Teal, fte.nn npr nair. Rln** Winer Tpa 



FOLLOW. 

t ..ils, $3.25 per 

pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wirg Teal, 
$3 75 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 

Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



PHEASANTS — GOLDEN, SILVER, LADY AM- 
herst, Ringneck. Bantams, Japanese Silkies, Buff 
Cochin. "Ringlet" Barred Rocks. All full blood solen- 
did stock. Egg orders booked now. MRS. IVE R 
CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 

PHEASANTS-BREEDING STOCK AND EGGS FOR 

sale. Ringnecks, Mongolians, Silvers, Goldens, Lady 

Amhersts, Reeves, Prince of Wales. ROBINSON BROS., 

AlderAot, Ontario, Canada. 3t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT HENS, 1917 HATCH, $5.00 
each. Matured Silvers and Crosses, $12.00 per pair. 
Crosses are Golden and Lady Amherst. 1917 hatched 
crosses, $4.00 each. F. A. W. SHAW, 565 West 192nd St., 
N. Y. C. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (rot 1 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans. Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

BELGIAN HARES AND FLEMISH GIANTS FOR 

sale. Al stock. C. W. DIXON, 8612 Morgan Street, 

Chicago, 111. ' It 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS—WILD MALLARDS, 
WILD GEESE AND GAME. FOURTEEN VARIE- 
TIES OF STANDARD POULTRY, INCLUDING 
TURKEYS. ALSO ELK. LIST FREE. G. H. HARRIS, 
TAYLORVILLE, ILL. 4 t 



LIVE GAME WANTED 



PHEASANTS WANTED. 
Between two and three hundred field grown young 
ringnecks for breeding purposes. In application 
particulars please quote prices for pairs, trios, and 
cocks and hens separately in such quantity for Fall 
or Winter delivery. Address A. M., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl. Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



GAME EGGS 



I WILL SELL A FEW DOZEN WILD MALLARD 
duck eggs at $2.00 per dozen. Eggs from same flock 
were very fertile last year. J. B. FOOTE, Frederick- 
town, Ohio. 2t 

FOR SALE — RELIABLE UNRELATED FERTILE 

Ringneck Pheasant eges. May, $22.00, June, $20.00 per 

hundred. JOHN BUTLER, Eastern Game Farm, 

Danielson, Conn. Route 1. it 

FOR SALE — PURE BRED CHINESE PHEASANT 

eggs, $3.50 per dozen. E. J. SHUMAKER, Jefferson, 

Oregon. 2t 

PHEASANT EGGS, TWO-FIFTY PER THIRTEEN. 
ELLERMAN, Yankton, S. D. 4t 

ENGLISH RINGNECK, PURE CHINESE AND 

Golden Pheasant eggs, $3.00 per dozen. Silver, Reeves, 

Amherst and Mongolian, $5.00 per dozen. SIMPSON'S 

PHEASANT FARM, Corvaliis, Oregon. at 

FOR SALE— EGGS FROM ELEVEN VARIETIES OF 
pheasants and some birds. MAPLE GROVE PHEAS- 
ANTRY AND PET STOCK, 43 Iden Ave, Pelham 
Manor, New York. 3t 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. 

Chinese Rii gneck pheasant eggs, $3.50 per dozen 
Golden pheasant eggs 50c each. Mrs. EDGAR TILTON, 
Suffern. New York. 4t 

FOR SALE— GOLDEN, SILVER AND RINGNECK 

pheasant eggs. Dr. JOHN M. SATTLER, Bear Creek, 

Wisconsin. 2t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, H ADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 

CHINESE. GOLDEN, MONGOLIAN, REEVES, AM- 
herst, Silver Pheasant eggs from healthy, unrelated 
stock. Shipped the same day they are gathered. New 
Zealand Rabbits, Ringneck Doves, Pigeons, Japanese 
Silky and Buff Cochin Bantam eggs in any quantity 
Three thousand full wing Chinese for fall delivery. 
MARMOT PHEASANTRY, Marmot, Oregon. 3t 

CHINESE PHEASANT EGGS $3.00 PER DOZEN. 
Mrs. G. H. ROBBINS, Hood River, Oregon. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



63 



FOODS 



TO BREED MAGGOTS FOR YOUR YOUNG GAME 
Birds is disgusting because you must dabble in filth. 
Meal worms are the cnoicest insect food obtainable in 
quantity and are perfectly clean, too. They are no trouble 
to keep, since they live in their food, which is bran. If 
you never fed meal worms let me know when you send me 
your first order and I will give you the pointers you should 
know. 500 at $1.00 ; 1,000 at $1.50 ; 5,000 or more, in one 
sh'pment at $1.00 per 1,000. All express prepaid. C. B. 
KERN, 10 East Main Street, Mount Joy, Penna. it 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery. Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lots. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



■D/^v/^\T^"C Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

D\/VJl\.tJ Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St , N. Y 

"OUR FEATHERED GAME," BY D. W. HUNT- 
ington, contains portraits of all American game birds and 
shooting scenes in color. Postpaid $2.00. THE GAME 
BREEDER, 150 Nasiau St., New York. 

RAISE PHEASANTS. BIG MONEY. PLEASANT 
work. Our book on Pheasant Breeding tells how. Pre- 
paid, onlv 75c. FAYTEX CO., 36 Bromfield Street, 
Boston. Mass. it 



GAMEKEEPERS 



WANTED — POSITION AS GAMEKEEPER OR 
care-taker of Shooting Lodge, by married man. Life 
experienced in game breeding, cause of leaving present 
situation Lieutenant going to Europe and closing his 
shooting lodge and deer park. Age 36 years. Can fur- 
nish first-class references. Seven years present place. 
G. SIMPSON, care of Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
N. Y. City. 

GAMEKEEPER -POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 
gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionport, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A. S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

GAMEKEEPER— SITUATION WANTED 

American game breeder with a 15 year experience wishes 
to raise 5000 ringnecks for a private party or State and 
having an incubator and brooder plant. Apply to THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

HEAD KEEPER SCOTCH, WISHES A POSITION 
Small family, four years' good reference from present 
employer, good reason for leaving. Experienced on 
pheasants, quail, wild turkey and mallards. Ten years' 
references in this country. Apply J. C. E„ care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 



POSITION WANTED ON'A SHOOTING PRESERVE 
by a practical and reliable Manager, widely experienced 
here and abroad. Expert on rearing Pheasant, Quail, 
Partridge, Wild Turkeys and Wild Ducks, etc., the man- 
agement of Incubators, also a handler and trainer of 
field and high-class shooting dogs. A capable man to 
show sport, excellent trapper of vermin, a reliable and 
trustworthy all around manager. J. H. W., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, POSITION ON GAME PRESERVE, OR 
poultry farm, to finish my experiments in electrifying 
rlay old game and poultry, which stimulates their growth 
100 per cent ; also to finish my apparatus, that will sex day 
old birds and will tell whether an egg is fertile or not ; if 
fertile, the sex of the bird when hatched out. I am a 
lecturer, demonstrator, and writer on poultry and 
game. 20 vears' experience in America and Europe. 
S. HERBERT, care of Game Breeder, 150 i\assau St.. 
New York 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

G4MEKEEPER.— SITUATION WANTED. — I can 

furnish rjood English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper; can rear thousands of birds, and train 
dogs, &c. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to {Jet a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address i. H., care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 

TRAVERS D CARMAN, c/o THE OUTLOOK, 3814th 
Ave., New York City, wishes to recommend his head 
gamekeeper, who has had life experience on large and 
small estates in raising of pheasants, partridges, wild duck 
and quail. Understands handling and training of dogs for 
hunting and field trials, also care of fish, trapping and 
killing of vermin. Married, age 26, English. For full 
particulars, apply to W. BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, 
Danielson, Conn. it 



MISCELLANEOUS 



200 PHEASANTS WANTED -WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age ot birds. 
R. A. MAXWELL, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED. EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH, ONAWA 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

TWO LARGE MOUNTED MOOSE HEADS. TWO 
ten point Buck Heads. Pair White Swans in glass case. 
Owls, Hawks, Herons, Ducks, Gulls. Curlews, Bitterns, 
Rare Birds. Minks. Weasels, etc. Write soon Prices 
low. DETROIT BIRD STORE, Detroit, Michigan, it 

WANTED - A DOZEN OR TWO OF COTTON TAILS. 

A. E. GODEFFROY, Godeffroy, P.O., Orange Co., 

New York. 2 t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



64 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



BREEDERS' CARDS 




LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ring necks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 
BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

ber of the Game Guild. 




Mem 




GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $6.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 
Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 





H 

America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 



BOOK ON 

DOG DISEASES 
And How to Feed 

Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 





BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 
Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN -^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER 
Villi: Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 





Mallard-Pintail 



EGGS 

FOR SALE— 1,000 PHEASANTS EGGS $15.00 PER 100. 
Also 200 Pheasants. GEO. BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
Englishtown, N. J. 



In 



writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G»m«.' 



Quail, Bohwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest ordeib for Pheasants 
tnd Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
he large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards. Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at> 






tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

l carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 be«r 
Royal Swans of England. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have fiO acres 
of land entirely devoted to ray business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years rilled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay you to do eo. Your visit soUcked. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 



Department V. 




The Remington UMC Improve- 
ment in Shotshells Everybody 
Is Talking About 

THE wetproof development by Remington UMC is a pat- 
ented and exclusive process of waterproofing the shell in 
case, crimp and top wad — sealing it against wet. It makes 
the shells exceptionally firm in the crimp- strong and dependable 
where the average shell is weakest. The wetproof process is 
now applied to all Remington UMC smokless powder shells. 
Wetproof shells do not cost anv more — simplv ask for "Arrow " 
or "Nitro Club" Remington UMC. 

Whether he hunts in the vet countries or not, there is not a sportsman 
amwhere but is welcoming the wetproof developments by Remington 
UMC as a solid contribution to shooting progress. 

Remington UMC Dealers Carry 
Arrow and Nitro Club, 

The wetproof Shells. 



W 



X 



2GGf! 



W'* 0r6SWt ' 



The Remington Arms Union 

Metallic Cartridge Co., Inc. 
Woolworth Bldg., New York City 




■ 



m 



$"Y, (»&<} 




TH E- 



G AN E BBE 



VOL. XIII 



JUNE, 1918 




The- Object of this magazine- is 
to Make- North America the 5iggest 
Gahe Producing Country in the World I] 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field— A Congressional Hearing — Game Breeders 

Objections — Game as Food— An Unfavorable Contrast— Attitude 

of the Audubon Association— An Under Estimate— Oysters, Fish 

and Game — Exciting Prejudice — Game on the Farm and Game 

Politics. 

My Experience With Pheasants - - Thos. F. Chesebrough 

Food for Wild Ducks for Food and for Sport - D. W. Huntington 

My Pheasants Mrs. Martin Almy 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves By Our Readers 

New Places— Importation of Live Quail— Shipping One 
Day Old Pheasants and Ducks — Ducks and Incubators— 
Bobwhites — Mexican Quail — Profits in Eggs — Remarka- 
ble Shipments of Quail - Hen Shortage— Use of Incu- 
bators — Licenses for Aviary Species — Abundance of 
Eggs — Gambell's Quail— Long Island Game Breeders'' 
Association— Chicken Growing Scarce— A Blue Report — 
Good County for Game Breeding Associations— Good 
Work — A Poor Time — Ornithological Fun at the Hearing. 
Editorials— Congress Should Investigate— Ruffed Grouse and 
Game Abundance— Standardizing Bait — Licenses and 
Common Sense — Game as Food. 
Correspondence — Trade Notes, Etc. • 



PUBLISHEO BY 

He GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

MEW YORK CITY U.S.A ^>fj)-/i; 



:Miii!iiMi»!:;!n,i:!H;:i!!iniM!i»!ii!(:;;i;ii::i!:;ii!nrinfHiiiMiiHiiiiiiimiiiiii»iiiiiiiiiiiiii«iii!iiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiHiiniimiiim!i;:ii»,cill 



SPRATPS 

foods for Dogs, Poultryand PetStodk 

We continue to manufacture our foods, but the 
restrictions of the Food Administrator and our 
resolve to conform to the spirit as well as the 
letter of the law makes it increasingly difficult to 
supply the enormous demand. 

We also foresee a period during which most of 
our Dog Foods will have to be sold in a granular 
form. We urge our customers to begin at once 
to make at least a part of their order for 

SPRATT'S 

War Rodnim No. 1 

This has always been a favorite food of 
the expert kennel owners and trainers. 



Write for sample and send 
2c. stamp for "Dog Culture. " 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, N. J. 

San Francisco, Cal. St. Louis, Mo. Cleveland, Ohio Montreal, Canada 

Factory also in London, England 



P 



aif^ wewilirawfgw^ 



THE GAME BREEDER 



65 



lain 



in, .'iii 



» UUBJ 







^gH?'- — "„.'■ ^^^^-» Mr. John B. Burnham, President 01 the American Game Asso- 

ciation, says: "Trapshooting is great practice for both experts 

sitC^-~-~ ' ~~~^^^^^^r^ and beginners and develops crack held shots." 

The Clay Pigeon Knows No Game Laws 

There is no limit of season, law or 
time. There is no long distance jour- 
ney to the shooting grounds. There is 
never the disappointment of not find- 
ing game. 

Trapshooting 

is always ready at every shooting club. Clay 
birds are plentiful — ready with their speedy 
flight and vexing turns to give you more gun 
thrills to the minute than any "feathered 
game" can give. 

Every man — every woman should know 
how to shoot and "hit" what they shoot at. 
The gun club is the place to learn this demo- 
cratic, patriotic sport. Find out how— now. 

Check trapshooting in the coupon — mail it 
to us and get all the facts. 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 



Mark X before subject that interests you 
and Mail This Coupon to 

E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

ADVERTISING DIVISION 
Wilmington G. B. Delaware 




Trapshooting 




Hunting 


Sporting Powders 




Industrial Explosives 


Farm Explosives 


Py-ra-lin Toilet Goods 


Town & Country Paint 


Fabrikoid Upholstery 


Fairfield Rubber Cloth 


Commercial Acids 


Bronze Powder 






Add 




City 




Stat< 









Established 1802 



WILMINGTON 



DELAWARE 



ma 



tf/S//"""*r'"s*//**r,0 



W//M//SA 



a: 



lliMlll 



iia:ii; 



66 



THE GAME BREEDER 




MAKE your showery hunting days this Fall the good 
days for ducks they really ought to be, with the right 
shotshells — Remington UMC Smokeless "Arrow or 
"Nitro Club" Wetproof Steel Lined "Speed Shells." No 
rain can wet them — they stay dry and serviceable as your 
Remington UMC Pump Gun or Autoloading Shotgun. 

Demingtorij 
*^ UMC 

for Shooting Right 

Those finest of shoal-water fowl, the big mallards — ■which 
you can seldom get within gunshot of -when it is calm ana 
fair will then not be so quick to take wing. 

But your shells must be right. Hunting has no worse luck 
than a "water-soaked shell that has swelled and sticks in the 

gun at a critical moment to say nothing of a "miss caused 

by wilting of the turned-over end of the shell. 




THE GAME BREEDER 



67 




ot • 



\ I 



ii?rpw\"& ; | 
Niiiro CliuH 






Remington UMC Smokeless "Arrow and "Nitro Club Wetproof Steel 
Lined "Speed Shells are made completely waterproof by a wonderful process, 
invented for them and used exclusively in tbeir manufacture. It took tbree 
years to perfect this process. 

The result is a shell tbat -will work right through the gun and 
sboot right tbrougbout an all-day downpour — keeps bard 
and smootb as glass, witb no softening of tbe turned-over 
end or bulging of tbe top wad, m tbe wettest coat pocket. 

In black powder, buy tbe old reliable " New Club, now 
Wetproof sealed at turnover and top wad. 

Sold by Sporting Croods Dealers in Your Community. 

Clean and oil your gun with REM OIL. the combina- 
tion Powder Solvent. Lubricant and Rust Preventive 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION 
METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the World 



\Voolwortb Building 



New York 




68 



THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR BUSINESS IS 

MAKING GUNS 




For over 50 years we have made big 
guns, little guns, good guns— The "OLD 
RELIABLE " Parker Guns. 

Send for Catalogue and 20 Bore Booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROTHERS meriden, conn., u. s. a. 

NEW YORK SALESROOMS, 32 WARREN STREET 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



One Day Old Pheasants 



The Levana Game Farm offers for sale 
one day old Pheasants* Broods will be 
shipped with the hen which hatched 
them* Write for prices, & jfi &. jfi 

GEORGE, BEAL, Head Gamekeeper 

LEVANA GAME FARM 

R. F. D. 1, ILnglisHtown, New Jersey 



Iw writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. ]u)f g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME XIII 



JUNE, 19 i 8 

C°D 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 3 



A Congressional Hearing. 

The most important matter to be sur- 
veyed this month is the hearing before 
the Congressional committee on the Dis- 
trict of Columbia on a bill to prohibit the 
sale and the having in possession of all 
species of game in the District. 

As usual the bill was so poorly written 
that members of the committee expressed 
a doubt about its meaning. Fortunately 
the committee was advised that the bill 
would close a good market to desirable 
food produced by industry. 

Game Breeders' Objections. 

The game breeders who now own mil- 
lions of game birds, and soon will sell 
as many every season, have objected and 
seriously continue to object to the in- 
crease of legal absurdities creating many 
new crimes which seem to be intended 
to put an end to a food producing indus- 
try of economic importance to all of the 
people. There was a time when the hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars invested 
annually in getting new game laws 
caused the game law industry to over- 
shadow the game producing industry, 
but this is not so to-day. The producers • 
now far outnumber those actively en- 
gaged in procuring more game laws, and 
the amounts invested in stock birds, eggs, 
appliances, etc., are much larger than the 
amounts invested in procuring more 
game laws although the amount invested 
in the game law industry is tremendous. 
Those who now produce game in most 
of the States do so by reason of amend- 
ments they have secured to the restric- 
tive game laws. In some states these 
amendments only permit the production 



of certain species of game. It is sig- 
nificant that such species rapidly have 
become plentiful and that the grouse and 
quail rapidly have vanished. All game 
breeders know that our quail and grouse 
can quickly be produced in vast numbers 
just as partridges and grouse are pro- 
duced in the older countries as soon as it 
be not criminal to produce such foods on 
the farms and the people learn how to 
produce it. Already there are places in 
America where quail have been made 
tremendously abundant. These birds can 
be produced at a very small expense and 
no good reason can be assigned why the 
game farmers should not sell the food 
they produce in the best markets. 

The objectional features of the bill 
under discussion appear in its title, "To 
prohibit killing, trapping, netting, en- 
snaring, hunting, having in possession 
and sale of certain wild birds in the 
District of Columbia." 

Game as a Food. 

The Congressmen evidently seem to 
be aware that game is a highly nutri- 
tious and palatable food. Audubon and 
all of the other ornithological writers 
have expressed this opinion. Mr. 
Wheeler, a member of the committee, 
properly exclaimed, "Well, I would like 
to have a woodcock once more before 
I die." We can assure Mr. Wheeler 
that he will eat many woodcock provided 
Congress does not make it a crime for 
the farmer or sportsman who produces 
these birds to dispose of the result of 
his industry. We know places in Amer- 
ica where the woodcock already are 
breeding in good numbers because they 



70 



THE GAME BREEDER 



receive the practical protection given to 
other game. Woodcock are sold as food 
in the English markets. 

It is said that some species of game 
are somewhat beneficial to agriculture. 
The game breeders, conceding the fact, 
insist that it should not be a criminal of- 
fence for any one to keep the species 
profitably plentiful in his field or gar- 
den. It would be wise for the Congress 
not to destroy the incentive to produce 
food by enacting a law making it a 
crime to have the stock birds for breed- 
ing purposes or the food "in possession." 
The bill should be amended so as to per- 
mit and encourage the sale of all species 
produced by indutsry. 

An Unfavorable Contrast. 

The game law enthusiasts, who ap- 
peared before the committee, have se- 
cured thousands of State laws prevent- 
ing food production but the result of such 
laws has not been good. In striking 
contrast to the efforts of those who wish 
to make the District of Columbia a food 
prohibition area are the efforts and in- 
dustry of thousands of food producers 
— the number rapidly is increasing. 
These men and women now produce mil- 
lions of game birds and eggs and they 
respectfully urge the Congress not to 
close one of the best markets to their 
food products. They have added to the 
value of farms and in many cases they 
pay all the taxes on lands and buildings 
of many poor farmers. 

Attitude of the Audubon Association. 

The National Association of Audubon 
Societies, a highly reputable and influen- 
tial organization, fortunately sent a rep- 
resentative to the hearing who knows 
something about the natural causes for 
the ir crease and decrease in the numbers 
of any soecies of birds suitable for hu- 
man food ; who knows, in fact, how easy 
it is to make any species of game profit- 
ably plentiful and who knows the futility 
of laws preventing any one from looking 
after the game properly as it must be 
looked after if it is expected to survive 
in populous regions. 



Dr. Herbert K. Job, who represented 
the Audubons, well said : 

"I want to add a word, if I may, in regard 
to the propagation of game. I have a Govern- 
ment Bulletin here, "Disposition of Game 
Reared in Captivity," and here is a paragraph 
which says, 'About two-thirds of the States 
now have some special provision regulating 
the possession, sale or export of game raised 
in captivity, and I think, as has been agreed 
upon already, we certainly should have a clause 
in this bill to make that possible. That will 
obviate an objection that has been raised on 
the commercial side of the question. There is 
a good industry being started in our country 
now. There is one advertisement I have read 
recently of a California firm which advertised 
to sell 40,000 eggs of game birds for propa- 
gation purposes, including the ring-necked 
pheasant, several kinds of wild ducks and 
some species of quail. Now when any firm 
can offer for sale 40,000 eggs in one season 
for propagation it does show that the industry 
is getting a footing in this country. It is very 
important not to discourage it and rule out 
good markets here and there, for if we can 
raise some tens of thousands of birds which 
otherwise would not be raised, it is very much 
worth while and will give the country an in- 
creased food supply." 

Mr. Gould — Mr. Chairman, may we 
have the name of that publication put in 
the record in case any of us want to 
refer to it? 

Mr. Job — -The publication is "Game 
Laws for 1917." It can be had from 
the Department of Agriculture. 

Mr. Gould — Then that firm selling 
eggs in California. I think it would be 
a good thing to have that in the record. 

Mr. Job — I am awfully sorry but I 
cannot give that offhand. They adver- 
tise in The Game Breeder, a well known 
little magazine published in New York, 
and they carry an advertisement in every 
spring number. I have read it several 
times, and there are a number of other 
firms — there are a hundred firms — over 
the country who are raising game, 
especially the pheasants and mallard 
ducks and black ducks." 

The reason why quail, grouse and 
other birds beneficial to agriculture are 
not produced so abundantly is because 
"fool laws" still prohibit their profitable 
production. 

An Under-Estimate. 

Mr. Job's estimate that there are an 
hundred firms who are raising game in 



THE GAME BREEDER 



71 



America is far too low. There are, prob- 
ably, ten thousand game breeders or 
more, not counting hundreds of clubs, 
which have from 25 to 250 members 
each, which produce game for sport and 
for food. The Clove Valley Club, for 
example, breeds thousands of mallards 
and black ducks and the ducks not eaten 
by the members of the club are sold to 
a New York hotel and appear regularly 
on the bill of fare as Clove Valley wild 
ducks, during the open season. 

The Game Breeders Association, a 
Long Island, N. Y., sporting club, with 
$30 per year annual dues, produced one 
season several tons of game. All of this 
industry was criminal a few years ago — ■ 
made so by the activities of those who 
wish to make the District of Columbia a 
food-prohibition area. 

Oysters, Fish and Game. 

Mr. R. B. Lawrence stated at the hear- 
ing that once a distinguishing feature 
of every butcher store in New York 
City was the festoons of wild pigeons. 
Not claiming that the extinction of the 
pigeons was entirely due to market gun- 
ners, Mr. Lawrence said they were abso- 
lutely extinct. 

The fact is significant that during the 
period when the American wild pigeons 
became extinct the English wild pigeons 
became so abundant as to be regarded' 
as pests in some parts of England and 
everywhere they remain a common and 
cheap food. While we have been ex- 
pending enough money on game laws to 
feed the world with cheap game, if it 
could have been properly applied, our 
game of the ulpands. the grouse, quail, 
woodcock and certain species of ducks 
have steadily and rapidly decreased in 
numbers, although the markets have been 
closed to them for many years, and some 
States, besides the District of Columbia, 
have prohibited the shooting of the best 
game birds at all times. 

_A few years ago the sign, "Oysters, 
Fish and Game for sale," was a familiar 
sign in every town and city. The oysters 
and fish still appear on the signs, but the 
word game has been eliminated in many 
States. It is significant that the game 



has had the benefit (?) of thousands of 
game laws. It is true at one time that 
the oysters appeared to be in danger of 
extinction and there was considerable 
alarm in Baltimore about the oyster in- 
dustry. The records of what happened 
show that laws were not hastily enacted 
prohibiting the sale of oysters. Efforts 
.were made to encourage the production 
of oysters. Oyster beds were leased and 
common sense was applied to the pro- 
duction of oysters. A price was put on 
the head of the oyster (if an oyster 
may be said to have a head), but no in- 
telligent person agrees with the Zoo su- 
perintendent when he says "it is really 
marking the death warrant of any par- 
ticular species to allow a price to be put 
on its head." It is the price which causes 
an abundance of any species when the 
price is used for production. The trouble 
with the game in America is that people 
have been forbidden to get the -price of 
the industry which is absolutely neces- 
sary if game is to be used abundantly as 
food as it should be. 

If the opportunity to obtain the price 
should be removed from poultry such 
laws would soon exterminate poultry. 
The same is true of other food animals, 
and of horses, dogs and of everything 
else. 

Exciting Prejudice. 

Mr. Burnham, representing one of the 
game protective associations, thus ad- 
vised the committee : 

"We cou'd not follow the English principle 
here without upsetting what most Americans 
consider a system way ahead of the old con- 
tinental and European system where only the 
rich men have the privilege of shooting. We 
don't want that system in this country." 

We have a notion that the association 
which employs Mr. Burnham solicits and 
receives contributions from the preserve 
owners whom he denounces. As a mat- 
ter of fact these game food producers 
are performing a great public service ; 
they produce thousands of tons of game 
every year and, using an insignificant 
amount of the vast areas of land in 
America suitable for game, they not only 
provide food for themselves but for 
many others. 



72 



THE GAME BREEDER 



We can inform Mr. Burnham there 
are in America many thousands of men 
and women who are not rich and who 
are now engaged in producing game for 
profit on the farms which they own. 
There are thousands of good American 
sportsmen of small means who produce 
game at a small annual expense per gun 
—in some cases $15 per year. We deny 
Mr. Burnham's assertion that most 
Americans consider a system which sci- 
entists say must result in the extermina- 
tion of game if shooting be permitted, 
is "way ahead" of the system now used 
by American game farmers, men and 
women, which results in game becoming 
quickly abundant and profitable on pri- 
vate lands. All intelligent American 
sportsmen who understand the subject, 
all the game breeders, all the farmers, 
hotel men, dealers and the people who 
like to eat game and say it should not 
be a crime to profitably produce it, will 
agree with us that Mr. Burnham is 
wrong in his opinion — that the people 
are in favor of the legal criminal absurd- 
ities which appear in our game laws. 

We are surprised that Mr. Burnham 
does not know that the poorest classes 
in England are permitted and encour- 
aged to shoot the migratory fowl on all 
public waters and saltings and to sell 
the food they secure just as our oyster- 
men and fishermen sell the foods they 
secure. Thousands of market gunners 
or wild fowlers bring game to the Lon- 
don markets. Many game farmers in 
England make a living selling game and 
game egers. Their advertisements ap- 
pear in English magazines, just as the 
advertisements of similar people now ap- 
pear in The Game Breeder since we 
have ridden down Mr. Burnham's no- 
tion that it should be criminal to pro- 
duce and sell food. 

The English wild fowlers who sup- 
port their families in rural habitations 
by taking and selling food, would seem 
to have a better excuse for their exist- 
ence than those who claim to destrov 
only for fun. In England the true sports- 
man is very friendlv to the wild fowler 
and it has been said by English magazine 
editors there is more freedom in Eng- 
land than in "the land of the free." 



It is a well, known fact that the Eng- 
lish wild fowlers are not only permit- 
ted to shoot wild fowl on all public 
waters and saltings, with huge guns 
which often kill several hundred fowl 
at a single discharge, but also they are 
permitted to take the public fowl in great 
wire traps, called decoys, and to send 
the birds to the markets. These decoys 
are described in the book, "Our Wild 
Fowl and Waders," written by the editor 
of The Game Breeder and for sale by 
the Game Conservation Society. 

In the Shooting Times and Brirtish 
Sportsman there was an article not long 
ago about the formation of shooting syn- 
dicates or clubs in England formed to 
produce great quantities of partridges 
and other game, the members sharing the 
expense of the production. The editor 
remarked that before long he expected 
to see advertisements of shares in The 
Loamshire Shooting Syndicate and 
others offering shares representing good 
shooting for 5 pounds or some other 
small sum. This system already is popu- 
lar in America not only with sportsmen, 
who enjoy plenty of game to shoot and 
to eat, but also' with the farmers who 
enjoy having their taxes paid by those 
who wish to introduce and keep the game 
plentiful on the farms. 

Game on the Farm and Game Politics. 

Since most of the farms are posted 
against shooters and some States pro- 
hibit the shooting of quail at all seasons, 
all intelligent sportsmen now agree that 
it is desirable to deal fairly with the 
farmers and to produce game abund- 
antly on places where shooting now is 
prohibited. The U. S. Agricultural De- 
partment could and should do much to 
further such industrv. Unfortunately it 
has a bureau devoted largely to the game 
law industry and it seems to entertain 
the idea that possibly food production 
might be unpopular. We have a large 
acquaintance among sportsmen and all 
agree that it should not be a crime to 
produce any species of food on a farm. 
Can any one imagine a sportsman, out- 
side of those who seek to make a living 
from game politics, being opnosed to 
the production of game on the farms? 



THE GAME BREEDER 



73 



MY EXPERIENCE WITH PHEASANTS. 

Bv Thos. F. Chesebrough. 



A little more than three years ago I 
was looking one day over a magazine and 
noticed the advertisement of a well 
known game breeder regarding pheas- 
ants for sale. I have always been a 
pretty fair shot with a gun and have 
hunted partridges, quail, woodcock, 
snipe, ducks, rabbits, deer, etc., and even 
rattlesnakes in Florida ; but up to this 
time (three years ago), odd as it may 
seem, I had never seen a pheasant. 

I had no idea what one looked like but 
I made up my mind I would soon find 
out. So I read over the breeder's list of 
pheasants and I chose the golden because 
I liked the name. I purchased fifty eggs 
and not having bantams, had to set them 
under big clumsy hens. Thirty-six 
hatched and I was somewhat disap- 
pointed that I did not see the golden 
glitter as I had expected. Well to make 
a long story short, the hens with their 
big feet killed most of them and head 
lice did the rest. I was a novice at the 
game then but I DID SUCCEED in 
raising two beautiful cock birds, and I 
have them to this day. I call them my 
mascots and I would not part with them. 

I relate this, my first experience, in 
order to show I have been through the 
game and have learned my lesson; prac- 
tical experience is the best teacher. I 
have read books on pheasants but no two 
writers seem' to agree. Some say, for 
example, feed custard; some say, don't 
feed custard; give water; don't give 
water, and that is the way it went right 
along until I became disgusted and tossed 
the books aside. I made up my mind I 
would go to work in my own way and 
I did. I have been in the game for over 
three years and now I know pheasants 
from A to Z, or I think I do at any rate. 

I will now tell how I raise and take 
care of my pheasants. For setting I use 
bantams, buff cochins and Tapanese silk- 
ies. To get the best results and have 
strong chicks it is better to set the eggs 
in a nest on the grass sod, but I don't 
always do this myself. Great care should 



be taken that the hen is free from lice ; 
insect powder or spray solution will take 
care of that part of it. I also keep a 
sharp watch on the chicks from time to 
time, for if the wing or head lice get 
headway, it's generally good bye chick. 
I do not give the chicks anything to eat 
until they are twenty-four hours old and 
very little then. They get no water to 
drink until they are a month old, then 
I give it to them gradually for another 
two weeks ; after that they can drink all 
they want. I myself do not believe in 
cooked food such as custard, etc. The 
only cooked food they ever get from me 
is shredded wheat and sweet corn on the 
cob. They don't have anybody to cook 
for them- when they live in their natural 
way, and that's the way I try to make 
them live. I have a food I give them 
which is all my own composition, made 
of chick grain, mixed canary bird seed, 
powdered charcoal, shredded wheat and 
salt-water fine sand. I really believe the 
sand is the secret of my success. The 
sand is the grit for them and has just 
enough salt in it to keep them in good 
condition. I also give them green food, 
such as onion tops, lettuce, clover and 
chickweed. I give them more of this as 
they get older, also meal worms and the 
best food of all — grasshoppers. I give 
them the sweet corn (boiled) on the cob 
about once a week as this is very fat- 
tening and too much would do more harm 
than good. Ants are very good for them 
and I give them all I can catch or set 
the pens over ant beds. 

I use movable pens so they can always 
have fresh ground. I find the ringnecks 
and goldens the easiest to raise although 
the Amherst and Reeves are my favorites, 
especiallv the Reeves. I think the Reeves 
is a glorious game bird. I feed the adult 
birds in winter a mixture of ground corn, 
wheat, buckwheat, charcoal and ground 
ovster shells ; in summer I give the same, 
also green food, insects, etc. 

I make them hustle for most of their 
food in summer as I am careful not to 



74 



THE GAME BREEDER 



overfeed. Once in a while I give them 
the sweet corn I before mentioned, also 
apples, grapes and berries, in fact I al- 
ternate and try not to give them the 
same old thing all the time. 

I live right near Northport Bay, Long 
Island, N. Y., so that I am able to catch 
the horseshoe crab and I feed them the 
eggs from this crab. I know for a fact 
that chickens are very fond of these eggs 
and these help their laying. The food 
is very rich though and must be fed with 
judgment and not very often. I keep my 
adult pheasants in yards completely wired 
in. I have evergreen trees in these yards 
for shade. In the winter I put up corn- 
stalks all along the outside of the wire 
to break the cold winds, leaving the 
southern part exposed, also put a few 
stalks in the yards. This is the only 
shelter they have as I use no shade of 
any kind. Everyone knows what a se- 
vere winter we had ; I want to say right 
here that I did not lose a bird. They are 
exposed from overhead to all kinds of 
weather. They won't take refuge in the 
stalks but prefer to sit on the perches no 
matter how cold it is. My birds are 
surely acclimated to all weather condi- 



tions and I guess they can stand most 
anything. 

I do not pinion any of my birds with 
the exception of silvers as I give silvers 
full freedom like chickens. Ringnecks 
and Reeves are as a rule rather wild but 
mine are quite tame ; I have a Reeves 
cock that struts all around my feet feed- 
ing time and none of these birds are 
pinioned. I am also inclined to believe 
that they will breed better if they are 
not pinioned or have their wing feathers 
cut. Of course where one has a large 
number of ringnecks they would have to 
have too much ground to wire over the 
top, so consequently the birds would 
have to be pinioned or wing-clipped. 

In closing I will say that perhaps some 
breeders will not agree with me as to 
my methods of raising pheasants, but all 
I can say is that 1 have had very good 
luck and never lose a bird unless it be 
by accident of some kind, such as a hen 
stepping on them, etc. I have never lost 
a bird through sickness. Perhaps it is 
just luck after all. I do not want to go 
on record as saying I have better birds 
than anybody else, but I will say that I 
think I have as good and as strong, 
hardy birds .as anybody. 



FOOD FOR WILD DUCKS FOR FOOD AND FOR 

SPORT. 



By D. W. Huntington. 



Hundreds of thousands of wild ducks 
are now reared for sport and for food. 

The problem of feeding the ducks has 
been much discussed among members of 
The Game Conservation Society and in 
the columns of its bulletin? The Game 
Breeder. Mr. Dusette, of Bad Axe, 
Mich., lets his ducks fly and they find 
much of their food on the natural feeding 
grounds for wild fowl in the vicinity. 
He only lost a few ducks which were 
shot by gunners during the closed season. 
These losses stopped immediately when 
he offered a reward of twenty-five dollars 



for information leading to the conviction 
of the shooters. Mr. Dusette's ducks re- 
turn regularly to the game ranch with 
their young and during the shooting sea- 
son their wings are clipped and the birds 
are kept at home. 

Dr. Henry Heath, president of the 
Long Island Game Breeders Association, 
who also preserves wild ducks on his 
place at Orient, Long Island, lets his wild 
ducks breed in a small marsh back of 
his house where they find most of their 
food. A small canal or ditch, made bv 
dynamiting, makes the place especially 



THE GAME BREEDER 



75 



attractive to the ducks and they are called 
up every evening by a whistle and fed a 
very little corn. It is surprising how 
little grain is needed to hold the ducks 
and keep them in good condition. Some 
of these birds go South in the winter but 
many of them return. 

The editor of The Game Breeder 
made an experiment with black ducks 
on Long Island letting the old birds fly 
with their young which were reared 
about an artificial pond made by sinking 
a washtub to the level of the ground. 
The ducks spent much of their time on 
the bay a mile or two from the house 
but returned late every afternoon when 
they were fed with scraps from the table. 
Late in the summer they did some dam- 
age to the garden, eating cucumbers, wa- 
termellons, corn, and in fact sampling 
almost everything in the garden. They 
were permitted to do this in order to 
ascertain what they would eat. Almost 
any garden vegetables and melons planted 
roughly about a duck pond will furnish 
a lot of inexpensive food when the 
owner has the time to make such plant- 
ings for the ducks. 

Water cress, wild rice, wild celery, 
wapeto, pond weeds and other natural 
foods can be planted to advantage where 
the waters are suitable. The dealers in 
these plants are prepared to furnish 
plants and seed with instructions how to 
plant them. At the Game Breeders pre- 
serve on Long Island, N. Y., a few thou- 
sand wild ducks which were reared on 
the preserve ate all the water lilies in 
a good sized pond. 

Mr. Clyde Terrell, of Oshkosh, Wis., 
reported that his ducks which were per- 
mitted to fly about on the farm procured 
much food in a field of buckwheat espe- 
cially planted for them. They ate the 
newly sprouted plants and later the strain 
in addition to the natural foods above 
referred to. 

In the Western States many duck clubs 
have fed their wild ducks large quanti- 
ties of corn and wheat. When grain was 
cheap this was an easy way to hold a 
big lot of wild fowl on the club lakes and 
marshes. But at the present prices for 
grain it has been found necessary to pro- 



vide some other food for the ducks. 
There are complaints from Southern 
California about the wild ducks eating 
rice. The ducks should be shot and sold 
as food to offset the damage. 

Mr. W. B. Ager, the Oregon Food 
Administrator, said recently, "No wheat 
is to be used for duck feeding. Substi- 
tutes must be found and I am told that 
patriotic owners of duck lakes have dis- 
covered a remedy and have applied it. 
They are paying high prices for small 
potatoes which in former days would not 
have been dug at all. These they are 
mixing with other materials and the 
ducks are thriving on them." 

The wild ducks seem to be omniver- 
ous, or nearly so, and many waste prod- 
ucts of the garden can be utilized in 
feeding them. They have been observed 
in peach and other orchards, feeding on 
the fruit rotting on the ground. Where 
mast bearing trees are near the duck 
rearing grounds the ducks may be in- 
duced to feed in the woods. At the old 
Game Breeders Association preserve 
ducks ate acorns in the woods. All 
sportsman are aware that about the 
Western streams the wild fowl eat many 
acorns, beech nuts and other waste, be- 
sides the wild rice, wild celery, pond 
weeds, watercress and other natural 
foods. There are many places where 
it would pay to gather the acorns and 
other mast and feed them to the ducks. 

On game farms and preserves near 
the seashore many cheap foods for wild 
ducks are obtained. On a Cape Cod pre- 
serve the young duks are fed largely on 
the horseshoe crabs which are found 
abundant on the beach. Young and old 
ducks will eat fish eagerly and on a 
Connecticut preserve small worthless fish 
are netted, cut up and fed to the ducks. 
About the Long Island bays, and else- 
where, the fishermen take many fish 
which are not very marketable on ac- 
count of their size or the un desirability 
of the species. 1 have purchased fish 
at very small prices and have had many 
given to me as too worthless to sell. Al- 
though a fish diet does not add to the 
ouality of the flesh of the ducks, and in 
fact it often imoairs its value as food, 
there can be no objection to feeding fish, 



76 



THE GAME BREEDER 



as part of the daily ration, to ducks 
young and old during the closed season 
when wild ducks are not marketed and 
the diet can be changed to acorns, grain, 
vegetables, etc., a short time before the 
ducks are to be shot or marketed. The 
ducks as I have observed can be per- 
mitted to fly about and obtain natural 
foods. They may go a long distance but 
will return if properly handled. 

Since it is now well known that ducks 
permitted to fly about and obtain many 
natural foods can be trained to return 
home at a feeding time the best way to 
save in the food bill undoubtedly is to 
rear the birds unpinioned and to encour- 
age them to find their food in the 
marshes. Wild ducks respond quickly 
to a whistle or horn when it is used re- 
peatedly at feeding time to call them to 
their meals and they can be induced to 
visit a place where there is food by 
sounding the dinner call there, provided, 
of course, the place be within hearing of 
the ducks. 

On a New Jersey preserve, which has 
a canal running through it, the ducks 
were trained to fly to dinner, when a 
horn was sounded and the gamekeeper 
told me that the canal boatmen, observing 
the performance, procured a horn and 
called the ducks over to the canal where 
some were shot much to his annoyance. 

Since many thousands of wild ducks 
are now reared for food and for sport 
in places where there are comparatively 
few natural foods and since the feeding 
of grain at present must be almost or 
entirely abandoned, it is important for 
the wild duck breeders to learn that they 
can use small potatoes and other garden 
vegetables which are not marketable. 
Often there are a little more sweet corn, 
tomatoes, beets, cabbages, potatoes (in- 
cluding the small ones not worth gather- 
ing) and various other vegetables that 
are needed for the house and all of these 
can be fed to the wild ducks in order to 
reduce the cost of rearing-. Wild ducks of 
the common species, mallards and black 
ducks are excellent food and the birds 
always command good prices now that 
the laws have been amended so as to 
permit and encourage the industry of 



duck breeding. The license to breed wild 
ducks costs nothing in Massachusetts. 
In Indiana no license is required. New 
York charges $5.00 for a license to breed 
wild ducks and other game which is 
$5.00 too much since no food producing 
industry should be penalized to this ex- 
tent. In some States the license costs 
$25.00 per annum. In many States it is 
$2.00. 

The wild ducks sell readily for $3.00 
and $4.00 a pair for breeding purposes 
and bring nearly as much when shot and 
sold as food to the New York hotels and 
clubs. The eggs sell for $20 and $25 
per hundred and many thousands of eggs 
are sold since many new commercial 
breeders and sporting clubs always are 
ready to purchase both ducks and eggs. 

Wild ducks undoubtedly are the 
easiest game birds to rear. Often it is 
stated that pheasants are as easy to rear 
as poultry but gamekeepers and preserve 
owners know that this is not true for 
beginners at least; there is much to be 
learned about pheasant breeding before 
the breeder will be able to rear the young 
birds successfully. Wild ducks, how- 
ever, are very hardy and they are com- 
paratively free from diseases ; thousands 
of people with little experience have 
reared them successfully. The ducks are 
such big eaters that some have com- 
plained that the food bills were dispro- 
portionate to the profits but if wild ducks 
be introduced on any farm or country 
place where there is a little pond or other 
waters they quickly can be reared in 
large numbers and at small expense pro- 
vided they be permitted to fly about and 
find much of their food in marshes or 
besides streams or ponds. 

It is wise to clip one wing of the ducks 
at certain seasons. At the Game Breed- 
ers Association the ducks' wings were 
clipped just before the nesting season in 
order to comoel them to lay their eggs 
in a wire inclosure. This was made of 
5 foot poultry netting inclosing a little 
land about an artificial pond. If the 
ducks be permitted to fly about during 
the nesting season many nests will be 
made at a distance, often outside of the 
owners' premises and, of course, all of 



THE GAME BREEDER 



77 



the eggs cannot be found and gathered 
as they are when the ducks are confined. 
Some or all of the drakes may be per- 
mitted to fly about but they will spend 
most of their time on the pond or its 
shores in company with the ducks. 
Three or four ducks to each drake are 
claimed the proper proportion of sexes 
by most gamekeepers. The ducks will 
lay sixty or even more eggs if the eggs 
be gathered and hatched under barnyard 
hens or in incubators as they should be. 
It is a beautiful sight to see a good 



flock of wild ducks wheeling about in 
the air, the sun shining on the bright 
wing markings and on the brilliant green 
heads of the mallards. I observed many 
wild ducks last summer from a car 
window which were put on wing by the 
noise of the train and since they wheeled 
about and were returning to their pond 
before the train had passed, I knew 
they were hand-reared fowl attached to 
the place. The number of places which 
have wild ducks is increasing very ra- 
pidly in America. 



MY PHEASANTS. 

By Mrs. Martin Almy. 



I have read with much interest the 
articles on the hatching and rearing of 
pheasants. I purchased a setting of Chi- 
nese ringneck eggs last May and used 
a Plymouth Rock hen for hatching. She 
had chosen a corner in my brooder house 
for her nest so as I did not wish to dis- 
turb her I had my husband cut a large 
piece of sod and this I placed in brooder 
house. I hollowed out the sod in the 
center, putting in straw enough to pre- 
vent eggs from rolling out. 

I hatched nine chicks from twelve 
eggs. One the hen killed by kicking a 
piece of sod on it. I left the hen and 
chicks in the brooder house for three 
days during which time they ate very 
little. I then put the hen and chicks in 
an enclosed yard 22 feet by 30 feet. I 
put an old umbrella in the yard and that 
was all the shelter they have had all sum- 
mer. 

I fed them boiled eggs and boiled po- 
tatoes, both mashed very fine, with let- 
tuce or onions cut fine and mixed. This 
I fed for ten days. I then gave them 
whole hemp and canary seed, half and 
half, alternating this with cheese curd 
which I made quite dry. This was their 
staple food for two months. I then 



gave them the same as I fed my hens 
scratch feed with plenty of green food. 
They are especially fond of lettuce. I 
keep plenty of shells and fresh water be- 
fore them. 

I have had no trouble whatever in 
raising my birds, but as this is my first 
attempt I do not know what luck I 
might have with a larger number. I think 
they will prove profitable to me as sev- 
eral have declared their intention of pur- 
chasing eggs in the spring. 

My birds have cost me about 17 cents' 
apiece so far, for I had the milk for curd 
and had my own eggs with which to feed 
them. I expect to sell eggs and raise 
more pheasants next spring. 

I have made a shelter of cornstalks fas- 
tened securely to a stake driven in the 
ground and they use it whenever we 
have a severe wind or rainstorm. I do 
not know how it will work this winter 
but will keep the snow away from the 
openings and I am sure they will use 
it as they seem to feel more at home in 
it than in a building. 

I hope my experience will encourage 
some other reader of The Game 
Breeder to raise more pheasants. 



^^^^f^^ 



78 



THE GAME BREEDER 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



New Places. 

We were consulted about four or five 
new game preserves last week which have 
just started or are about to start. These, 
with the Experiment Station of the Game 
Conservation Society and the large pre- 
serve of the L. I. Game Breeders' Asso- 
ciation, indicate that the game breeding 
industry is keeping up well considering 
the times. The combined capacity of 
these new plants will be large. Hundreds 
of elk and deer, and many thousands of 
pheasants, quail, wild ducks and some 
grouse, wild turkeys, rabbits and hares 
will be produced annually and added to 
the nation's food supply. 



Importation of Live Quail. 

We have heard many excellent reports 
of shipments of live quail, including 
many from far away Mexico. There 
also have been some losses due to the 
overcrowded condition of express com- 
panies or carelessness. One shipper re- 
ported that the food sent for the quail 
in transit from Mexico was delivered by 
an express company as a separate ship- 
ment some days after the quail arrived in 
a Northern State for the most part dead, 
we believe. The losses may be made the 
excuse for advising the Biological Society 
that the importation of quail is all wrong. 
We hope that importations again will 
be permitted not later than September or 
October, and if they are not we shall 
want to know the reason. 



those who have eggs unsold should hatch 
them and advertise one-day old birds, of- 
fering to send with them the hen which 
hatched the young birds. 

We intended last year to make experi- 
ments with one-day old mallards and 
black ducks but the matter was delayed 
owing to the press of other business until 
it was too late and the breeders could 
not furnish the young ducks. We shall 
make experiments with one-day old 
ducks this year. 



Ducks and Incubators. 

Since there has been a great scarcity 
of hens for breeding purposes this year 
and the prices are high, breeders should 
try hatching duck eggs in incubators. 
Duck eggs undoubtedly can be hatched 
in incubators provided they have the 
proper moisture and we hope our readers 
who use incubators will report results 
to The Game Breeder. Remember al- 
ways that you like to read about what 
others are doing and that they will enjoy 
reading about your experiments, both the 
successes and the failures, if the cause 
of the failure is stated. 

There are many big commercial duck 
hatcheries where thousands of Pekin 
and other domesticated ducks are reared 
annually. The Game Conservation So- 
ciety will have many wild duck eggs 
hatched by these commercial breeders 
and the results of the experiments will 
be reported in The Game Breeder. 



Shipping One Day Old Pheasants and 

Ducks. 

We advise all breeders to try the sale 
of one-day old pheasants and ducks. 
Just before the war started the sale of 
one-day old pheasants had begun in Eng- 
land with good results. Broods of pheas- 
ants with a hen were shipped success- 
fully for considerable distances. An ex- 
periment made by the Game Conserva- 
tin Society last year proved that one-day 
old pheasants can be shipped safely and 



Bobwhites. 

The demand for quail far exceeded 
the supply as usual. All of the North- 
ern and Western birds offered quickly 
were sold at excellent prices. We heard 
of a Western breeder who had a good 
lot of bobwhite quail and at once sent 
an order for them but he reported, that 
they were all sold the day before our 
letter arrived. 

There is a growing and intelligent dis- 
position to regard quail bred and owned 
by game farmers as entirely distinct from 



THE GAME BREEDER 



79 



wild quail said to be owned by the State. 
In some States, Indiana, Massachusetts 
and others, quail breeding is a legal in- 
dustry and we have heard of sales by 
breeders without interference in States 
which have not yet repaired their game 
laws so as to make it no longer criminal 
to profitably produce any kind of food 
on a farm. 

The game officer who would attempt 
just now to break up a food producing 
industry would not help the political 
party to which he belongs much. It is 
gratifying to observe that the best State 
game officers are inclined to favor the 
food producers and to encourage them 
rather than to arrest them as criminals. 



Mexican Quail. 

The importers found great difficulty 
in getting all the quail tney wanted in 
Mexico. An absurd ruling of the au- 
thorities at Washington prevented the 
breeders from attempting to trap quail 
until the breeding season was nearly at 
hand and although the date was ad- 
vanced a little after we protested against 
the ruling it was too late to make the 
importations a great success. 

One of the larger importers reported 
to The Game Breeder tiiat there was a 
strike among the trappers who refused 
to work during Holy Week and imme- 
diately thereafter corn planting began 
and the trappers were engaged in this 
industry. 

There were some complaints about 
losses of birds in shipping. The express 
companies were not able to handle the 
birds as promptly as they should. 

It seems strange that the Government 
should persist in surrounding a food in- 
dustry with restrictions which are sure 
to work out badly, but this, of course, 
is one of the necessary incidents to game 
politics. We have pointed out often that 
the poultry business quickly would be 
killed in America if the game politicians 
applied their efforts to poultry. 

Quail should be imported at any time 
during the year when the importer deems 
it wise to make the shipments. The birds 



should not be held up in crates at the 
border until they become diseased or 
weakened so as to not stand the long 
journey. They should be shipped 
promptly to reputable game farmers who 
would quickly release them in large in- 
cisures and see that the losses be ob- 
viated. If the Government persists in its 
desire to have the bird looked over by 
"hoss-doctors," as one of our readers 
says, the inspection might be made on 
the game farm of the importer and be- 
fore any sales be made from such a place. 

Thousands of Hungarian partridges 
are imported annually to England (or 
were before the war started) without 
any nonsense being applied to the indus- 
try and the result was that the people 
during a long open season could buy 
cheap partridges in the markets. Game 
often was much cheaper than poultry or 
other meats and with the vast areas at 
our disposal in America we could have 
cheaper game for the people to eat than 
any country in the world provided some 
of the game officers who regulate impor- 
tations and other matters can acquire a 
little common sense. 

Sport has nothing to fear from game 
being made tremendously abundant on 
many game farms and very cheap in 
many markets. 



Profits in Eggs. 

It is true as Mr. Foote said in The 
Game Breeder for May that it is not as 
simple and easy to rear game as it is 
to rear poultry. For those who have 
learned the art of game keeping the 
1 earing of pheasants is not much more 
difficult than the rearing of poultry is and 
Mr. Foote will agree with us, no doubt, 
that the rearing of, certain species of 
wild ducks is about as simple and easy 
as the rearing of domesticated ducks is. 

The sale of eggs tends to make. game . 
breeding profitable for the beginner.:',;. 
Any- one can pick up eggs and. ihey aBetifi.1 
safely; shipped in ■numerous .excellent! ;;-j 
containers or egg boxes. PheasantS'-iwill-oac 
lay numerous eggs in comparatively small 
inclosures and all breeders admit that 



80 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the birds require less food than the ordi- 
nary barnyard hens do. 

Pheasant eggs are small and the ship- 
ping charges are light. These are paid 
by the shipper and it is a rule of the 
game breeding business that cash pay- 
ments for birds and eggs accompany the 
orders so that there are no losses due to 
bad accounts. Pheasant eggs sell read- 
ily at the beginning of the season at $3 
and $3.50 per dozen and at $20 and $25 
per hundred in large lots. Late eggs sell 
for $15 per hundred and we once heard 
but only once of a sale of eggs in Amer- 
ica as low as $10 per hundred. This 
was at the end of the season and only a 
few hundred eggs were sold at the price 
named. The eggs needed for hatching 
purposes had been more than supplied 
and the late eggs offered at $10 quickly 
were sold without an advertisement. 

In England, where game keeping is 
common and in fact quite universal, early 
pheasant eggs usually sell for two pounds 
or about ten dollars a hundred and there 
is a slight reduction as the season ad- 
vances. No doubt when game farms and 
preserves become numerous in America 
as they are in England we may expect 
a reduction in the price of eggs. But 
for several years we predict that pheas- 
ant eggs will sell at from $15 to> $25 per 
hundred and those who place their ad- 
vertisements early in The Game 
Breeder will get the best results. 

Just here we would remind our read- 
ers that too often they wait until May 
to send in their advertisements or until 
they are reminded that they shoud do 
so by seeing a big surplus of eggs after 
they have all they can set. It would be 
a good plan to put up a little notice 
in the hatching house or feedroom stat- 
ing that egg advertisements to get the 
best results should be sent to The Game 
Breeder in December 1 and January at the 
latest. 

Those who carry space advertisements 
or even a breeder's card by the year of 
course come first when the rush is on 
to buy eggs and the late advertisers can- 
not expect to get the good results ob- 
tained bv the provident who advertise 
early and keen the advertisement stand- 
ing through the breeding season. 



Wild ducks are easily handled and the 
eggs bring about the same prices asked 
for pheasant eggs. 

Remarkable Shipments of Quail. 

Quail shipped to the Long Island, N. 
Y., Game Breeders Association from 
Mexico and other distant points arrived 
alive without the loss of a single bird. 
A loss of ten or twenty per cent would 
not have been surprising, but to have 
large shipments of several dozen birds 
each come through without the loss of 
a single bird is gratifying as well as re- 
markable. 

One shipment of blue quail from a 
far Western State was headed for the 
preserve when the editor of The Game 
Breeder heard that the State Depart- 
ment had not issued the license to have 
them in possession which he had been 
informed was applied for and which he 
presumed was issued. The birds in- 
stantly were ordered shipped to North- 
port and the express agent was notified 
to deliver them to a licensed friend of 
the association the presumption being that 
he would gladly take care of the unex- 
pected guests when the situation was 
explained. The editor of The Game 
Breeder is such a stickler for obeying 
the laws no matter how rotten they may 
seem that he would not favor having 
birds overnight without a license even if 
the error be due to neglect. On the other 
hand when fool arrests are made of per- 
sons who are unaware that they cannot 
have birds even after thev have paid the 
fine or initiation until the clerk having 
the matter in charge decides to issue the 
license, the editor of The Game 
Breeder is glad to go to the assistance 
of such criminals and see if a jury will 
convict them and send them to jail for 
having birds in possession after they 
have paid the fine or license because a 
clerk has neglected to issue it. Why 
should there be any license charge or 
penalty applied to food producers? 
Massachusetts charges nothing for the 
right to produce game as food. 

♦ 

It is now time to be°"in advertising- 
pheasants, ducks and wild turkeys, quail, 
etc., for late summer and fall delivery. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



81 



Hen Shortage. 

From all over the country reports 
come indicating a difficulty of procuring 
hens for breeding purposes and there are 
complaints about high prices. The new 
Game Breeding Association, on Long 
Island, N. Y., like the other syndicate 
shoots, clubs and preserves, has experi- 
enced this difficulty. Duncan Dunn, su- , 
perintendent of the New Jersey State 
Game Farm, said it is a hard job to get 
hens this year. It keeps us on the road 
all the time after setting hens — 40 cents 
a pound for an old hen, some price, eh? 
And they are hard to get at that. The 
price of young pheasants and pheasants 
for fall delivery will be affected, no 
doubt, by the scarcity of hens. 

Use of Incubators. 

The incubator will be used more than 
ever this year and we hope many of our 
readers will keep records of their work 
with the incubator and send them to 
The Game Breeder. Remember always 
that you are interested in reading about 
what other members of the society are 
doing and that they will be much inter- 
ested in reading your experiences. 

The Long Island Game Breeders As- 
sociation and the experiment station of 
the Game Conservation Society will have 
many wild duck eggs hatched in incu- 
bators this season, including eggs of some 
of the more valuable species. The results 
of these experiments will be oublished 
in The Game Breeder and the reports 
undoubtedly will be favorable since 
many breeders now entertain the opinion 
that good strong wild ducks can be pro- 
duced by incubators. 

Licenses for Aviary Species. 

It seems to be generally conceded that 
no State licenses are required to breed 
the aviary species of pheasants. Intelli- 
gent State officers see that there is no 
necessity or reason for asking the 
breeder of aviary, or non-sporting pheas- 
ants to pay for a permit to have them in 
his possession or to sell them. The birds 
always have been sold to zoos and pri- 
vate owners of aviaries without buyer 



or seller paying any license fee. This 
is highly proper since there is no more 
sense in a State game department col- 
lecting license fees from the owners of 
non-game birds than there would be in 
the collection of fines from those who 
have canaries, poll-parrots or other sing- 
ers or squawkers. We are told that this 
matter has been passed on properly by 
at least one State commission. It seems 
peculiar that any commission should be 
called on to pass on such a question. The 
State department which would attempt 
to collect from the owners of aviary or 
non-game pheasants should with equal 
propriety call upon the owners of barn- 
yard hens for a tip. 

Abundance of Eggs. 

Many reports come from the game 
farms and preserves that the hens are 
laying finely. There will be a tremen- 
dous yield of pheasant and wild duck 
eggs this season. Certainly hundreds of 
thousands and probably millions of these 
eggs will be sold. 

Grouse and quail eggs are not so plen- 
tiful in the market as we would like to 
see them but this is due to the exter- 
minating effect of game laws in many 
States which often do not permit the 
owners of grouse or quail to sell their 
eggs. This is so silly that many owners 
are beginning to argue that it cannot be 
the law ; that the legislators cannot be 
presumed to be fools and that when laws 
are enacted protecting the rare and van- 
ishing State quail and their eggs they 
were not intended to apply to birds and 
eggs owned bv individuals. We have 
long believed the courts would so decide 
if any of the food producers be arrested 
and of course intelligent State officers 
do not wish to see any more arrests of 
people for selling egfgs or food which 
they own. The warden of the old stvle 
who delighted in making trouble has for 
the most part passed into "innocuous 
desuetude." 

GambeH's Quail. 

The Game Conservation Society will 
make an imoortant experiment with 
Gambell's quail this season. The birds 



82 



THE GAME BREEDER 



are handsome and very good to shoot 
and to eat and if they can be established 
in the Eastern States they will add a 
pleasing variety to the bag. The first 
shipment of these birds from the Far 
West came through safely without the 
loss of a single bird. 



The Long Island Game Breeders' 
Association. 

Although the Long Island Game 
Breeders' Association, one of the new 
shooting syndicates, made a late start it 
seems likely the members will have some 
very good shooting next fall. Here, as 
elsewhere, there has been difficulty in 
gathering enough hens for breeding pur- 
poses, but there are many ways of get- 
ting around this trouble. One-day old 
birds will be used. Wild duck eggs will 
be hatched in incubators and these added 
to the wild nesting game on the preserve 
and some hand-reared pheasants and 
ducks should make the shooting good in 
October. It will be interesting to report 
that shooting can be provided even when 
a late start is made. 

The membership in this new shoot is 
filling up rapidly and it seems certain 
there will be a waiting list before the 
shooting opens. 



Chicken Growing Scarce. 

J. H. McKeever, Aberdeen, S. D., 
says : The chicken shooting Was exr 
ceedingly scarce, the coveys being few 
and far between. Chickens are rapidly 
disappearing from the prairies of South 
Dakota as a game bird, and it is esti- 
mated that unless the law be invoked to 
protect them during a period of years, it 
will not be long before they are wholly 
exterminated. There was talk last year 
in this State, as well as in North Dakota, 
of placing a closed season on chickens 
for the next five years, but nothing has 
been done in that regard. 



nectady, however, and it is said that 
some of them have so preyed upon their 
imagination as to make themselves be- 
lieve that there really is game in Sche- 
nectady County, but there isn't. I have 
gone over the wilder parts and have 
talked with others who have "explored" 
the county and it is generally agreed that 
when it comes to real live game Sche- 
nectady County can't be included on the 
list. A few rabbits, partridge and pheas- 
ants are seen now and then and some- 
times an occasional fox is reported but 
they are never actually shot and brought 
in, just "seen." 



Good County to Start Game Breeding 
Associations. 

Has Many Sportsmen. 

However, as I have already said, Sche- 
nectady boasts of a large number of en- 
thusiastic sportsmen. These fellows have 
gotten together now and then and formed 
rifle clubs for target and trapshooting, 
but none of them has flourished and all 
have petered out except the Niskayuna 
Rifle Club, which has a range near the 
city of Schenectady. The Schenectady 
Fish and Game Protective Association is 
a sportsman's club formed of real sports- 
men who know the game. Their activi- 
ties have run along fishing to a large ex- 
tent in this county, while annually most 
of the members make a trip to the Adir- 
ondacks for deer hunting. 

There has never been any real objec- 
tion to trapshooting or the formation of 
rifle clubs, the only trouble • being that 
interest could not be kept up and the 
fellows began to lag in enthusiasm. A 
good organization could be started in the 
city, I believe, formed of trapshooting 
men, that would prove to be permanent 
if a real effort were made to get all the 
enthusiastic gunners together. — Reming- 
ton Live Nezus Notes. 



A Blue Report. 

Del Dunning, Union Star, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., says: Game conditions in 
Schenectady County are poor. There 
are many enthusiastic hunters in Sche- 



Good Work. 

It was reported last month that the 
N. Y. legislature had voted the able fish 
culturist, Mr. Titcomb, out of office. The 
Governor promptly vetoed the bill, and 
Mr. Titcomb remains. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



83 



A Poor Time. 

It seems to be a poor time for the game 
politicians to trifle with such an import- 
ant food supply as game and game fish, 
which are becoming plentiful under the 
influence of the more game movement 
advocated by The Game Breeder. 



Ornithological Fun at the Hearing. 

At the hearing on the bill to make the 
District of Columbia a game prohibition 
area there were as usual some humorous 
remarks. Mr. Wheeler, a member of the 
committee, observed : "Well, I would 
like to have a woodcock once more be- 
fore I die. They are the finest eating in 
the world." Mr. Graham, another mem- 
ber of the committee, describing a visit 
to the local market, said : 

"Red-heads were $1.75 a pair. That 
was when they were quite cheap. I paid 
$2.50 for a pair one day myself in order 
to see what they were like." 

Mr. Wheeler: "In order to what?" 

Mr. Graham : "In order to see what 
they were like." 

Mr. Wheeler: "You didn't eat 
them!"^ 

Mr. Graham : "Yes ; and they were 
not very good, because they had been 
brought in here from a distance." 

Mr. Reed: "Are cranes considered a 
food bird?" 

Mr. Graham : "Well some of them 
are. The sand bill crane is edible. It 
is quite a good bird." 

Mr. Mason : "All except the drum- 
stick." 

Mr. Graham: "Yes." (Laughter.) 



A Catechism. 



At the hearing the following: 

Mr. Wheeler — Let me ask you this 
question : What do you consider to be 
the chief object of these game laws? Are 
they only for the protection of sports- 
men or what are they for? 

Mr. Burnham — I think the chief ob- 
ject is to keep up the supply for shoot- 
ing. 

Mr. Wheeler— For shooting? 

Mr. Burn h Am — Yes ; just so the sup- 
ply will not be destroyed. 



Mr. Wheeler— Then it is to secure 
sport. 

Mr. Burnham — To keep breeding 
stock up ; yes. 

Mr. Mason — You do not mean en- 
tirely for sport, do you? What we call 
the sportsman doesn't shoot entirely for 
sport. He doesn't shoot a bird that is 
not eatable. 

Mr. Burnham — No, it is for sport 
and for food, and the general recreation, 
and also incidentally it benefits the far- 
mer, because these birds all have some 
agricultural value. 

Mr. Crosser — Of course, if you are 
looking at it from the standpoint of the 
agricultural value, you would not be 
thinking about shooting them at all 
would you? 

Mr. Burnham — Well, perhaps not. 
It is utilization to the greatest extent 
possible. 

Mr. Crosser — I am not quarreling 
with you. I just want to get your view- 
point from a rather fundamental stand- 
point, whether you had objection to the 
killing of game, or whether your purpose 
was to increase the supply of game. 



Some Answers That We Would Make. 
Paradoxical as it may seem, shooting 
may be made to cause a rapid increase 
of the game and cause an abundance on 
places where no game can be found to- 
day. Such shooting has a great eco- 
nomic importance. Darwin says if 
shooting were prohibited in England 
there would be fewer game animals than 
there are. The reason is that sport pro- 
perly conducted controls the natural ene- 
mies of the game and the sportsmen 
safely can shoot, eat and sell great quan- 
tities which would have been eaten by 
vermin had it not been controlled in the 
interest of sport and the food supply. 
Game birds are beneficial to agriculture 
because they eat insects. Shooting and 
the sale of game which cause game 
abundance for food should be encouraged 
and not prevented. Often when game 
properly is looked after the insects be- 
come so scarce that there are hardly 
enough to go round. Ant eggs are sold 
to supply the deficiency. 



84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



S. A. Tucker. 

A note from Parker Bros., makers of 
the celebrated Parker gun, informs us of 
the death of Mr. S. A. Tucker, who 
served the company continuously for 
forty-two years. The letter concludes : 
"In his death we lose a trusted and faith- 
ful employee and his death is a great loss 
to us all." 

The Massachusetts Report. 

The Annual Report of the Massachu- 
setts Commissioners on Fisheries and 
Game, as usual, is an excellent public 
document filled with valuable informa- 
tion. One of the best suggestions is 
"the possibility of establishing State 
owned reservations for hunting. We 
have long entertained the opinion that the 
State never would be able successfully 
to sell the right to shoot up the farms for 
one dollar a year, and that the result of 
shooting game on private farms where 
no attempt was made to look after the 
birds properly and to protect them from 
their natural enemies, to feed them in 
winter, to plant covers and preserve suit- 
able nesting places. The vermin and 
other natural checks to the increase of 
the game are sufficient to reduce it every 
year to a point where scarcely enough 
stock birds are left for breeding pun- 
poses in order to prevent a continued di- 
minution of the supply. When sports- 
men are permitted to shoot the stock 
birds left after vermin has freely dined 
it is evident the game must become ex- 
tinct, as it has on vast areas throughout 
the country. 

The place for public shooting is on the 
public bays and marshes and on the un- 
cultivated and waste uplands, but as the 
vast breeding grounds in Canada are 
drained the wild fowl must decrease in 
numbers, no matter how many game laws 
be enacted, provided shooting be per- 
mitted, unless some game breeding be 
done. It is highly important, therefore, 
that some of the marshes where wild 
clucks are bred be preserved both as pub- 
lic reservations and as private breeding 
grounds where the production of ducks 
will be carried on because it pays to do 
so. 

The mountain and waste lands also 



will not stand much shooting unless a 
part of the area be set aside for breed- 
ing purposes, and there can be no doubt 
that noisy refuges where game is pro- 
duced for sport or for profit will produce 
far more game, when properly handled, 
than any quiet refuge where game is, not 
properly looked after will. The game 
which will go out from preserves where 
the shooting is lively will be far more 
abundant than the game which will over- 
flow from a quiet refuge where most of 
it is eaten by vermin. 

There is much valuable matter in the 
Massachusetts report, and we hope to 
publish some of it later. 



Birds Versus Cats. 

(A good poster issued by the Massa- 
chusetts Game Commission. — Editor.) 

The nesting season of the birds has 
arrived. Whether or not there will be 
the desired increase in birds this season 
depends very largely on the protection 
which will be received by the adult birds 
during the hatching period, and the 
young birds until they can fly and have 
learned to shift for themselves. 

One of the greatest menaces to the 
bird life of the country today is the 
house cat. There are very few cats 
which, if given the opportunity, will not 
kill a mother bird on the nest or a help- 
less fledgling fluttering around on the 
ground. The great tragedy is as likely 
to occur in the clematis along the porch, 
or in the flower garden, as it is in the 
remote places frequented by the so-called 
"wild" hunting house cat. 

This is no attempt to indict the cat. 
We have great sympathy for and appre- 
ciation of the affection between Tabby 
and her owner. We are simply asking 
that at this crucial period the birds be 
given all benefit of the doubt. 

We earnestly ask the owner of every 
house cat during the next three months 
to assume the responsibility of seeing 
that the cat will not be given an oppor- 
tunity to kill birds. 

The country is at war. To win the 
war we must have food. It is common 
knowledge that the birds are a tremen- 
dous factor in the protection of the food 



THE GAME BREEDER 



85 



supply from, insects. Cats, if unre- 
strained, especially at this season, will 
tremendously weaken that protection. 
The logic is simple. The birds are try- 
ing to do their bit. Let us all help them. 
Commissioners on Fisheries and Game. 
May 15, 1918. 



Practical Results 

The Hercules Powder Company well 
may feel proud of the practical results 
which largely are due to its splendid ad- 
vertising campaign urging game farming 
in America. We do not know who wrote 
the following lines quoted from the ad- 
vertising of the powder company, but the 
writer should be given full credit for 
performing a great public service. 

Our readers will please take their hats 
off to the writer when reading the fol- 
lowing: 

Whether or not you are in a position 
actually to raise game, you are bound to profit 
by this movement. Although the primary 
benefits _ to be derived from an increased 
production of game will accrue to those who 
have the land on which to produce it and 
the sportsmen who shoot it, there is prac- 
tically no class in the country that will not 
be benefited by a large increase in the avail- 
able food supply. 

The game crop of Europe is a very valu- 
able asset to the countries that raise it. In 
a report on pheasants made in 1913 by the 
Commissioners of Fisheries and Game of 
Massachusetts, we find the following: 

"The pheasant crop of England is an ex- 
ceedingly important one, not onlv for the 
money derived from the sale of birds both 
at home and abroad, but particularly in con- 
trolling the gypsy and brown tailed moths, 
army worms and other pests which have de- 
vastated large areas where the bird popula- 
tion was abnormally deficient." 

To the farmer and the farmer's wife, game 
breeding offers a splendid opportunity for 
increased profits. The demand for eggs and 
breeding stock is so much greater than the 
supply, and will be for a long time to come, 
that no one who produces game birds has 
any difficulty in disposing of them. There 
are two ways in which farmers make the 
game crop pay ; through the sale of birds 
and eggs direct, and through renting the 
shooting privilege on their lands to groups 
of sportsmen. In the latter case, it is often 
advisable for a number of farmers with ad- 
jacent lands to combine for this purpose. The 
sportsmen's club pays a price agreed upon 
for each bird raised to maturity and liberated. 
In this way, good sport is provided and an 
appreciable addition is made to the farm 
income. 

Moreover, the rank and file of shooters 



who may not care to incur the slight expense 
necessary to obtain this class of shooting, will 
be greatly benefited because the more game 
that is produced the more shooting there 
will be for everybody. No idea could be more 
erroneous than one which shooters sometimes 
express to the effect that game farming limits 
the average man's opportunity for sport by 
creating rich men's preserves and encourag- 
ing farmers to post their lands. It is impos- 
sible to keep all the game raised on any pre- 
serve or posted area, and wherever they are 
located, shooting in surrounding territory is 
greatly improved. This applies wherever 
game is actually produced. The idea is some- 
what new in this country, and it may take 
time to educate the public to realize that if 
we grow one thousand birds on land that 
formerly produced only one hundred, we shall 
all share in the increased sport which will 
be provided. However, it is such a logical 
proposition that in most cases it only needs 

explaining. 

♦ 

Game or Vermin? 

In a recent issue of the state conserva- 
tion commission's magazine some inter- 
esting figures are presented regarding 
the damage done to small game by ma- 
rauding vermin. In a little over six 
months there were killed on a farm near 
Syracuse the following deadly enemies 
of game : Ten large wood owls, eighteen 
hawks, twenty-three skunks, ten weasels, 
eighteen cats, fifty-seven rats, nineteen 
crows and thirty-six water snakes. This 
is surprising in a farming section, with 
scanty wood land to provide cover for 
these marauders. On another farm, in a 
section well wooded, there were taken in 
only three months thirteen large owls, 
twenty weasels, twenty-six skunks, five 
cats, six large hawks, five hedgehogs, 
seventy-six barn rats, one mink and one 
red fox. 

Fancy the amount of pheasants, par- 
tridge, quail, woodcock, grouse and rab- 
bits required to feed these vermin. If 
the enemies of game are as abundant as 
these figures indicate, it is no wonder 
that, in spite of careful and intelligent 
conservation work, small game is becom- 
ing constantly more scarce. Every farm- 
er should set a few traps, at least. Pro- 
tection for his poultry should be incen- 
tive enough, and sportsmen everywhere 
should do what they can to assist the 
farmers in this work. 

[The above figures are mild. We recently 

(Continued on page 89.) 



86 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?5 Game Breeder 



on the lines of the Bureau of Fisheries, 
which is a highly creditable bureau. 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, JUNE, 1918. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



If the Congress heeds the requests of 
the game prohibitionists and passes mi- 
gratory laws granting the right to game 
law enthusiasts to make criminal laws 
which should be made by Congress if 
they are made at all and granting the 
prohibition of food in the District of Co- 
lumbia, which is common in all the capi- 
tals of the world, the game law industry, 
which is absurdly common in the States, 
will become a regular industry each win- 
ter at Washington. The country will ac- 
quire an immense lot of new criminal ab- 
surdities and the game as food will be 
come scarcer and scarcer. All scientists 
know why this must be so. 



The Congress would do well to enact 
no food prohibition or rsstrictive game 
laws at the present session but to appoint 
a committee to investigate the subject of 
game as an abundant food supply. Such 
a committee should hear the opinions of 
able naturalists as to the impossibility of 
increasing the food supply by enacting 
non-sale laws and the scientific certainty 
that the food can be made abundant and 
cheap in all markets provided the new in- 
dustry be encouraged and not prevented 

by laws. 

• ■ 

We believe if Congress will investigate 
the subject of game as an abundant food 
supply the result will be the creation of 
a National Bureau of Game, somewhat 



It will not be necessary to close the 
Washington market to migratory game 
and other kinds any more than it is nec- 
essary to close the other markets of the 
world to' migratory game and other kinds 
provided the subject of game as a food 
supply be handled with ordinary intelli- 
gence by legislators. 



CONGRESS SHOULD INVESTI- 
GATE. 

The Congress can provide a very in- 
teresting hearing provided it will order 
an investigation of the subject of game 
as a food supply. We can send some 
farmers to such a hearing who know how 
to breed and are breeding game abun- 
dantly. 

We think the committee should visit 
a number of the food producing plants 
and take the evidence on the ground. We 
do not know Mr. Wheeler, but we would 
like to see him appointed on a committee 
to take the evidence, and if the commit- 
tee will visit some of the places we will 
suggest we will see that Mr. Wheeler 
eats "a woodcock once more before he 
dies." 



We would like to have Mr. Johnson 
of Kentucky, serve on the proposed com- 
mittee to investigate and sample Amer- 
ican game before any action is taken pro 1 - 
hibiting the sale and eating of this desir- 
able food. We believe if Mr. Johnson 
will hear the evidence and sample the 
food he will agree with us that it should 
be legal to produce this food in safe 
woods where no birds occur to-day and 
that the producer should not be prevented 
from marketing his food under proper 
regulations. It is a mistake to say that 
we must continue to arrest the producer 
and prevent his getting stock birds and 
eggs until such time as he has made the 
birds plentiful and cheap. This is not 
the way to make any food abundant. The 
producer should be supplied with stock 
birds and eggs, and The Game Breeder 
will tell him quickly how he can have a 
good crop of ruffed grouse in his wood 



THE GAME BREEDER 



87 



and a big crop of prairie grouse in his 
fields. The last named are especially 
suitable for many parts of Kentucky. 
The Game Conservation Society will 
guarantee to restore this grouse to Ken- 
tucky and also to Ohio provided Con- 
gress will help a little and not hinder this 
food producing industry. We shall ask 
to have only two witnesses heard, one 
from each State, provided Congress will 
investigate. We would like to have the 
evidence taken on the ground in both 
cases but will promise that the witnesses 
will proceed to Washington if they be- 
invited. They are not common lobbyists 
such as too often gather vast sums to 
procure absurd legislation. 



The more we read the report of the 
Committee on the District of Columbia 
the more we become convinced that it 
would be advisable for the entire com- 
mittee to serve as a committee on inves- 
tigation of game as a quick and abundant 
food supply. We can have some excel- 
lent invitations sent to the committee, 
provided it will conduct such an investi- 
gation. All sides should be heard, espe- 
cially the farmers and sportsmen other 
than "game politicians." 

RUFFED GROUSE AND GAME 
ABUNDANCE. 

Mr. Graham reported that ruffed 
grouse were selling for $7.00 a pair in 
Washington. We will agree to send these 
birds in for about $2.00 per pair pro- 
vided the United States Government will 
furnish some stock birds and eggs just as 
the government furnishes trout and trout 
eggs to those who will produce fish. A 
bureau of game easily could produce a 
lot of quail and ruffed grouse in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and on some experi- 
mental farms near Washington and fur- 
nish stock birds and eggs to those who 
would produce the food. How long 
would it take to make the ruffed grouse 
very abundant in woods where there are 
none provided the price $7.00 per pair 
be made known? We can furnish the 
evidence showing how quickly grouse and 
other foods can be produced provided 
Congress is willing to hear the evidence. 



We would like to have an investigating 
committee hear the evidence on the 
ground where wild turkeys and other 
foods have been made abundant. We be- 
lieve if a committee will visit some of 
the producing plants and will sample the 
abundant food and listen to the evidence 
of capable scientific men as to how 
quickly all markets can be filled with 
game as food the result will be better 
than turning over the crime-making 
power of Congress to a committee ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of Agriculture 
with permission to make as many crim- 
inal regulations as can be imagined by 
those who have planned thousands of 
game laws. Such a law will produce a 
lot of crime. By no possibility can it 
produce food for the people at moderate 
prices. 



STANDARDIZING BAIT. 

The sheriff of York County, Maine, 
hit upon a happy thought and appears to 
have posed wisely when he planned to 
standardize the fisherman's bait in Maine. 
The World, N. Y., says: 

Any apprehension that the fishing season in 
Maine might prove a failure this year because 
of the war has now been happily dispelled by 
prompt official action. The Sheriff of York 
County decrees that an angler may lawfully 
possess two quarts of whiskey, and with that 
individual allowance of bait the season ought 
to be a highly successful one. The official 
ruling has become public through the testi- 
mony at a public trial. 

This generous provision for the fisherman 
evidences praiseworthy zeal on the part of 
Maine to conserve an important State indus- 
try. The Portland Eastern Argus thinks that 
"some fussy people might object that this is 
treating the State's Prohibitory Law like a 
scrap of paper." On the contrary, it is a con- 
firmation of ancient usages which were men- 
aced by modern legislation. It is a con- 
cession in a conflict of jurisdiction and as be- 
tween the old unwritten law and the statutory 
law. Fishing has immemorial rights which 
have broadened down from precedent to pre- 
cedent, and if they run counter to Prohibition 
acts, why, so much the worse for the latter. 

For a Legislature to attempt to proscribe 
fisherman's bait is ultra vires. The most it 
can do is to standardize the allowance, and the 
action taken by the Maine Sheriff to that end 
shows a wise discretion. Under this tolerant 
policy the quest of the trout and the salmon 
in the Maine lakes should flourish and pros- 
per, war or no war. 



88 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WELL SAID. 

Mr. John C. O'Conor made a sensible 
suggestion to the committee at the hear- 
ing on the bill to make Washington, D. C. 
"dry" in so far as game is concerned. 
Mr. O'Conor said: 

"Now when the State of New York 
adopted its constitution it provided that 
the laws of England, which were extant 
on the fourth of July, 1776, should be 
the laws of the State. We start then 
with the common laws of England, and if 
we had stopped with it, stuck to the com- 
mon law of England, there would have 
been plenty of game to-day. We de- 
parted from it, and we have no game." 
We went in for impossible game laws 
and lost our game. Scientists know why. 

The attempt to make game abundant 
by licensing trespassers to shoot up the 
farms' and by arresting farmers if they 
produced any game for food or for profit 
has not resulted in any game or even in 
any shooting in many States. Quail and 
grouse shooting are prohibited for terms 
of years or forever. Mr. O'Conor does 
not seem to be aware that in densely 
populated England 5,000 market gun- 
ners shoot migratory fowl on public 
waters and sell the birds in the markets. 



properly uphold the laws even when they 
appear to be wrong, deciding rightly that 
the proper remedy is with the legislature 
which made them, the courts not being 
empowered to make laws but only to in- 
terpret them and to decide matters aris- 
ing under them. 

It is a legal absurdity, as often we 
have pointed out, for the law to say the 
people may produce certain kinds of food 
pheasants and mallards, for example, but 
not quail and wood-duck. It is well 
known that the quail and the wood-duck 
are as good, and many say better, foods 
than the first-named birds, and since they 
are nearing extinction the quail and the 
wood-duck need the breeders' attention 
more than the pheasants and common 
ducks do. Common sense is progressing 
slowfy in America, but with the farmer's 
assistance we believe it will gain ground 
rapidly next winter in many legislative 
halls. 



LICENSES AND COMMON SENSE. 

We heard not long ago from a western 
game officer that numerous people in his 
state, who owned game birds prior to the 
enactment of a game breeders' law re- 
quiring breeders to have a license, had 
neglected or refused to pay for licenses. 
It seemed doubtful if it would be popu- 
lar to endeavor to make them pay for 
licenses since they owned their birds be- 
fore the law was enacted. We are told 
there are quite a number of breeders in 
New York State who have no licenses. 
It seems to be unreasonable to charge for 
permits to produce food just at this time, 
and Massachusetts seems to have settled 
the matter properly, making no charge 
for permits to produce any kind of game 
food on the farms. 

We have always advised people to 
obey the laws no matter what they are 
and to seek to have them changed when 
they appear to be outrageous. The courts 



GAME AS FOOD. 

Game of certain species rapidly is be- 
coming so abundant in America that the 
supply soon will exceed the demand pro- 
vided a lot of game be not eaten as food. 
The breeders should insist upon all of 
the markets being open to the sale of 
game. We can see that at the rate game 
now is being produced that it is highly 
important to encourage small shooting 
clubs as well as the big preserve owners 
to send a lot of the food to market. The 
sale of game makes it possible for sports- 
men of comparatively small means to 
have excellent shooting during long open 
seasons. The prohibition of the sale of 
game as food has a tendency to prevent 
the production of the food, and the ef- 
fect soon will be bad on the producers. 
It is good statesmanship just now to en- 
courage the production of food. The 
small politician who attempts to hinder 
the new industry should be highly un- 
popular. 



Muskrat is the favorite meat of the 
Winnebago Indian during the war. He 
declares it tastes much like venison and 
it is healthful food. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



89 



(Continued from page 85.) 
received a record of several hundred great 
horned owls being taken near a pheasant rear- 
ing field and many of the vermin records we 
have from our members make the foregoing 
look small. 

The use of traps undoubtedly is advisable, 
but care should be used not to take the game 
birds. We had quail for breakfast once be- 
cause a keeper set his to protect small pheas- 
ants on fence posts and by the quail for 
whistling stands. We once caught a young 
wild turkey in a trap set for ground vermin. 
A Vermont readers recently mentioned catch- 
ing a black duck but this happened to be a 
good thing, since the bird was not injured. 
During the coming year the control of vermin 
and the proper use of traps to protect game 
will occupy much space in The Game Breeder. 
A number of articles by experts will be writ- 
ten especially for the magazine. 



It is now time to send advertisements. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

The Game Breeder : 

Have you Gamble qvtail or any other 
quail for sale and your best price to us. 
I would like two pair any kind of quail, 
also want a buck deer. N. W. 

[This inquiry, like many other similar 
ones sent to The Game Breeder, can 
only be answered thus : "Write to the 
advertisers in The Game Breeder." The 
Game Conservation Society experiments 
with game, promotes shooting clubs and 
creates customers for its advertisers. Tt 
does not in any case compete with them. 
Neither the Society nor its publication 
deals in game. Sometimes! when a reader 
wants a special order filled which we 
know only a few persons can fill we may 
suggest a number of breeders for the 
applicant to write to. It evidently would 
be unfair for us to recommend one ad- 
vertiser against another, and we have 
had letters from readers (when we de- 
clined to do so) stating that they appre- 
ciated our refusal and admired the high 
standard the magazine had set for itself 
in all matters. We believe those who ad- 
vertise are reliable. We quickly take up 
any complaints, and we will not tolerate 
any unfair dealing. — Editor.] 



est might be created among the readers 
of our magazine by a discussion of all 
varieties of game birds, both native and 
foreign, and the ornamental aviary birds 
as well. 

No doubt the great majority of Amer- 
ican breeders are directly interested in 
ring-necked pheasants and mallard 
ducks, but as the natural tendency of 
human nature is to seek the rare and 
unusual, many would take up the more 
uncommon and expensive varieties, if 
they understood the opportunities for 
pleasure and profit. 

What are the best methods of preserv- 
ing as practised in European countries? 

What success have our breeders had in 
domesticating ornamental and game 
birds? 

Are South African antelope bred to 
any extent? 

Is it practicable to breed the lyre bird 
in captivity? 

Is anyone breeding the chacalacca, or 
Mexican pheasant, found in considerable 
numbers in Texas ? 

Are Western quail a success in the 
East? 

Let everyone "do his bit'' by a contri- 
bution of information. 

Yours respectfully, 
Texas. C. N. McElhaney. 



[We would like articles from any of our 
members who can answer the questions. Some 
can be answered by people in the office but 
not all without investigation and inquiry. 
Western quail have not been successfuly in- 
troduced in the Eastern States but some of 
our members are experimenting and will re- 
port. — Editor.] 



Editor, The Game Breeder : 

Replying to your editorial suggestion, 
I will venture to say that a greater inter- 



Easily First. 

Teacher was impressing upon the class 
the importance of accurate observation. 
To illustrate she said, "Now each of 
you look around this room and tell me 
what is the most interesting object to 
you and why." 

Tommy Jones was the first to raise his 
hand. 

"Yes, Thomas, what is the most inter- 
esting object you have observed?" 

"Your desk, please, Miss." 

"Whv?" 

"Billy Baker put a snake in it." 



90 



THE GAME BREEDER 




TEINCES 

FOR |GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
"RIOT" fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. H. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVILR LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE: CO., N. Y. 

Pheasant and Mallard Eggs for Spring delivery from 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



Pheasant Eggs from good strong 
ringnecks. 

$18.00 per hundred eggs 
$10.00 per fifty eggs 

WILLIAM RAY BALDWIN, 
ELK MILLS, - - MARYLAND 



Phone, 9286 Farragut 



FINE FURS 



JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bns, cavies. pigeons, etc Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

30c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 73c a Year, 3 Years $1.73 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS* NEWS 

1358 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



91 



PHEASANT AND MALLARD DUCK 

EGGS TOR SALE 



From Strong Hardy Birds, $25.00 per Hundred 
Also Day Old Pheasant Chicks 



TAMARACK FARMS 

Dousman, Wisconsin 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed. Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD | SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only snail parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



RAISE MALLARDS 

Eggs for Hatching — Manitoba Stock 

Setting $3.00 

Hundred 20.00 

Strong Flying Birds— Prompt Delivery 

HEMLOCKS GAME FARM 

P.O. Box No. 1011 Bridgeport, Conn. 



Yama Brook Trout 



Hi 

ft 



Scientifically bred by the Darwinian 
theory for vigor, quick growing to large size 
and to produce a large number of eggs — 
absolutely free of disease, frequently thriv- 
ing where others die. 

Information in reference to trout breed- 
ing and keeping cheerfully given by our 
trout culturist. 

Scientific examination made of your con- 
ditions for keeping trout at moderate charge. 

We have on hand for stocking 1,500,000 
Yama Trout from fry to 2 lbs. Eggs in 
seaaon. 

YAMA FARMS 
Napanoch, Ulster County, N. Y. 



WILD TURKEY EGGS 

$15.00 PER DOZEN UNTIL MAY 1st 
$12.00 PER DOZEN AFTER MAY 1st 

These eggs are from true Wild Turkeys. Orders filled in 
the order in which they are received. 

MARY C. WILKIE, Beaverdam, Virginia 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



92 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

Wf|TE FOR PRICES 



--P 



tU 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



UV-;V„- 



2r~s>»zmKm 



mm 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 



THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 



- -"<«« 



His Favorite Dish. 

(From the Buffalo News) 
"No wonder women go into politics," 
ventured Mistress Malloch; "men are 
such brutes and devoid of sentiment. 
The other night I asked Will, in my 
sweetest way, what his favorite dish 
was, and he said, The ash-tray.' ' 

His Error. 

"I thought you had given up burnt 
wood art, dearie." 

"Ferdinand, how can you be so heart- 
less? This is a pie." — Kansas City Jour- 
nal. 



Faith By Proxy. 

Many a man has an idea he is going 
to get into heaven by putting his re- 
ligion in his wife's name. — Philadelphia 
Record. 



Send us your advertisements of live 
birds and deer and you will be pleased 
with the letters from those who wish to 
buy them. 

In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



93 



DOGS 




iT^gD 'WtL».-,TUKi^£ 1 '»' 



WE are now booking 
orders for eggs for 
Spring delivery from 
the following varieties of 
pheasants : Silver, Golden, 
Ringneck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, Mongo- 
lian, Reeves, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Impeyan, 
Soemmering, Manchurian 
Eared, Melanotus, Blackthroated Golden, 
Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff 
Orpington and R. I. Red Fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan, and Fancy 
Ducks, and Doves of several varieties. 
Deer, Jack Rabbits. 



Send fifty cents in stamps for 
colortype catalogue. 



CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



HOUXDS— ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky, 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, lox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and raobit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge ihe quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, hiehly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2200 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 

TWO YOUNG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 

sale. Dog and Bitch. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York 3t 

SILVER BLACK FOXES. $10.00 PER MONTH. 

Men and women of small means desirous of becoming 
independent Silver Black Fox breeders, are invited to 
join the co-operative Setnmelroth Silver Fox Association, 
which organization supplies each member with a pair of 
highest grade Silver Black Foxes. Good Silver Black 
pelts sell for from $250.00 to $1,000. If you can sell ten or 
twenty of these skins each year and raise them yourself in 
comfort on your own ranch, you have something worth 
while. Write to M. B. SEMMELROTH, Box B-408, 
Coleraine, Minnesota. Particulars sent only on receipt of 
25c, returnable if dissatisfied. it 



FOR SALE-BREEDERS— SOEMMERINGS, MAN- 
churians, Swinhoes, Amhersts, Reeves, Mongolians. 
E. B. DRAKE, Ingram, Pa. 



Game Breeders Wanted. 

We will pay 20 cents each for a few 
copies of our September, 1917, issue. We 
have requests for this number for peo- 
ple who wish to secure complete files of 
The Game Breeder; for the Agricul- 
tural Department at Washington, which 
wishes to bind the volumes, and we hope 
readers who can supply this number will 
do so. It appears that anyone who has 
a complete file of The Game Breeder or 
a set of bound volumes has a valuable 
lot of books. We often are surprised at 
the requests for old numbers and for 
complete sets which we can not fill. Just 
now we are trying to get a copy for Mr. 
Clyde Terrell, one of our advertisers. 



MORE GAME 

AND 

FEWER GAME LAWS 



PHEASANTS and EGGS 

Good, Strong, Healthy Birds and Eggs 
NONE BETTER 

200 Pheasant Eggs at $25.00 per Hundred. 
30 Hen Pheasants at $3.00 Each. 
15 Cock Pheasants at $2.00 Each. 

TRAVERS D. CARMAN, 

c/o The Outlook Co., 381 4th Ave., N. Y. City 



FREE-"The Rabbit-A Source of Meat" 

illustrated treatise for 3c. stamp. Also my 
sale list of high class rabbits. Quality 
Flemish and Checkered Giants, Belgians, 
and New Zealand Reds. 

M. W. MEEK 
5141 Washington Boulevard, - CHICAGO, ILL. 



RABBITS WANTED 

Breeding Does and Young stock. All 
breeds. State lowest and full description 
first letter. Will buy Guinea Pigs. 

AUSTIN BABBITRY 
5136 W. Madison Street, Chicago, 111. 



1b writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



94 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

ISO Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE-GOLDEN PHEASANTS, TWO YEAR 
old stock. Eggs in season. A. M. SHERMAN, Marsh- 
field, Mass. it 

RINGNECKED PHEASANTS $5.50 PER PAIR. EGGS 

3.00 per 12. 1917 hatched Silkies. *2.00 each. Eggs, 

$2.00 per 12. GERHARDT PHEASANTRY, West 

Roxbury, Mass. it 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices : Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Witg Teal, 
$? 75 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, (or Drona. 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASAN I RY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT. Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 

Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — ONE PAIR GOLDEN PHEASANTS, 

$10.00. Two Golden H-ns, $5.00 each. Three Black 

Giant Bucks, 6 months old, #5.00 each. FRANKLIN J. 

PITTS, 14 Webster St., Taunton, Mass. it 

PHEASANTS— BREEDING STOCK AND EGGS FOR 

sale. Ringnecks, Mongolians, Silvers, Goldens. Lady 

Amhersts, Reeves, Prince of Wales. ROBINSON BROS., 

Aldershot, Ontario, Canada. 3t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT HENS, 1917 HATCH, $5.00 
each. Matured Silvers and Crosses, $12.00 per pair. 
Crosses are Golden and Lady Amherst. 1917 hatched 
crosses, $4.00 each. F. A. W. SHAW, 565 West 192nJ St., 
N. Y. C. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans. Wild Duoks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

BELGIAN HARES AND FLEMISH GIANTS FOR 

sale. Al stock. C. W. DIXON, 8612 Morgan Street. 

Chicago, 111. It 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS— WILD MALLARDS, 
WILD GEESE AND GAME. FOURTEEN VARIE- 
TIES OF STANDARD POULTRY, INCLUDING 
TURKEYS. ALSO ELK. LIST FREE. G.H.HARRIS, 
TAYLORVILLE, ILL. 4 t 



LIVE GAME "WANTED 



WANTED —WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Srtinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



GAME EGGS 

FOR SALE— PHEASANT EGGS FROM STRONG 
Healthy Stock. $3.00 a Dozen. LURAY ORCHARD 
COMPANY, Luray, Virginia. 2t 

FOR SALE-ENGLISH PHEASANT EGGS $15 PER 
hundred. J. CONLON, East Islip, L. I. 

FOR SALE — RELIABLE UNRELATED FERTILE 

Ringneck Pheasant eges. May, $22.00, June, $20.00 per 

hundred. JOHN BUTLER, Eastern Game Farm, 

Danielson, Conn. Route 1. it 

SILVER, GOLDEN, RINGNECK PHEASANTS. 

Mallards. Prices reasonable. FRANK MINZEY, 

Lake George, New York. 2t 

PHEASANT EGGS, TWO-FIFTY PER THIRTEEN. 
ELLERMAN, Yankton, S. D. 4t 

FOR SALE-ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS 
eggs from unrelated stock. B rds kept in their wild 
state with unlimited range. Cultivated under the most 
healthful and normal conditions. Also pure wild mallard 
ducks' eges from flight birds. TURTLE LAKE GAME 
FARM, Hillman, Michigan. it 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS — Many for sale by 

dozen or hundred. Ready now. Guarantee arrive O.K. 

MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Box 70 

Kansas. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. 

Chinese Ri gneck pheasant eggs, $.150 per doren 

Golden pheasant eggs 50c each. Mrs. EDGAR TILTON, 

Suffern New York. 4t 

FOR SALE— GOLDEN, SILVER AND RINGNECK 
pheasant eggs. Dr. JOHN M. SATTLER, Bear Creek, 

Wisconsin. 2t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 

CHINESE, GOLDEN, MONGOLIAN, REEVES, AM- 
herst. Silver Pheasant eggs from healthy, unrelated 
stock. Shipped the same day they are gathered. New 
Zealand Rabbits, Ringneck Doves, Pigeons, Japanese 
Silky and Buff Cochin Bantam eggs in any quantity 
Three thousand full wing Chinese for fall delivery. 
MARMOT PHEASANTRY, Marmot, Oregon it 

CHINESE PHEASANT EGGS J3.00 PER DOZEN. 
Mrs. G. H. ROBBINS, Hood River, Oregon. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Girae." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



95 



FOODS 



TO BREED MAGGOTS FOR YOUR YOUNG GAME 
Birds is disgusting because you must dabble in filth. 
Meal worms are the cnoicest insect food obtainable in 
quantity and are perfectly clean, too. They are no trouble 
to keep, since they live in their food, which is bran. If 
you never fed meal worms let me know when you send me 
your first order and I will give you the pointers you should 
know. 500 at $1.00 ; 1,000 at $1.50; 5,000 or more, in one 
shipment at $1.00 oer 1,000. All express prepaid. C. B. 
KERN, 10 East Main Street, Mount Joy, Penna. it 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery. Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck tcods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to d> it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORN'S 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lo*s. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges W. R 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina 



BOOKS 



■D/~\/"\t^" O Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

Ov/WlvO Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER — POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 

gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionport, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and c raining shooting 
dugs, anu trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

GAMEKEEPER— SITUATION WANTED 

American game breeder with a 15 year experience wishes 
to raise 5000 ringnecks for a private party or State, and 
having an incubator and brooder plant. Apply to THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

HEAD KEEPER SCOTCH, WISHES A POSITION 
Small family, four years' good reference from present 
employer, good reason for leaving. Experienced on 
pheasants, quail, wild turkey and mallards. Ten years' 
references in this country. Apply J. C. E., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 

POSITION WANTED ON A SHOOTING PRESERVE 
by a practical and reliable Manager, widely experienced 
here and abroad. Expert on rearing Pheasant, Quail, 
Partridge, Wild Turkeys and Wild Ducks, etc., the man- 
agement of Incubators, also a handler and trainer of 
field and high-class shooting dogs. A capable man to 
show sport, excellent trapper of vermin, a reliable and 
trustworthy all around manager. J. H. W., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, POSITION ON GAME PRESERVE, OR 
poultry farm, to finish my experiment-i in electrifying 
day old game and poultry, which stimulates their growth 
100 per cent : also to finish my apparatus, that will sex day 
old birds and will tell whether an egg is fertile or not ; if 
fertile, the sex of the bird when hatched out. I am a 
lecturer, demonstrator, and writer on poultry and 
game. 20 vears' experience in America and Europe. 
S. HERBERT, care of Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St.. 
New York. 



WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 

iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER.— SITUATION WANTED. — I can 
furnish (food English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper : can rear thousands of birds, and train 
dogs. &c. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to get a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address J. H., care of The Game Breeder. 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 

TRAVERS D CARMAN, c/o THE OUTLOOK, 3814th 
Ave., New York City, wishes to recommend his head 
gamekeeptr, who has had life experience on large and 
small estates in raising of pheasants, partridges, wild duck 
and quail. Understands handling and training of dogs for 
hunting and field trials, also care of fish, trapping and 
killing of vermin. Married, age 26, English. For full 
particulars, apply to W. BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, 
Danielson, Conn n 



MISCELLANEOUS 

200 PHEASANTS WANTED -WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age of birds 
R. A. MAXWELL, care of The Game Breeder, iro Nassau 
Street, New York. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS. $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink- of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2200 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. u 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED. EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH. ONAWa' 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Kox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
indusiry. Price 25c. postoaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York 

TWO LARGE MOUNTED MOOSE HEADS. 1 WO 
ten point Buck Heads. Pair White Swans in glass case. 
Owls, Hawks, Herons, Ducks, Gulls. Curlews, Binerns, 
Rare Birds. Minks. Weasels, eic. Write soon. Prices 
low. DETROIT BIRD STORE, Detroit, Michigan, it 

WANTED A DOZEN OR TWO OF COTTON TAILS. 

A. E. GODEFFROY, Godeffroy, P O., Orange Co , 

New York. 2t 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

We have Ringnecks and ten |-v 
other species of Pheasants, ^f^^ 
Eggs in season. One day 
old pheasant chicks 65 
cents each. Flemish Giants 
and other rabbits. 

THE MAPLE GROVE PHEASANTRY AND PET 

STOCK FARM, 43ldenAve., Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



BABY PHEASANTS 

Ringnecks and eggs, and 
one day old pheasants. 
Pearl and White Guineas. 
Eggs in season. 

THE HIRSCH POULTRY 

YARDS, 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 
Member of the Game Guild 





In writing 10 advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.** 



96 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from, membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



BREEDERS' CARDS 




LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 




BLUE 

Dave 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
nport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and FlemishHares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

mber of the Game Guild. 

GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $0.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation., Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



Me 





BOOK ON 

DOG DISEASES 
And How to Feed 

Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
Dog Medicines|ll8 West 31st Street, New York 




America's 
Pioneer 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 
Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 




DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 





SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas I 
ants and cranes, also white, Java an 
black shouldered Japanese Peafow . 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



WATER FOWL. 
I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 




GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 



Mallard-Pintail 



EGGS 



FOR SALE-1,000 PHEASANTS EGGS $15.00 PER 100. 
Alsn 200 Pheasants. GEO. BEAL, Levana Game Faim, 

Englishtown, N. J; 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gama 






Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
ind Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
he large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

AH Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and 
other water fowl. 






all 



Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very laree European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under oractically natural conditions. I have fiO acres 
ofland entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 
I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit soiicked. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia 

WM. J. MACKENSEN 

Department V. YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




(jg pLACK SHELLS 



AJAX 



FIELD 









LEADER 



IN ANY ONE OF 

14 SHELLS 

'• OO K at the top wads 
shown on this page. 
One of them bears the 
name of the maker of 
your favorite shell. On 
that same top wad 
appears the name of a 
Hercules Powder, either 
Infallible or "E.C." 
The next time you buy 
that shell, ask for 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 

INFALLIBLE "£.C" 

Hercules Smokeless Shotgun 
Powders, either Infallible or 
"E.C." are preferred by 
sportsmen because they can 
depend absolutely on the uni- 
form quality, even patterns, 
unusually high velocity, and 
very light recoil. 

When you buy your shotgun 
shells, look for the name In- 
fallible or "E.C." on the end 
of the box or on the top wad 
of each shell. If you don't 
see it, ask for it. 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

77 W. 11th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 




^ BLACK SHELLS 



^■■^ CLIMAX 

fe 24 \V« / 



12 



P£ I I TWk RECORI 



kfST^ 



13 



14 



Am 



T JNCH£STEl 

REPEATER 

3 ^ft ) 



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QAriE DBE 



VOL. XIII- 



JULY, 1918 



f'i r 



The Object of this Magazine is 

r to make: north ameeicathe 5k5gest 

[Game Producing Countby in the World 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field— The Migratory Bill— Animus of the New 
Congress— Details of Proposed Law— The Restored "Teeth"— 
The War Chest— The Toothsome Sections— Our Attitude— A 
Chance for the States and Territories— No Appropriation— Plac- 
ing Quail on Song Bird List a Mistake— The Maine Meeting. 



Breeding Black Bass 
Recollections of a Sportsman 
Intelligence and Prejudice 



Hon. J. W. Titcomb 

- Jasper B. White 

By the Editor 



Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves By Our Readers 

New Foster Mother— Why We Have No Quail-Daring 
Owls— One Day Old Wild Ducks— Black Duck— Mallard 
Hybrids -To Transplant Reindeer— Bob Acres— An Inter- 
esting Letter from Canada -Country Clubs in War-time. 

Editorials— Not the Rich Only— Why Not a Bureau of Game ? 
—A Few Things. 

Correspondence— Trade Notes, Etc. 



M- 



J&an 



._ _ PMIISMBD BY 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 50CIETY, Inc 

«| NEW YORK CITY U.&.A 







» 



I 



I 



There is NO TRUTH in the rumor that has 
got about — perhaps intentionally circulated — that 
we have discontinued to manufacture our well- 
known foods. 

In spite of great difficulties we have been able 
fill about 96% of all our orders. 

We have conformed to Government require- 
ments so that we and our customers have helped 
to conserve the supply of food for human beings 
by making and using a special food for domestic 
animals. 

If your dealer cannot supply you with 

SPRATT'S 

DOG, POULTRY 1 GAME FOODS 

Write us direct for prices 
and other information. 



1 SPRATT 'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, IN. J. 



PI 

PI 



H 



M 



SAN FRANCISCO, ST. LOUIS, CLEVELAND, MONTREAL. 









THE GAME BREEDER 



97 



I nnnmmn DU POUT AMERICAN INDUSTRIES ™ : am , a 




Rayntite Fabrikoid— The Tip-Top Top 

Thousands of cars look old and seedy because of dingy, 
faded, leaky tops. If your car is in this class why not have 
your local top maker restore its snappy appearance and give 

it enduring serviceability by putting 
on a new, beautiful top made of 
Rayntite Fabrikoid. 



Mark X before subject that interests you 
and Mail This Coupon to 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

Advertising Division 
Wilmington G. B. Delaware 





Motor Fabrikoid 


Craftsman Fabrikoid 




Rayntite Top Material 




Truck Special Fabrikoid 


Marine Special (U. S. Stand) 


Book Finish Fabrikoid 


* 


Town and Country Paint 


Sanitary Flat Finish 


Industrial and Farm Explosives 


Py-ra-lin Toilet Goods 


Challenge Cleanable Collars 


Commercial Chemicals 


Pontoklene Tar Remover 



Name. ■ ■ 
Address 

City 

State . . . 



Visit the Du Pont Products Store 
1105 Boardwalk, Atlantic City, N. J. 



RayntiTL 

A Da Pont Product 

is made to stand heat, cold, rain and 
snow without losing its fresh appear- 
ance. We specifically guarantee it 
for one year not to leak, crack nor 
peel — but it's made to last the life 
of the car. Why not end your top 
troubles once and for all with a top 
backed by a Du Pont guarantee. 
Check Rayntite in the coupon. Send 
for free sample and tell us the best 
top maker in your locality. 

Du Pont Fabrikoid Company 

World's Largest Manufacturers of Leather Substitutes 
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 

Works at Newburg, N. Y., and Fairfield, Conn. 
Canadian Office and Factory, New Toronto, Ont. 



^^^^^^^mam|| ^Mf)MiniEainm 






-.-J 



98 



THE GAME BREEDER 







.22 Caliber Rifles 

FIRST get the right rirle and ammunition 
— then snoot right, says tne old sports- 
man. He loves snooting, will not tolerate 
spotting around at tin cans, disdains "target 
snooting competitions that are not regular, 
and nis advice rings true. 



Region, 



UMC 

for Shooting Right 

Wnetner for snooting tne new Government sanctioned Small- 
J3ore Qualification Courses adopted by tne National Rifle 
Association for civilian and junior marksmen, or for bunting, 
Remington UMC .22 Caliber Rifles and Cartridges -will be found 
tbe right choice. 




THE GAME BREEDER 



99 




and Cartridges 



Remington UMC .22 Rifles are made in all styles, from single 
snot to autoloading repeater, there being nine different models. 
Every one of them is made to snoot right with Remington UMC 
.22 Cartridges — some models are the favorites for snooting to win 
the Marksman, Sharpshooter and Expert Rifleman TJ. S. Govern- 
ment decorations awarded hy the N. R. A. 

Get a Remington UMC Rifle and Cartridges 
and he sure you are right. 

Sola by Snorting Goods Dealers in Your Community 

Clean and oil your rifle with REM OIL, the combina- 
tion Powder Solvent, Lubricant and Rust Preventive 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION 
METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest TAanufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the ^World 



WOOL WORTH BUILDING 



NEW YORK 



mmmuM 




100 



THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR BUSINESS IS 

MAKING GUNS 




For over 50 years we have made big 
guns, little guns, good guns— The "OLD 
RELIABLE" Parker Guns. 

Send for Catalogue and 20 Bore Booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROTHERS meriden, conn., u. s. a. 

NEW YORK SALESROOMS, 32 WARREN STREET 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



THREE THOUSAND 



Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 



FALL DELIVERY 



Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game."" 



T h ! Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Office of Publication, New York, N. Y. t - Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Year 
VOLUME XIII JULY, 1918 NUMBER 4 

Co} 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



The Migratory Bird Bill. 

The latest reports from Washington 
indicate that the migratory bird bill 
passed the House of Representatives 
after it had been repaired; to put "more 
teeth in it," and that it had gone to a 
conference committee of the House and 
Senate. We are informed that the 
chances are that the. bill with all the vi- 
cious "teeth" in it will become a law. 

Since an army of game politicians will 
be created, necessarily selected from 
those who have escaped the draft, we 
have no doubt these politicians will be 
able to hold on to their law after they 
secure it since they can make glowing 
reports from time to time about the fines 
'collected from people who may be found 
to have birds or eggs in their possession 
or who have ventured to ship or sell 
birds or eggs which may appear to belong 
to the migratory species. Since wild 
game has become very scarce some State 
wardens, recently, have found it profit- 
able to raid the owners of pheasants and 
!to arrest people who trapped birds for 
breeding purposes or had eggs in their 
possession even when taken from irri- 
gated fields and other exposed situations. 
Under the new law the opportunity for 
national wardens to arrest game breeders 
will be even better than they are under 
many State laws. The opportunities for 
graft also will be splendid since the war- 
dens practically will be responsible to no 
one, a large committee being supposed to 
control them. The committee, appointed 
by the Secretary of Agriculture, will 
make numerous regulations having the 
effect of criminal laws. These will be 



known to very few persons since they 
will be published in bulletins and changed 
often. 

Animus of the New Congress. 

The new Congress of lawmakers ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of Agriculture 
has full power to create new crimes and 
the new national wardens are given the 
right to raid any one and search his 
premises without warrant, excepting only 
dwelling houses, which for some reason 
are excepted — a warrant is required to 
raid the dwelling houses of food pro- 
ducers. 

The animus of those appointed by the 
Secretary of Agriculture under the for- 
mer unconstitutional bill and who no 
doubt will hold over and make the new 
crimes under the new law, is important. 
One of them recently said to a Congres- 
sional committee : 

"We could not follow the English principles 
here without upsetting what most Americans 
consider a system way ahead of the old conti- 
nental and European system, where only the 
rich men have the privilege of shooting. We 
don't want that system in this country." 

When this individual (who evidently is ig- 
norant of the fact that many thousands of 
poor people in England shoot and trap migra- 
tory wild fowl and sell them in the markets 
as cheap food for the people) was a deputy 
State Game Warden he openly opposed the 
passage of the first bill offered in New York 
permitting the breeding of game for food. 

It was not possible to secure a law per- 
mitting food production without the danger 
of a fine or jail sentence until this individual 
and his associates retired to private life. Later, 
when it was proposed to permit the breeders 
in other states to send their food to the New 
York markets there was more opposition, and 
now we find the Congress turning over the 



102 



THE GAME BREEDER 



crime making power to people of this class. 
Another member of this committee we under- 
stand is opposed to the trapping of stock birds 
for breeding purposes. Why should A be 
permitted to kill 20 or 30 birds in a day for 
sport and B be denied a permit to take 20 or 
30 birds for breeding purposes when the re- 
sult of his activity will be the production oi 
thousands of food birds? In all civilized 
countries except the United States, the trap- 
ping of wild birds for breeding purposes is 
encouraged and the result is that the game 
birds always are abundant and cheap in the 
markets and the poorest classes are permitted 
to shoot and to trap the wild fowl on all pub- 
lic waters and saltings for the markets. 

Details of the Proposed Law. 

Sections one and two of the act pro- 
vide : 

Sec. 1. That unless and except as permitted 
by regulations made as hereinafter provided, 
hunting, taking, capturing, killing, attempting 
to take, capture or kill, possessing, offering 
for sale, selling, offering to purchase, pur- 
chasing, delivering for shipment, shipping, 
causing to be shipped, delivering for trans- 
portation, transporting or causing to be trans- 
ported by any means whatever, receiving for 
shipment or transportation, or exporting, at 
any time or in any manner, any migratory bird 
included in the terms of the convention be- 
tween the United States and Great Britain for 
the protection of migratory birds, or any part, 
nest, or egg thereof, is prohibited. 

Sec. 2. That, subject to the provisions, and 
in order to carry out the purposes of the con- 
vention, the Secretary of Agriculture is au- 
thorized and directed, from time to time, to 
determine when, to what extent, if at all, and 
by what means, having due regard to the zones 
of temperature and to the distribution, abund- 
ance, economic value, breeding habits, and 
times and lines of migratory flight of such 
birds, it is compatible with the terms of the 
convention to allow the hunting, taking, cap- 
ture, killing, possession, sale, purchase, ship- 
ment, transportation, and export of any of 
said birds, or parts, nests, or eggs thereof, and 
to adopt suitable regulations permitting and 
governing the same, in conformity with such 
determinations, which regulations shall become 
effective when approved by the President. 

The Restored "Teeth." 

When the provision permitting the 
new force of amateur game policemen 
to raid the people without warrant was 
removed from the bill in order to aid its 
passage, the only original wild lifer not 
in captivity at once lost interest in the 
legislation and it seemed likely it would 
fail since he produced most of the "stuff" 
or sinews of war needed to carry on an 



effective lobby, and in fact was the im- 
portant figure among the lobbyists, all of 
whom by the way appear to have been 
from New York City. The bill having 
been repaired to suit the chief of the 
lobby it soon became evident that ''full 
steam ahead" was the order of the day 
and the smaller lobbyists were delighted 
as they saw their chief rapidly putting 
the thing over. 

The War Chest. 

Those engaged in the lobby for the 
legal criminal absurdity had more annual 
revenues (cash or money in their pants) 
than is paid for salaries to all of the 
Governors of the States east of the Mis- 
sissippi. The last year's revenue of the 
few New York lobbyists who make an 
annual business of getting new game 
laws in all probability was larger than the 
annual revenues of the Governors of all 
of the States east and west and possibly 
of all of the United States Senators for 
good measure. There can be no doubt 
that the game law industry is booming. 
By continuous and active practice these 
lobbyists learn just how to handle the 
legislative assemblies and often it is sur- 
prising to us to see so large a number of 
statesmen as there is who refuse to be 
fooled by the lobby, read the nonsense 
offered, and vote right. Many, no doubt, 
are told that it is good politics to run 
with a lobby which has such vast rev- 
enues. 

We cannot give all the figures accur- 
ately since some of the protective socie- 
ties do not publish any statements. We 
have, however, accurate figures showing 
that the amount collected last year by 
the chief of the lobby and his smaller 
imitators is larger than the combined sal- 
aries of all of* the Governors of the 
States east of the Mississippi. We can 
furnish detailed .figures up to this amount. 
This money is gathered for the most part 
from benevolent old ladies, newly rich 
magnates and others who seem to be 
easily plucked. Since one of the lobby- 
ists had $5,000 of Andrew Carnegie's 
money in his pants it seemed to us to 
be in rather bad taste to denounce the 
benevolent Andrew at the Congressional 



THE GAME BREEDER 



103 



hearing for not giving ammunition to his 
friends when they came to shoot pheas- 
ants (?) on his grouse preserve and for 
not letting them have a single bird to take 
home to eat because Andrew wanted to 
make the pheasants (?) so cheap in the 
markets that it would not be worth while 
for any one to steal his birds. (See re- 
marks of one of the men who advised 
the Congress printed on another page.) 



birds or eggs in their possession pro- 
vied they procured them before the pass- 
age of the act. Any arrests of food 
producers reported to The Game Breeder 
will be given full publicity and we shall 
be glad to take a hand in defending the 
new criminals just as we have taken a 
hand in investigating and in some cases 
defending successfully food producers 
arrested by State wardens. 



The Toothsome Sections. 

Sec. 4. That persons appointed by the Sec- 
retary of Agriculture for the purpose of en- 
forcing the provisions of this Act shall, with 
respect thereto, have the same powers as are 
conferred by law on marshals with respect to 
executing the laws of the United States. Any 
such person shall have authority, without war- 
rant, to search any other than a dwelling, and, 
with warrant, to search any dwelling, if he 
shall have reason to suspect that there is con- 
cealed therein any migratory bird, or any part, 
nest, or egg thereof, which has been taken, 
or is possessed, contrary to the provisions of 
this Act or of any regulation made pursuant 
thereto. The several judges of the courts 
established under the laws of the United States 
and United States commissioners may, within 
their respective jurisdictions, upon propei 
oath or affirmation showing probable cause, 
issue warrants in such cases. All such migra- 
tory birds, or parts, nests, or eggs thereof, 
when found shall be seized and held and, upon 
conviction of the offender, shall be forfeited 
to the United States and disposed of as di- 
rected by the court. 

Sec 5. That any person, association, part- 
nership, or corporation who shall violate any 
of the provisions of said convention or of this 
Act, or shall violate or fail to comply with 
any regulation made pursuant to this Act. 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and 
upon conviction thereof shall be fined not 
more than $500, or be imprisoned not more 
than six months, or both. 

Many people throughout the United 
States now have and own migratory fowl 
and at proper seasons have the eggs of 
these birds in possession. If the new 
army of game policemen raid these peo- 
ple without warrant, as many food pro- 
ducers have been raided in the United 
States by State wardens, we would ad- 
vise them not meekly to hand over $15,- 
000 (the amount taken in one State raid) 
or any other amount, but to defend their 
property in the courts. We cannot be- 
lieve the United States courts will be 
inclined to send people to jail for having 



Our Attitude. 

We are not opposed to a proper na- 
tional or State law prohibiting the killing 
of wild migratory food birds during the 
nesting season. Such a law easily can 
be written and placed with other crim- 
inal laws in the statute books where 
those liable to arrest can ascertain what 
the law says. We are opposed to turning 
over the crime making power of the 
United States to a few money-making 
game law enthusiasts who are permitted 
to make new crimes often and to publish 
them in bulletins and who rely upon a 
special force which will do things which 
no self-respecting U. S. marshal would 
ever think of doing. Food producers 
should be as fairly treated as the rest of 
the people are. They should not be regu- 
lated by a force opposed to their industry. 

A Chance for the States and Terri- 
tories. 

The bill generously provides that noth- 
ing in it shall be construed to prevent 
the several States and 'Territories from 
making laws and regulations if they dis- 
cover anything left undone in the way 
of preventing "the hunting, taking, cap- 
turing, killing, attempting to take, cap- 
ture or kill, possessing, offering for sale, 
selling, offering to purchase, purchasing, 
delivering for shipment, shipping, caus- 
ing to be shipped, delivering for trans- 
portation, transporting or causing to be 
transported by any means whatever, re- 
ceiving for shipment," etc., etc., etc., not 
to tire the reader with the elaborate de- 
tailed restrictions. If the States can 
discover anything to be done after these 
national restrictions are elaborated into 
detailed regulations for the bulletins, to 



104 



THE GAME BREEDER 



be issued every once in a while when 
anyone thinks of a new criminal possi- 
bility, there may be some reason for 
keeping up the State departments after 
the grouse and the quail everywhere have 
been placed on the song bird list as these 
birds and the dove and the woodduck 
have been in man) States. Long Island 
will continue to be a free territory where 
■quail and grouse can be shot, had in 
possession, transported, taken home to 
eat, etc., etc., without fear of the police, 
and we believe it will not be long before 
some of the quail breeders send food to 
the markets, atrocious as and criminal as 
•such a performance may seem to the 
wild lifer and his small train of helpers. 
The more we read it the more we re- 
gard the migratory bill as a wonderful 
attempt at statute making, and to think 
that it was not even written by a law- 
yer! 

No Appropriation. 

As originally written the bill carried an 
appropriation for $170,000 to support 
the force. It was deemed wise, we are 
told, to ask for the money in some other 
enactment so as not to attract the atten- 
tion of the lawmakers to the fact that 
an ever increasing demand on the treasury 
was to be made to support the troops who 
will patrol the country and the game 
farms seeking criminals who would not 
be deemed to be criminals in any other 
country which has sensible laws. 

Placing Quail on Song Bird List a 
Mistake. 

[The following clipping fent by a reader 
evidently is from an Ohio Newspaper. — Editor] 

It looks as though someone has made 
a mistake in the attempted regulation of 
gunning. 

Reports from every part of Ohio show 
that the quail, which in many sections 
was quite numerous, is now almost en- 
tirely gone. The fact that these birds 
were put on the song bird list by laws 
passed in the last session of the Legis- 
lature has worked to a disadvantage and 
has defeated the very end which the laws 
sought to attain, according to men who 
have studied the situation. 

During the years past when Ohio had 
a quail law allowing an open season, 



there were sportsmen in almost every 
county who took it upon themselves to 
furnish food and gravel, which was scat- 
tered for the birds when there was snow 
and sleet on the ground. The men who 
looked after the birds that they might 
go out occasionally during the open sea- 
son were enemies of the market hunter 
and trapper, and in hunting they were • 
careful to leave the breeding stock suffi- 
cient for the next season. 

This is all changed now, it is said. 
Last year the quail was made a song bird 
by law. The winter just passed has 
been the most severe in many years and 
with weeks of snow and sleet, which 
prevented the birds from getting food. 
In many instances an effort was made 
to save the birds by feeding but it is 
estimated that fully 75 to 90 per cent of 
the birds were frozen to death. 

Hardly enough quail are now left to 
give us a breeding stock which has a 
chance of increasing in numbers. With- 
out the help of the men who in the past 
were giving the feed and protection which 
brought many birds through the winter 
seasons and kept the market hunters and 
pot-shooters out of the fields, the few 
birds are in grave danger of disappearing 
within a very short time. 

As a song bird the quail must take care 
of itself and it is the opinion of game 
wardens from every district that the 
birds would have f ared o better as game 
birds as they would then have had the 
help and protection of farmers and 
sportsmen to insure the conservation. 



The Maine Meeting. 

The twenty-second annual meeting of 
Maine sportsmen was held last week at 
Mountain View. There was a large at- 
tendance and an attractive program. 
Thursday cards and dancing at the ho- 
tel ; Friday morning rifle events in the 
rear of hotel, six matches ; afternoon, 
fly casting match, canoe races ; trap shoot 
at 5 p. m., all in full view from hotel ; 
evening, Billy Hill's exhibition of shoot- 
ing; business meeting; dancing and 
cards ; Saturday morning, five rifle 
matches ; afternoon, all unfinished 
events ; evening, presentation of prizes, 
dancing and cards. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



105 



BLACK BASS BREEDING. 

Hon. John W. Titcomb, 
Fish Culturist for New York. 



Nearly all species of fishes distributed 
by the Conservation Commission are sus- 
ceptible of propagation by artificial meth- 
ods and can be produced in numbers 
limited only by the funds available for 
fish culture operations. 

The eggs of both the large mouthed 
and small mouthed black basses and 
allied species cannot be artificially ma- 
nipulated, and for its supplies of such 
fishes the commission must depend upon 
the natural reproduction of brood fish 
held in ponds prepared for the purpose. 

The cultivation of these fishes therefore 
consists in providing ponds which shall 
give to the maximum number of breeding 
fish and their young all the essential con- 
ditions of a natural environment while 
at the same time protecting them (so far 
as possible) from their enemies. 

During the early stages of their exist- 
ence young bass in breeding ponds are 
exposed to dangers of many kinds, just 
as they are in the larger waters of their 
natural habitat. 

Snakes, frogs, turtles, various water 
insects, fish eating birds and mammals, 
all are destructive to the fry, while the 
young of the same school prey upon the 
weaker ones. 

The natural spawning period extends 
over six or eight weeks, and the earlier 
broods of fry prey upon their younger 
brethren. 

The losses from cannibalism among the 
little basses are undoubtedly greater in 
the confines of artificial breeding ponds 
than among the little basses hatched in 
larger waters. 

The degree of success attained in such 
work is also governed largely by the state 
of the weather and other natural condi- 
tions beyond the control of the commis- 
sion. 

Located, as they are, along the shoal 
margins of the ponds the nests receive 



the full effect of atmospheric changes. A 
sudden fall in temperature will often 
cause the parent fish to desert their nests, 
and as the eggs and fry are extremely 
sensitive they are frequently killed or 
their development injuriously retarded by 
the cold. 

Another unfavorable feature resulting 
from the location of the nests in shallow 
water is that it subjects them to the full 
force of surface drainage and washings, 
following heavy rains. 

Roily water is extremely injurious to 
the ova and young of the black bass, and 
as heavy rains and sudden temperature 
changes are conditions which must be ex- 
pected during the season of the year 
when these fishes spawn, the results of 
the commission's pond cultural operations 
are hazardous and uncertain in the ex- 
treme. 

One year a station may have a good 
output, and the next year, under apoar- 
ently similar conditions, very few \ ung 
fish are produced. 

Under most favorable seasonal condi- 
tions the commission undertakes to sup- 
ply to applicants only sufficient young 
bass for a brood stock, and in a bad sea- 
son like the one just past, it is impossible 
to supply even a brood stock to many 
applicants. 

A brood stock means from one to three 
cans of little bass from three-quarters to 
two inches in length, the number to a 
can varying from 250 to 1,000, it being 
impossible to carry more than one-fourth 
as many of the three-quarter inch bass 
as of the two inch fingerlings. 

The applicant, who has been accus- 
tomed to receive pike, perch or yellow 
perch in million lots, or some species of 
trout in lots of several thousands, is 
naturally disappointed. 

The only proper and economic solution 
of this situation is to afford the basses 



103 



THE GAME BREEDER 



proper protection while they are nesting. 

It is well known to anglers that the 
male bass, both large mouth and small 
mouth, protects the nest while the eggs 
are incubating and for a short period 
after the fry have hatched, after which 
time the young scatter to forage for 
themselves. 

While protecting its nest, the bass re- 
sents any intrusion, and will seize almost 
anything dropped on to the nest. He 
will take even an unbaited hook being 
dragged over it. 

The capture of these guardians of the 
eggs and very young fry is easy and re- 
quires no skill, but it is a conservative 
statement to say that for every adult bass 
removed from the nest there is a corre- 
sponding destruction of at least 500 eggs 
or fry — an amount equal to the average 
number of little bass supplied by the 
commission on each application for stock- 
ing purposes. 



In normal seasons the basses have fin- 
ished spawning in most New York waters 
on or about July 1. The last season was 
so late that the spawning season extended 
well past the middle of July. 

If the nesting bass are protected until 
July 1 it is believed that, in suitable 
waters for them, they will be able to 
maintain themselves by natural reproduc- 
tion to the limit of the natural food sup- 
ply. 

It must be borne in mind that the 
basses are naturally warm water fishes — 
the large mouthed especially so — but that 
they have been introduced into many cold 
waters better suited to some species of 
trout. 

In these colder waters the basses can- 
not be made to yield so> large a crop as 
in the warmer waters. One of several 
reasons for this is the fact that the colder 
water produces less food required by this 
species. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF A SPORTSMAN. 

By Jasper B. White. 



I have always claimed there was a 
certain congeniality existing among 
sportsmen that did not otherwise exist 
among men and, looking back over my 
nearly half century with rod and gun, I 
recall many delightful experiences that 
I feel sure will justify my assertion and 
if you can find space in your valuable 
journal, The Game Breeder, I will be 
glad from time to time to send you some 
of them as they return to my memory. 

It was ten years ago in November last- 
on the first day (it being our opening day 
at Currituck) when at sunrise with my 
new-made friend, T. J. Morrow, Holy- 
oke, Mass., we stepped into our boat 
and were off for the duck blinds. The 
weather was bright and beautiful, a real 
Indian summer day, but the ducks were 
abundant and in addition to the beds of 
wild celery, sago, pond weed and 



widgeon grass I had scattered plenty of 
white corn around the island to hold 
them where we wanted them. Mr. Mor- 
row (whom after that day I only knew 
as Tom) was a keen sportsman and de- 
lightful companion but he had never vis- 
ited Currituck before and when I told 
him to take out a case. (500 shells) he 
laughingly said you mean 50, but he 
finally agreed to take 100— I hid 300 
more under the oil skins, as he said it 
was bad luck to take so many shells. 
Did you ever in the middle of a splendid 
flight of ducks shoot away your last 
shell and have to go home? This has 
happened to me six times during the past 
season, 1917-1918. I always said after 
each experience it shall never, never hap- 
pen again. 

About twenty minutes in a motor boat 
with the decoy boat behind and we were 



THE GAME BREEDER 



107 



at Five Islands. The water was covered 
with ducks and the air filled with them 
While I was placing out the decoys Tom 
fired twenty shots, many of the ducks 
nearly falling on me. It being the first 
day they were young and tame, many of 
them had never heard a shot before. 

We often get thrills ; at different times 
in life and from many causes. But for 
a duck shooter such days as these fill 
one's cup to overflowing and enable us to 
drop every care. The day was perfect — 
the ducks fat and delicious and our bag 
was ninety-three canvasbacks, redheads 
and bluebills. 

We have shot together here every sea- 
son since then but one. But I will never 
forget a stormy morning last December, 
1917. We went to a sheltered island for 
it was quite cold, with a hard northwest 
wind (our first winter day) and it seemed 
to me I never saw so many ducks and 



geese. We took a case of shells, but alas 
— on opening them we found they were 
No. 8 shot instead of 4's as they should 
have been. We were three miles from 
home with ducks coming every five min- 
utes. 

At noon we had emptied 340 shells when 
Tom said let's quit, I have all the ducks 
I want for my own use and some for all 
my friends at home. This has been a 
wonderful ten days, Jasper ; I have had 
many a happy day in the blind with you, 
and we have made some splendid bags 
during the many years we have shot to- 
gether, but this tops them all. I will be 
with you again next Thanksgiving Day. 
And how very, very much I wish he 
could, for Tom was the "salt of the 
earth." My heart is sad now for I shall 
hunt no more with him unless there is 
duck shooting in the great beyond. He 
died ten days after our last hunt. 



THE HOUSE RAT. 

The Most Destructive Enemy in the World. 

By David E. Lantz, 
Assistant Biologist, Bureau of Biological Survey. 



A single rat does far less harm in a 
year than one of the larger mammals, 
such as a lion, tiger or wolf ; but the 
large mammals of prey are compara- 
tively few in number, while rats are ex- 
ceedingly abundant. North America or 
any other continent has probably as many 
rats as people — possibly two or three 
times as many. The destruction wrought 
by this vast horde of rodents is far 
greater than that wrought by lions, tigers, 
wolves and all other noxious mammals 
together. 

Injurious insects are enormously de- 
structive to crops. Probably their com- 
bined ravages inflict greater economic 
losses than do those of rats, but no one 
kind of insect destroys as much. The 
harm done by any species of insect is 
usually confined to certain geographic 
limits, rarely extending over large parts 
of a continent; that done by the rat ex- 



tends over the whole world. Oceans fail 
to limit its activities. 

The rat's destructiveness is not ■ con- 
fined to crops and property ; it menaces 
human life as well. This rodent is re- 
sponsible for more deaths among human 
beings than all the wars of history. Not 
all the fatal epidemics of the past were 
bubonic plague, but enough of them have 
been so identified to show that almost 
every century of the Christian era has 
had at least one great pandemic of this 
scourge which destroyed millions of the 
world's population. The great plague 
of London, which killed more than half 
the inhabitants that did not flee from 
the city, was by no means the worst out- 
break recorded. The plague called "black 
death" devastated Europe for fifty years 
of the fourteenth century, destroying two- 
thirds to three-fourths of the population 
of large territories and one-fourth of 



108 



THE GAME BREEDER 



all the people, or about 25,000,000 per- 
sons. Since 1896 plague has carried 
away nearly 9,000,000 of the population 
of India alone. The disease is still in- 
trenched in Asia, Africa, Australia and 
South America, and cases of it have oc- 
curred in Europe and North America. 

Through the fleas that infest them, rats 
are almost wholly responsible for the 
perpetuation and transmission of bubonic 
plague, and it has been proved also that 
rats are active, although not exclusive, 
agents in spreading pneumonic plague. 
Only the prompt measures taken by the 
United States Public Health Service 
against these animals prevented disas- 
trous epidemics of plague in San Fran- 
cisco, Seattle and Hawaii in 1909, in 
Porto Rico in 1912 and in New Orleans 
in 1914. 

The entire role of the rat in transmit- 
ting diseases to man is not fully under- 
stood. Septic pneumonia and epidemic 
jaundice in man have been traced to the 
rodent, and it is known to perpetuate 
trichinae in the pig. It is suspected of 
being a carrier of infantile paralysis, and 
it undoubtedly carries many kinds of 
infectious germs from its haunts of filth, 
leaving them upon human food. 

The economic loss due to rats is as- 
tounding. No extensive or exact statis- 
tics on the subject are available,* but 
surveys of conditions existing in a few 
of the older cities of the United States 
show that losses due to rats are almost in 
exact ratio to the populations. In rural 
districts the losses are much greater in 
proportion to inhabitants than in cities. 
Assuming that there are in the United 
States only as many rats as people, and 
that each rat in a year destroys prop- 
erty valued at $2, the total yearly damage 
is about $200,000,000. To this must be 
added the expense of fighting rats, in- 
cluding the large sums paid for traps and 
poisons, the keep of dogs and cats, and 
the labor involved. In addition, the loss 
of human efficiency due to diseases dis- 



seminated by the rat should be consid- 
ered. It is hardly thinkable that a civil- 
ized people should rest supinely under 
such conditions and let this evil continue, 
particularly when it is known that num- 
berless human lives are in jeopardy. 
Think of the waste involve in a loss of 
$200,000,000 a year ! The constant labor 
of an army of more than 200,000 men is 
required to produce the materials eaten 
and destroyed by rats. If half this loss 
were represented by grain destroyed, it 
would take about 5,000,000 acres to pro- 
duce it. 

Man has been fighting the rat for cen- 
turies and has made little progress. The 
rodents are intrenched in fortresses of 
man's own building. If they are driven 
out or overcome for a time, others soon 
swarm from neighboring premises, and 
the battle has to begin anew. Defeats 
have been due not so much to lack of 
proper methods as to neglect of precau- 
tions and an absence of concerted action. 
The work has been made abortive by 
providing continued subsistence for the 
rodents and by failing to destroy their 
intrenchments. When once they are de- 
prived of these advantages and the cam- 
paign against them is organized on lines 
of intelligent co-operation a large meas- 
ure of success will be achieved. 

Civilization and science have by no 
means spoken their last word about the 
means of combating this greatest plague 
of the human race. A building can be 
made rat-proof ; why not a farmstead, 
a street, a village, a city, or a. seaport? 
If rats cannot be exterminated, they at 
least can be repressed in this country, 
and at the same time effective barriers 
can be erected against the landing of 
fresh hordes. Up to the -present time, 
however, few efforts have been made to 
find out the way or even to apply pro- 
perly the means already at command. 
It is high time to begin. 

[Game keepers are effective in destroying- 
rats on the farms. — Editor.] 



^Estimates of annual rat damage in foreign 
countries made previous to the present war 
were: United Kingdom, $73,000,000; France, 
$38,500,000; Germany, $47,640,000;' Denmark, 
$3,000,000. 



Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, 
Where Kaisers rule and "culture" starts 
with "K." 



THE GAME BREEDER 109 



INTELLIGENCE AND PREJUDICE. 

By The Editor. 

A Southern lady, referring to Mr. plowed under with the stubble, leaving 
Burnham's statement that we don't want at certain seasons absolutely no cover 
the foreign system of game breeding in or food for game birds, cannot be kept 
this country, writes : 'About this idiotic well stocked with grouse or quail by 
prejudice against 'foreigners,' meaning enacting laws prohibiting the shooting 
nearly always the British, I hardly know of more than six birds in a day and pro- 
how to express my disgust. You see hibiting the sale and transportation of 
I hear it day in and day out. I recall the food. Even laws prohibiting shoot- 
one well informed man, or I thought he ing do not help matters in places where 
was so, who was present when I was the lands are used in the ways referred 
comparing this government with that of to. 

England and averred (and I think it is The licensing of gunners to shoot up 
true) that the last named was more of the farms is not a sufficient inducement 
a democracy than our government, and to cause, the ranchers and farmers to 
that the President had more authority by leave some cover and food at the sides 
or to the extent of his veto than the of the fields or to make the special plant- 
English King. The man objecting, when ings which are necessary in closely pas- 
pressed for a reason said that 'the King tured or cultivated regions to make the 
could cut his head off.' Such ignorance land habitable for game. The buffalo, 
is to be pitied, of course, instead of the elk and the antelope naturally disap- 
blamed. And there is in so many re- pear from cultivated regions. They 
spects the same prejudice when every would not be tolerated when found de- 
cultured man or woman who has traveled stroying the crops. 

and knows anything about the 'foreign j n England there are big places where 

system' knows it is practical. How many [ t [ s i ega l to have game as a food crop, 

methods scoffed at and objected to in the There are also small farms which have 

fullness of conceit and ignorance have an abundance of game because it is not 

been eagerly adopted since the war came criminal to sell the food ; and the still 

home to this country ? Everyone knows poorer classes are permitted to shoot and 

when any one wants a good gamekeeper trap t h e migratory fowl on all public 

he looks for a Scotchman or an English- wa ters and marshes just as fishermen and 

man. Why ? Because they know their ystermen are permitted to take and sell 

business." fish a nd oysters. We would advise Mr. 

In America it is perfectly legal to ere- Burnham to read a little book written 
ate a big cattle or sheep ranch or a vast by Captain (Dates, a retired British offi- 
wheat or hay farm and even to drain a cer, who decided to live in the country 
large area in order to intensively culti- and secured a small farm. He describes 
vate it. Such industry if no attention be how he quickly produced a lot of wild 
given to the game necessarily results in ducks enough for his own and his friends' 
the extermination of the game birds. The shooting and he says by marketing some 
wild ducks disappear from the drained of the ducks shot he about paid his ex- 
area, the grouse and the quail cannot penses. There is plenty of room in 
exist on vast pastures or grazing lands America for retired officers and many 
where their natural covers and foods are others of moderate means to have inter- 
extirpated. Big wheat farms where esting country homes and in places 
every wild rose and sunflower are where such people are not hounded by 



110 



THE GAME BREEDER 



game politicians they quickly should pro- 
vide food as well as sport for themselves 
and for their friends and many others. 
Some of the game will go to public 
waters and improve the shooting where 
the public should shoot, some will go to 
market as cheap food for the people. 
There are thousands of ponds in Amer- 
ica where not a single duck nests to-day 
and where if a duck put in an appear- 
ance the whole neighborhood would rise 
up in arms to kill it. In most places the 
season when the duck appeared would 
make little difference since a game cus- 
todian having several counties to look af- 
ter would hardly be expected to inter- 
fere. Certain it is that the utilization of 
many of these desolate ponds would im- 
prove the shooting for those who do noth- 
ing in the way of producing game. 

The larger places in England which 
have game are not as large as many of 
the places in America where it is legal 
to have cattle and sheep, wheat, hay and 
other crops, and where shooting would 
be prohibited if any game occurred. 

The game politician in America who 
thinks large forces of game wardens and 
large funds to keep up the American sys- 
tem are more important than an abun- 
dance of game for all of the people may 
fool some of the people some of the time 
but to maintain himself it seems neces- 
sary to say that it should be a crime to 
produce food on the farms. Even if the 
system depreciates farm values and in 
some cases prevents their sale, even if the 
tendency is to prevent many people from 
living in the country and results in put- 
ting our best food birds on the song 
bird list and in putting an end to shooting, 
our game politician still may be heard to 
say the system with its revenues must 
be maintained no matter what be the re- 
sults. We think the system can be modi- 
fied to advantage as it has been in Massa- 
chusetts and elsewhere. Intelligent sports- 
men, farmers and the people who can see 
no reason why food birds should not be 
a common food rapidly are beginning to 
differ with the old-style game politicians 
and when the issue is presented as it may 
be before long in some of the states we 
have a notion the people may decide that 



there should be as much freedom in the 
land of the free as there is in some other 
democratic countries. 

As a vote-getter we would prefer to 
have the southern lady above quoted on 
our side to having a half dozen game 
wardens who may have made a record 
raiding food producers. We know there 
is a lot of money invested in the game 
law business but we have seen more than 
one election turn out to be a great sur- 
prise for the side that had the most 
"stuff." Quite a decided interest in game 
farming rapidly has sprung up in the 
west and the idea that New York should 
not run the country is not a new one 
in several outlying districts. 

We shall not be surprised if the far- 
mers decide that it should not be a crime 
to produce food on the farms. There is 
a small army of women engaged in breed- 
ing game and they have many friends 
who think as they do their activities 
should not be confined to breeding a few 
foreign species. 



Statement of Mr. John B. Burnham, 
President American Game Pro- 
tective Association. 

Mr. Burnham, Mr. Chairman and Gen- 
tlemen, I represent the American Game 
Protective Association, which is a na- 
tional association. 

I want to make the point, which I be- 
lieve is important, that if you gentlemen 
report this bill favorably and it passes 
Congress it will not reduce the food sup- 
ply of the country one pound. The con- 
ditions in this country are such to-day 
that all the game is killed that the sup- 
ply will stand. There is practically no 
section of the United States' to-day where 
there is any surplus. We do not have 
the old large areas we used to have,, 
where men could go in and kill and ship 
to market to a large extent without de- 
pleting the supply. Every game bird 
which is shot to-day is used as food. It 
is not thrown away. The fact of per- 
mitting its sale simply permits that bird 
to be used by some rich man rather than 
by the man who takes it, or some poor 



THE GAME BREEDER 



111 



man. In New York State, where the sale 
of game is prohibited, the game is used 
for the food of the person living in that 
state, or the person that takes the game, 
or is given to friends. Every game bird 
that is shot and eaten, of course, releases 
a certain supply of food, because people 
can eat only so much meat. 

Now in America we have necessarily a 
different system of game protection than 
they have in the old countries. I have 
heard this question of the nonsale of 
game argued in a great many States in 
the country, and very frequently it is sta- 
ted that in Europe game is commonly 
found in the markets and that it is cheap- 
er there — game birds, for example- -than 
poultry.. Now that is a fact, particularly 
in England, and the reason for that is 
their system of game protection. It is 
the rich man's game in England, but in 
order to prevent poaching on their pre- 
serves the game that is shot is almost 
entirely put on the markets to keep the 
price of game down, just for that one 
purpose. If a man goes from this coun- 
try and shoots on Andrew Carnegie's 
preserve in Scotland he has to furnish his 
own ammunition. He can go out there 
and join the big pheasant shoot, where, 
for example, a thousand or more pheas- 
ants are shot in one of those drives, but 
he is not privileged to take a single one 
of those birds away with him when he 
leaves. He has some of those birds on 
the table, but the big majority of the 
birds that are shot in these hunting par- 
ties are put on the market, and any 
man who would vary that principle would 
be ostracized among that class of rich 
men who have those shooting preserves, 
because they have a definite object in do- 
ing that, and that object is to keep the 
price of this game so low in the market 
that there is no inducement for the poach- 
er to come on their land and kill these 
birds surreptiously. 

In this country, dating back prior to 
the time of the Revolution, we started 
on a different system. Our law has been 
made, of course, considerably since that 
time by the courts. According to the 
American -law — court made — the game is 
the property of the State, held in trust 



for all the people. That means that each 
individual has a certain undivided inter- 
est in the game of his state. We could 
not follow the English principle here 
without upsetting what most Americans 
consider a system way ahead of the old 
continental and European system, where 
only the rich men have the privilege of 
shoting. We do not want that system 
in this country. The free shooting which 
is obtained in the United States has been 
one of our greatest national safeguards. 
Our men who are going abroad to-day. 
take them man for man, know how to 
shoot better than any European army, 
and therefore will be more valuable. 
Kitchener and Pershing have both called 
for men who can shoot. • Our men are 
familiar with firearms ; they are familiar 
with going out in the open and taking 
care of themselves, and therefore that 
class of men, trained under American 
conditions of free shooting, make much 
better soldiers than the average Euro- 
pean. And, moreover, this practice of 
free shooting is very valuable to the na- 
tional health of the country. We do not 
want to adopt the European preserve 
system ; we do not want to adopt the sale 
of game which goes with it. 

Now, I have had an experience of 
about twenty-five years in game protec- 
tion and I have been around in most of 
the states on these questions, and I feel 
competent to say that in the whole Uni- 
ted States there isn't an organization of 
sportsmen, there isn't an agricultural or- 
ganization, that would not be behind this 
bill of Air. Graham's. They have real- 
ized that from the farmer's standpoint 
game is valuable, and from the sports- 
man's standpoint they can not have game 
along with laws permitting the sale of 
game. They want the system where the 
game will be divided up among the larg- 
est number of men. Where you have 
market shooting and the sale of game, a 
few men spend their time taking this 
game, and they shoot it off so that there 
is nothing left — or little left — for the 
man who only has a day or two occa- 
sionally to go out shooting. They want 
that commercialism stopped, because the 
time is coming in this country when there 



112 



THE GAME BREEDER 



won't be enough to go around. That plan 
would be all right when there was a 
large amount of game to shoot, but it 
won't do to-day. 

I want to make another point in clos- 
ing — and that is in addition to what has 
already been said — that by stopping the 
sale of game in the District of Columbia 
you will stop the killing of game in the 
surrounding states and presrve that for 
the ordinary sportsman, the man who has 
got to get his shooting close at hand or not 
at all. The rich man can have his pre- 
serve or go a long distance away in his 
private car to some wild section and 
shoot, but the poor man has got to get his 
shooting close at hand or not at all. This 
bill will preserve the shooting for that 
poor man, for the average citizen, the 
man who makes a good American. 

Under present conditions the District 
of Columbia is draining the game re- 
sources of the States of Maryland and 
Virginia and a number of other Southern 
states. I know personally that the rep- 
resentatives of the farmers and game as- 
sociations of those states are heartily in 
favor of this bill and I understand that 
"Mr. Graham has testimony from those 
men. A year ago last winter I was talk- 
ing with a market shooter in North Caro- 
lina, which still permits some market 
shooting at certain periods, and he told 
me that he and his brother made an 
average of $1 1 a day during the time wild 
fowl were permitted to be shot for sale. 
They were shooting geese. They had a 
lot of live geese decoys, and he told me 
they got 50 cents apiece. The price had 
been raised from 25 cents, and at 50 
cents apiece those men were making $11 
a day shooting those geese, which were 
sent up here to the Washington market. 
Now, that means less geese for the local 
men living in North Carolina. 

The first state in the Union to pass a 
nonsale game law was the State of Texas. 
The southern states have been well to 
the fore in this matter of looking after 
their game, preserving it for their own 
citizens, and if you gentlemen will fa- 
vorably report this bill and put it through 
it will do more to protect the game of 



the Union than almost any other thing 
that can be done at the present time for 
the people that should have it for use. 

Mr. Wheeler. Let me ask you this 
question: What do you consider to be 
the chief object of these game laws? 
Are they only for the protection of 
sportsmen, or what are they for? 

Mr. Burnham. I think the chief object 
is to keep up the supply for shooting. 

Mr. Wheeler. For shooting? 

Mr. Burnham Yes ; just so the sup- 
ply will not be destroyed. 

Mr. Wheeler. Then it is to secure 
sport. 

Mr. Burnham. To keep breeding stock 
up; yes. 

Mr. Mason. You do not mean entire- 
ly for sport, do you? What we call the 
sportsman doesn't shoot entirely for 
sport. He doesn't shoot a bird that isn't 
eatable. 

Mr. Burnham. No ; it is for sport and 
food, and the general recreation, and also 
incidentally it benefits the farmer, be- 
cause these birds all have some agricul- 
tural value. 

Mr. Crosser. Of course, if you are 
looking at it from the standpoint of the 
agricultural value, you wouldn't be 
thinking about shooting them at all, 
would you ? 

Mr. Burnham. Well, perhaps not. It 
is utilization to the greatest extent pos- 
sible. 

Mr. Crosser. I am not quarreling 
with you. I just want to* get your view- 
point from a rather fundamental stand- 
point, whether you had objection to the 
killing of game, or whether your pur- 
pose was to increase the supply of game. 

Mr. Burnham. The purpose is to in- 
crease the supply of game. 



No Grumbling. 

It ain't no use to grumble and complain, 
It's jest as cheap and easy to rejoice; 

When God sorts out the weather and 
sends rain, 
W'y, rain's my choice. — Riley. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



113 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



A New Foster Mother. 

Mr. Bullock, manager of the Scarboro 
Beach Game Farm, Scarboro, Maine, 
writes : 

This year I am going to cross all my 
Silky cocks with R. I. Red hens. I did 
a few last year and they turned out so 
good that I am going to turn my whole 
flock of hens into crosses except a few. 
I have some cross cocks, last year's, for 
$1.00 each. 

In making this cross I think it is a 
problem solved for they make wonderful 
mothers for pheasants, being a little 
larger than the bantam and, therefore, 
will take more eggs ; also they are not 
heavy and will not kill the young birds 
in the nest as the common hen will. 

I think the members of our society 
will find this cross interesting. 

In regards to the mallard eggs I think 
ours is a very good line of birds. I 
am going to try and hatch somewhere 
near one thousand and let them go in 
our large pond after they have gotten 
•old enough to look out for themselves. 

Could you tell me of any place in the 
south where I could make arrangements 
to buy some trapped mallards? I would 
like to get about fifty clear wild birds 
next fall. 

You will be interested to know that 
my black duck have started to lay a lit- 
tle. Yesterday I found two nests, one 
with ten eggs and one with two, and also 
noted quite a few places where they had 
started nests. 

Perhaps I can be able to ship you 
some in about two weeks. 



Why We Have No Quail. 

Mr. Bridges, a Maryland wild turkey 
breeder, writes : 

I have no quail for sale at all. The 
only thing I am raising now is the wild 
-turkey. It seems impossible to get any 
•of the American quail as the law does 
;not seem to allow it. 



Good Work. 

Rodney E. Marshall, city editor of the 
Portland Daily Press, Portland, Maine, 
says: 

"For the first time in the history of 
the city of Portland, Me., countless thou- 
sands of wild ducks were driven into 
Back Bay, an inlet from Portland Har- 
bor and bordering the residential section 
of the city, by the extreme cold weather. 
At one time game wardens estimated 50,- 
000 black ducks were to be found on 
the ice and so acute did their sufferings 
become for want of food that State 
Game Warden George Cushman was au- 
thorized by the state fish and game de- 
partment to feed the birds. 

Food was distributed as ordered and 
the birds fought hungrily to pick up the 
morsels thrown to them by the state of- 
ficers. R. L. Bullock, manager of the 
Scarboro, Me., wild game farm, snared 
hundreds in nets and took them to his 
farm for breeding purposes." — Reming- 
ton Live News Notes. 



Eagles Attack Aviator. 

Paris, Jan. 5 (by mail). — Captain Mor- 
tureux, a pilot in the French aviation 
service, has just arrived here on fur- 
lough from Saloniki, where he was at- 
tached to the Army of the Orient, bring- 
ing with him two stuffed eagles which 
he shot down with his machine gun when 
they attacked him during a flight he made 
over the Bulgarian lines in Macedonia. 

This is the first authentic case on rec- 
ord in the annals of European aviation 
when a bird has attacked an aeroplane. 

The aerial battle between Captain 
Mortureux and the two giant birds was 
witnessed by British and French troops 
in the advanced trenches over which the 
contest was fought. The bodies of the 
eagles were later picked up by soldiers. 
One eagle is a male and the other — the 
larger one— a female. They measure 
nearly ten feet from wing tip to wing tip 



114 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and stood more than four feet in height. 

"I was making a patrol over the Bul- 
garian lines early one morning when I 
saw the two eagles," said Captain Mor- 
tureux, telling his story. "They flew 
straight toward me and although my ma- 
chine was faster than they were they 
kept hovering near me, since I had to 
swing back and forth along a certain 
length of the front. 

"One of the birds darted toward me 
just as I was turning. The roar of the 
motor and the flashing propeller blades 
didn't scare him a bit. I was afraid he 
might get his talons in one of my wings 
and tear the canvas so I cruised across 
to a position over our lines. 

"The birds followed right after me, 
so I decided to attack one of them, just 
to see what he would do. I 'banked' to 
slow down and waited until the eagles 
were directly above and in front of me. 

"Then I pointed the nose of the ma- 
chine up and started to climb right to- 
ward them at tremendous speed. I pull- 
ed the trigger, and the machine gun be- 
gan to chatter. Twenty-five rounds got 
both of them. They fell screaming and 
flapping to earth. 

"Later, back in the city, I had a Greek 
taxidermist mount them. We captured a 
German aviator down there some time 
ago who told us that an eagle had raided 
one of their mess camps one day and 
carried off a side of beef. The Balkan 
eagles are very voracious." 

Captain Mortureux intends to present 
one of the eagles to a Paris museum and 
will keep the other as a trophy. 

Daring Owls. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

Perhaps you can give us a little in- 
formation that will keep us out of jail. 
The cemetery has been infested with 
owls this winter, and several people pass- 
ing through the cemetery at night, and 
in the early morning, have been followed 
and annoyed by them. Is there any law 
preventing us from shooting these birds, 
and if we shoot them can we have them 
stuffed ? A stuffed owl might look good 
in the office — quite in keeping with the 
sobriety of the surroundings. Is there 



any law to interfere with our decorating 
the office in this way ? 

Thanking you in advance for steering 
us aright in this situation, we are, 
Robert L. Mott, Supt., 
Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Long Island, N. Y. 

[Write to the State Game Department, Al- 
bany, N. Y., for information as to' when 
Cemetery Owls are in season. — Editor.] 

One Day Old Wild Ducks. 

We heard of several sales last week 
of one-day-old wild ducks. The prices 
were forty and fifty cents per duck. 
Very few ducks were to be had at the 
lower price and these quickly were sold. 
We hope purchasers in various parts of 
the country will report the result of the 
shipments, stating the distance traveled, 
the percentage of live arrivals and the 
percentage raised to maturity. 

Some breeders do not seem to- desire 
publicity and the annoyance (which some 
complain of) following the publication 
of their names. We will publish initials 
when requested to do so. It is more 
interesting to have the full facts : the 
names and locations of both shipper and 
purchaser. The Game Conservation So- 
ciety will publish the facts about the ar- 
rival of game and eggs at the Long Isl- 
and Game Breeders Association and the 
percentages referred to and it will also 
give the source of supply in cases where 
the shippers authorize this. The Society 
receives no game illegally obtained but 
where it discovers a rare and unexplored 
mine of prairie chickens and other grouse 
and quail, etc., it is evident that the mine 
might be overworked if every one tried 
to secure game at the same time. 

Wild Bird Intelligence. 

A striking example of wild-bird intel- 
ligence has been observed on the Panama 
Canal in connection with the underwater 
blasting that is carried on there. 

A barge has been especially equipped 
for drilling blast holes below the water 
and depositing charges in them. When 
a blast is ready the craft moves off to a 
safe distance, and before setting off the 
dynamite the barge whistle is blown sev- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



115 



eral times to warn all vessels in the 
vicinity. 

Instantly numbers of wild birds may 
be seen coming from all directions, the 
reason being they have learned that 
many dead and stunned fish rise to the 
surface of the water following each ex- 
plosion. To them this particular whistle 
is like a dinner gong. More remarkable 
still, they readily distinguish between 
this whistle and others. Canal workmen 
and natives also share in the harvest. 

[Game breeders know that hand-reared wild 
ducks soon learn to come to dinner when a 
horn is sounded. We made this discovery 
long ago, when our black ducks came in to 
feed with some setter puppies which were 
being taught to respond to a dog whistle. The 
ducks flew in to feed with the dogs. One of 
our members always uses a dog whistle to 
call his ducks from the marsh. At the Clove 
Valley Club the call is sounded on a military 
bugle. Many use a tin horn. — Editor.] 

Black Duck— Mallard Hybrids. 

Mr. Holmes, whose advertisement ap- 
pears on another page, is a large breeder 
of black fuck-mallard hybirds. These 
ducks have long been used for decoys in 
New England and they lay large num- 
bers of eggs under control. 

Mr. Holmes gives his ducks a wide 
range and they fly from the patches of 
wild rose and briars where they nest to 
the feeding ground and return on the 
wing to their nests. He says he found 
some of the ducks nesting in briars which 
seemed almost impenetrable ; two ducks 
hatching a large number of eggs were 
found sitting side by side. 

Although many breeders prefer 
straight-bred ducks and other game birds 
we can see no reason why this hybrid 
should not be extensively used for sport 
since the birds are reported as strong and 
fast on the wing as the wildest wild 
ducks are. 

The pheasants used for sport both in 
England and in America are nearly all 
hybrids. It is said that it is unusual to 
see a pure bred ring-necked pheasant or 
a pure bred dark-necked pheasant in the 
London markets. Many of the birds shot 
and sold show a cross between the spe- 
cies named and some incidently have been 
crossed with Mongolian and even Japa- 
nese pheasants. 

The breeders of black ducks all report 



that fresh-trapped birds do not lay for 
one or more years and very few breed- 
ers can furnish black ducks or eggs suit- 
able for breeding purposes. The de- 
mands for sport now are so large that 
we can see no reason why the strong 
flying hybrid ducks which are excellent 
on the table should not be used on many 
preserves. They surely are far superior 
to many of the commercial mallards, 
some of which are not nearly strong 
enough on the wing to satisfy the de- 
mands of sport. 

The black duck-mallard hybrid should 
be a valuable bird for those who wish 
to have black ducks. By crossing the 
true wild black duck with the hybrid it 
seems likely that a duck which for all 
practical purposes is or appears to be a 
pure bred black can be produced which 
will lay eggs abundantly under control 
just as the mallard and near-mallards 
do. 

In all probability the black duck-mal- 
lard hybrid is entirely exempt from game 
laws. It is not named in any of the 
statutes which prevent the production, 
shooting or "having in possession" of 
certain species. We are quite sure the 
courts will hold that such a new species 
produced by industry for food and not 
mentioned in any statute is not governed 
by laws protecting certain species enu- 
merated in the statutes. We feel certain 
we are right in this opinion, and if so 
the hybrid should be a valuable duck for 
shooting clubs, game farms and preserves 
in the states which have not yet re- 
paired their game laws so as to encourage 
food production. 

To Transplant Reindeer. 

Cordova, Alaska, June 22. — Alaska 
reindeer, which heretofore have roamed 
only in the tundra country of the Sew- 
ard Peninsula of Northwestern Alaska, 
are to be planted in the Copper River 
valley of Southwestern Alaska, north of 
Cordova. The reindeer originally were 
brought from Siberia and transplanted in 
Northwestern Alaska. The task of 
transplanting the animals has been un- 
dertaken by the Bureau of Native Edu- 
cation. Herders will bring the deer over- 
land this spring from Nome to Cordova, 
a distance of approximately 900 miles. 



116 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Bob Acres. 

Two Kentuckians, Lawrence Jones and 
J. Lyle Bayliss of Lexington, Ky., have 
bought the island Bob Acres and intend 
to convert it into a sanctuary for wild 
fowl. It comprises some 10,000 acres, 
and its new owners expect to make of 
it an immense heronry. They have also 
asked the Louisiana Conservation Com- 
mission to set aside Lake Piegneu, which 
adjoins their property, as a water resort 
for ducks, which flock there in the winter 
season. 

All bird-lovers will rejoice at this new 
refuge for water fowl and under the 
name of Bob Acres the new sanctuary 
will remain a permanent memorial of one 
of the best-loved personalities of the 
American stage. 

Bob Acres was named by the actor Joe 
Jefferson when he purchased the island in 
Iberia Parish for a winter home. If our 
memory serves us rightly he and his 
friend, the late President Cleveland, used 
to shoot wild ducks there. We believe 
if they were living they would like to see 
the place conducted as a shooting and 
food-producing plant. 

An Interesting Letter from Alberta, 
Canada. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

Received the acknowledgment of my 
letter and also a long letter from Mr. 
Huntington concerning game conditions 
in this country. 

At present it is not feasible to get per- 
mission to export grouse. I hope to get 
me an enlarged edition of the old mar- 
ket hunters quail net next summer to 
trap Hungarian partridges with. Think 
the only time that chickens could be 
trapped in any number would be in Au- 
gust. Then a man should have a pen 
with plenty of cover in it to keep them 
until they are grown. 

Will send you three subscriptions scat- 
tered round the country I have the most 
interest in. These men can wield a great 
deal of influence if they only will. More 
than that, I have often heard my father 
say that all quail needed to make them 
plentiful in southern Ohio was plenty of 
feed, cover and water. The other two 



should know this to be a fact as we hunt- 
ed together where we had plenty of 
quail and in most of the state there were 
none. 

I am afraid the sharp-tailed grouse 
would not be a satisfactory game pre- 
serve bird. He doesn't migrate, but he 
often ranges over a country miles across. 
We do not need to plant coverts in order 
to make them plentiful here at present. 
This is a very rolling prairie country cut 
up by coulees. The coulees have big 
thickets of native poplar (quaking asp 
probably) and white spruce in them. 
Scattered in patches all over the prairie 
are small clumps of a small berry bearing 
bush from twelve to eighteen inches tall. 
This bush furnishes a berry for winter 
feed and a fine nesting place for both 
chicken and ducks. In the small draws 
we have clumps of native willows, haw- 
thorns, choke cherries and wild roses. 
While on the tops of the hills and dry 
hillsides we have another berry bearing 
bush, which the natives gall Bullberry. 

Crows and magpies are the real game 
enemies, especially the former. One of 
my neighbors said that two years ago the 
crows broke up about twenty ducks nests 
on two hundred acres. At present only 
about one-fifteenth of this land is occu- 
pied. It would be impossible for any one 
individual to make much headway 
against Crows. 

My partner proposes that we feed the 
crows until they come to a place regu- 
larly and then give them a bait of grain 
soaked in cyanide of potash. _We would 
be pleased to get any information you 
can give us about the control of these 
two pests without too great an outlay. 

A friend of mine in England has been 
sending me copies of the Field and Game 
Keeper. They are actually, killing down 
the game birds in England because the 
birds are too plentiful. England has just 
the laws you advocate. If a small coun- 
try like England can do this, what could 
our own country do, if we could get rid 
of the doctor and his money? It also 
seems to me that game farms such as you 
advocate and the insectivorous birds go 
hand in hand. 

One of the copies of The Game Breed- 
er gives directions for telling the sex of 



THE GAME BREEDER 



117 



Hungarian partridges. This article says 
the method is infallible in the winter time. 

Can you tell me if English rabbits and 
hares have been imported into the Uni- 
ted States and if they have how they 
have done? Can you tell me anything 
about the two bird books published by 
the Massachusetts department of agricul- 
ture? 

As to our ruffed grouse becoming 
scarce, we have had two bad berry years. 
In 1916 there were practically no berries, 
and in 1917 there was not one-tenth of 
a crop. Then there is a very marked 
increase in crows and magpies, and these 
birds breed in the partridge or ruffed 
grouse cover. Also two bad hatching 
seasons and two extremely bad winters. 

If you can tell me the cause of this 
peculiarity in human nature, it will not 
only give me a lot of satisfaction, but 
it should be worth a lot of money to me, 
if I can apply it. In this country, with 
game conditions as they are, bench show 
setters are in demand ; bench show wolf- 
hounds bring up to SI 50 as pups; bench 
show airedales, foxterriers, Irish terriers 
bring around $25 each as pups ; bulldogs, 
Bostons and the toys bring from $25 to 
$75 each as pups. 

There is no demand for setter or point- 
er or Chesapeake pups of a first-class 
working strain. It is very hard to sell 
them at from $15 to $20 each. We can 
buy extra large registered, trained Rus- 
sian wolfhounds, guaranteed to be fast 
and dead game, for $75 or less each. 
Best pups of this strain $25 to $30. A 
man will pay $50 for a bull pup, and hunt 
chicken without a dog and wade in ice 
water after his ducks. He will pay $75 
for a sore-eyed poodle and insist that 
he wants a bird dog but can not afford 
to pay $15 for a good pup. I never ex- 
pect to make any money out of dogs, 
but the psychology is too deep for me 

F. V. 
Alberta, Canada. 

Shades of Izaac Walton. 

A man who confined his activities to 
fishing has been sent up for six months 
in Syracuse under the new anti-loafing 
law. Shades of Isaak Walton! — Even- 
ing Mail. 



Crowd Captures a Deer. 

Anderson, Ind., June 1. — A live deer 
was caught the other day in Hazlewood, 
a suburb of Anderson. The deer escaped 
from the Weslow deer farm, west of the 
city, and had been at large. When seen 
in Hazlewood it was pursued by a crowd 
of men and boys until it was run down. 



Country Clubs in Time of War. 

In the "Fete de Mai" to be held on 
Memorial Day at the Sleepy Hollow 
Country Club there is a suggestion which 
might well be adopted throughout the 
United States this year. To many a 
member of an organization of that kind 
the thought must have come — why a 
country club in wartime unless it contrib- 
utes in some way to the common cause, 
and how can a country club do that? It 
may be that by making itself a center 
for attractive entertainments for war 
charities the Sleepy Hollow club has re- 
moved the doubts referred to and an- 
swered the questions of the doubters. 

Not many country clubs would be able 
to command the quantity and the quality 
of talent gathered together by the Sleepy 
Hollow club for its Thursday entertain- 
ment, but each city has its talented ama- 
teurs. Performances given by these 
would prove a strong attraction, and by 
following the Sleepy Hollow example 
other country clubs can become valuable 
factors in raising money for war chari- 
ties. 

The experiment is well worth trying. 
Unless they in some way play a part in 
meeting the national need of wartime 
there will be no favorable answer to the 
question — "why the country club?" 

[Many of the country clubs which have 
game will produce thousands of wild food 
birds. The crops will be harvested by sports- 
men rejected for military duty, and since no 
charge for their labor is made by the har- 
vesters and, in fact, they pay to produce the 
food, country clubs of this kind are doing a 
great public service. Under the direction of 
the Game Conservation Society some of these 
clubs will contribute a good lot of game to 
hospitals which entertain soldiers and sailors 
returning from France. — Editor.] 



118 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, JULY, 191*. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Hvntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto. Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



We believe all of the states should 
permit game breeders to breed all species 
of game without any charge for a license. 
"This method has been given a fair trial 
in Massachusetts and has been found to 
"be practical and popular. It is a poor 
time to discourage the production of 
highly desirable foods. 



It is a very good plan for game breed- 
ers who have anything to sell to send 
their advertisements to the magazine 
without waiting to be asked to do so. 
All of our young men are' in the service 
— every one, in fact, the Government 
would take — and the old folks left to 
run the society and its publication are 
entirely too busy creating new shoots 
and customers for the advertisers and 
in procuring information and stories in- 
teresting to readers, with an occasional 
look around to see how the game law 
enthusiasts and sport prohibitionists are 
getting on, to be able to give much at- 
tention to business. So don't wait to be 
asked to advertise. We can always make 
room for one more good and reliable 
game breeder provided the copy is re- 
ceived before the press is running. 



We get new subscribers every day but 
the more the better for all hands. Every 
new member is a probable purchaser 
and is likely to get his neighbor into the 



game. We expect to send The Game 
Breeder to twenty or twenty-five thou- 
sand new people before the first of the 
year and if the present percentage of 
those to whom it is offered and who be- 
come regular readers holds good, we 
should have many thousand more regu- 
lar readers by the end of the year. 



Many of our readers send subscrip- 
tions for others. This is a good habit. 
We also wish those who write to us to 
send us lists of likely names. We try 
each month to print enough copies for 
all newcomers but the last month many 
could not be supplied with the current 
number and those who came to the office 
towards the end of the month were told 
that all copies were sold. As a food pro- 
ducing industry game breeding is timely 
and properly thriving. There will be a 
shooting boom when the cruel war is 
over. 



NOT THE RICH ONLY. 

It is not "only the rich," as Mr. Burn- 
ham and other game politicians would 
make it appear, who are producing game 
abundantly in many of the United States. 
There are many thousands of game far- 
mers, many of them of small means, in- 
cluding several hundred women. There 
are thousands of sportsmen who have 
formed game producing clubs. In some 
cases the dues are only $15 per year. It 
must be evident that the rich easily can 
have an abundance of game on their 
farms and country places. It is the 
poorer classes who can only afford to 
have game provided they can sell part of 
their crop to help pay the cost of pro- 
duction. We are very much surprised to 
find Mr. Burnham attempting to excite 
prejudice against the game farmers, rich 
and poor, at this time when food pro- 
duction should be and is popular. His 
statement to the Congressional commit- 
tee displays a remarkable lack of knowl- 
edge of the subject. Thousands of mar- 
ket gunners (by no means rich) shoot 
and sell the migratory fowl taken on the 
public waters in populous England, just 
as our oystermen take and sell the fish. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



119 



Congress should not be stampeded by 
professional game law lobbyists. It 
should investigate the subject carefully 
before making any ill-advised laws pre- 
venting the sale of food. We are sur- 
prised that there should be any opposition 
to a game breeding industry which it is 
admitted will make game very cheap in 
all of the markets. Mr. Burnham's rea- 
son why the game is so cheap in England 
is amusing. 

Mr. Burnham's statement before the 
Congressional committee is so interesting 
and amusing that we believe our readers 
will enjoy reading it in full. It is printed 
on another page. The idea of sports- 
men having to pay for their ammunition 
when they go to a pheasant (?) drive 
on Andrew Carnegie's grouse shoot in- 
dicates that the place is quite as demo- 
cratic as such places are in America. We 
fail to see why Mr. Burnham complains 
of the hardship, or what bearing his com- 
plaint has on the bill under discussion, 
intended to prevent the sale or "having 
in possession" of game birds in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. 



WHY NOT A BUREAU OF GAME? 

The National Fancier and Breeder 
urges its readers to write to their sena- 
tors and congressmen urging that the 
Government establish a rabbit raising bu- 
reau. The Game Breeder endorses this 
idea but suggests that it be enlarged and 
that the bureau be termed the U. S. 
Bureau of Game. The pheasants, ducks, 
wild turkeys and other birds desirable 
for human food and the elk, deer, ante- 
lope and other big game animals owned 
by breeders are now being produced in 
large numbers and it would seem that 
these foods which are inexpensively rear- 
ed by those who know how are quite as 
important as the rabbits which no doubt 
just now occupy an important place on 
our food map. We hope the National 
Fancier and Breeder will amend its pro- 
gram and go in for a bureau of game 
with a big rabbit department. There are 
no department or government officials 
apparently in Washington who take any 
interest in game as food. The little at- 
tention given to the subject has been in 



the direction of tabulating the thousands 
of game laws which until recently made 
food production criminal strange as 
such crime may appear. 

There is an excellent U. S. Bureau 
of Fisheries. Let us by all means have 
a good U. S. Bureau of Game and in two 
years at the outside we believe all of the 
people will have all of the game they 
can eat at prices surprisingly small. The 
rabbit breeders and the game breeders 
should work together and if they can 
have the encouragement of a bureau of 
game we are quite sure the results will 
be fine. 

Good statesmanship requires such gov- 
ernmental aid; small politics may keep 
up an opposition to the industry. 



A FEW THINGS. 

We want to know a few things. 

Provided the migratory bird bill be- 
comes a law can the owners and breeders 
of migratory wild fowl (or the descend- 
ants of fowl which once migrated and 
would do so again if given the chance) 
have such birds in possession? 

Can they sell and ship such birds ? 

Can they have the eggs of such birds 
in possession? 

Can they sell and ship eggs ? 

Can they trap migratory birds for 
breeding purposes, provided the state of- 
ficers permit them to do so ? 

Can they do any of these things if 
state laws permit the industry referred 
to? 

We doubt if many sportsmen or game 
breeders, excepting readers of The Game 
Breeder, ever knew or ever will know or 
understand the terms of the migratory 
bill. It seems certain that few people 
will ever know the numerous criminal 
regulations which are or will be made by 
those to whom Congress delegates its 
crime making power, until they happen 
to get arrested for having food birds in 
their possession or for some other ab- 
surd crime. 

We are expecting some shipments of 
teal and other migratory fowl for breed- 
ing purposes. We propose to breed a 
lot of game and donate it to hospitals 
which entertain soldiers and sailors com- 



120 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ing from abroad. Are we in danger of 
being arrested for having the stock birds 
shipped to us by breeders or for having 
them or the eggs " in possession"? 

Many of our members own and breed 
migratory wild fowl and sell the birds 
and the eggs. Will they be in danger of 
being arrested if they sell, ship or have 
the birds or eggs in possession? 

We want information about these mat- 
ters at once. 

Is it imperative that game food should 
be kept out of the hospitals as a war 
emergency measure ? 

Can W. J. Mackensen in Pennsylvania, 
Mr. Bullock in Maine or Mr. Mcllhenny 
in Louisiana, or can any others of our 
thousnds of members send us stock 
birds or dead birds for the purposes re- 
ferred to? 

We would like to know at once. 

Can any Congressman who voted for 
the bill answer any or all of these ques- 
tions and tell food producers how to keep 
out of jail in war times ? 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

I notice in your last issue in the Sur- 
vey an item entitled "More Rabbits." 

I have a place in New Jersey and am 
much troubled . with depredations in the 
garden of the ordinary "cotton tail." 
Can you give me any advice as to proper 
methods of stopping this damage? 

James R. Strong. 

New Jersey. 

[A few Beagles and a shotgun will be ef- 
fective and will produce some food. Rabbits 
easily are trapped, but before trying this write 
to the State Game Department, Trenton, and 
see if you must retain the State animals in 
your garden. — Editor.] 

The Game Conservation Society. 

I have been taking The Game Breeder 
for several months and I like it so well 
I want the magazine sent to one of my 
friends. I am enclosing $1.00 to pay 
for one year's subscription commencing 
with the June number. 

(Name and address enclosed.) 

Kansas. Geo. E. King. 

[We regret that we cannot begin the sub- 
scription with the June number. The edi- 
tion was entirely sold within a few days after 



it appeared. We have been obliged to refuse 
at least twenty-five requests for this number. 
Your letter like many similar ones is most 
encouraging and gratifying. The number of 
people who believe that it should not be 
criminal just now to produce any species of 
food on a farm or to have game birds in 
posession, to transport them and sell them 
and the eggs, when produced by industry, 
is increasing. We have a notion the Kans, .. 
farmers can select candidates for the legisla- 
ture who are not opposed to the farmers going 
into the very profitable game farming industry, 
now legal in many other states. — Editor.] 

Readers who are willing to let us have 
copies of the June, 1918, number will 
please send us a postcard to that effect. 
We will pay 30 cents each for thirty 
copies of this issue. 



The Marmot Pheasantry. 

The Marmot Pheasantrv is located 
thirty-five miles from Portland, Oregon, 
in the Cascade Mountains near Mt. Hood. 

We raise the Dure Chinese Ringneck 
(Phasianus torquatus), the pure Mon- 
golian (Phasianus mongolicus) and the 
cross of these two birds. We find that 
this cross matures far more rapidly than 
either the Chinese or English, is hardier, 
larger and more satisfactory as a real 
game bird in every way. We also raise 
the Lady Amherst, Reeves, Golden and 
Silver. Japanese Silkys, Buff Cochin 
Bantams and New Zealand and Flemish 
Giant Rabbits. The rabbit end of the 
business was originally a side issue, but 
has developed until they take nearly all 
of one man's time. We also have ponies, 
pea fowl, doves, etc. Not mentioning 
dogs of various breeds. 

At the present time (June 23d) we 
have about two thousand birds in the 
field and two thousand eggs setting. 

We use movable coops four feet by 
eight feet the first three weeks, after 
which the birds are placed in movable 
pens sixteen feet by sixteen feet. 

The young birds are fed Spratts' 
Pheasant Feed mixed with hard-boiled 
egg, chopped lettuce, maggots and chick 
feed. 

We buy smelt bv the ton for the mag- 
gots and have them frozen in boxes and 
get them as needed. 

For the old birds our pens are eighteen 
feet by thirty-two feet. We feed them 



THE GAME BREEDER 



121 



a mash of Spratts' Pheasant Feed No. 3 
mixed with rolled oats in the morning 
with a little Cardiac added twice a week 
and dry grain at night. They also get 
green ground bone and kale (green feed) 
every other day. 

We are particularly careful about in- 
breeding, as nothing will cut down the 
size of the birds faster. 

We never ship a bird that we wouldn't 
want in our own breeding pens and con- 
sequently have not one dissatisfied cus- 
tomer on our list. 

Mongolian-Ringneck Hybrids. 

In our opinion there are no better 
pheasants for the game preserve than 
the ringnecked-Mongolian cross. The 
Mongolian is a big, hardy ringneck and 
seems to add size and speed to the Chi- 
nese ringneck, which it much resembles. 
We were not aware of the fact stated by 
the Marmot Pheasantry, Marmot, Ore- 
gon, that this cross matures far more 
rapidly than either the Chinese or the 
English pheasants do. This is an im- 
portant fact, since it is highly desirable 
to begin the shooting the last of Septem- 
ber or early October when it is delight- 
ful to be out of doors and to have a long 
open season. 



^commended Game and TrapLoads 



Thirty-three Lynn Bogue Hunt Paint- 
ings of Game on New Remington 
Shotshell Chart for Hunters. 

For an example of practical service to 
shooters, especially in view of the present 
necessary high cost of ammunition, it would 
be difficult to find anything more appropriate 
than the new art hanger devoted to "Recom- 
mended Game and Trap Loads" which the Rem- 
ington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Com- 
pany, Inc., has just issued. And yet, while 
the purpose of this hanger is to help shooters 
choose shells which will render best service- 
enabling one properly selected shell to do 
what two ill chosen ones might fail at — it 
at the same time has unusual artistic and 
educational value. 

Briefly, the hanger, which is a full color 
lithograph, 20x26 inches in dimensions, is di- 
vided into nine panels, eight of which are de- 
voted to loads for small game and one to traD 
loads. In each panel except the last, appear 
full-color reproductions of new natural his- 
tory paintings by the celebrated naturalist- 
artist, Lynn Bogue Hunt. Thirty different 
snecies of leading American game birds are 
depicted, and three game animals, and in this 




work Hunt has equalled, if not surpassed, his 
best efforts. These splendid pictures will 
gladden the heart of every old sportsman, 
who has a favorite game bird, for every one 
of them is absolutely' true to life ; in fact the 
illustrations provide just as valuable a check- 
list as does the type matter pertaining to shot- 
gun loads. The characteristic markings of 
the game are displayed in all cases, making 
the illustrations especially useful for identi- 
fication purposes. At the same time, the artis- 
tic effect is most pleasing — as of course the 
American sportsmen have learned to expect 
from this gifted illustrator, whose natural 
history studies in color are always true works 
of art. 

Seventy-eight standard loads are given, for 
guns ranging from 10 to 20 gauge, but of 
course there are many duplications, inasmuch 
as there are nine separate tables each devoted 
to a certain class of shooting. For example, 
the first takes in jacksnipe, sora and woodcock, 
while the last is confined entirely to trap loads. 
There is no attempt, however, to recommend 
a particular load for any one kind of game 
in all localities ; those given are selected to 
give best results under general conditions. And 
considering the very great experience of the 
Remington U. M. C. people in supplying arms 
and ammunition for use all over the world, no 
better guide could be followed by the average 
hunter. In fact, the more that is done by such 
large manufacturers to standardize the loads 
in shotgun shells, the better it will be for the 
shooters, to say nothing of the dealers. 

In past years a tremendous amount of good 
powder and lead has gone to waste, due to 
lack of knowledge among shooters of what 

(Continued on page 124.) 



122 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 
FOR IGAME PRESERVES 

i 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about Our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

; jBecome acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbablepost, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. H. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 

GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Pheasant and Mallard Eggs for Spring delivery from 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



Pheasant Eggs from good strong 
ringnecks. 


$18.00 per hundred eggs 


$10.00 per fifty eggs 


WILLIAM RAY BALDWIN, 


ELK MILLS. - - MARYLAND 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies, pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS* NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



123 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 



FOR SALE 



Hatched This Year 



Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD \ SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

jTbTWHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



RAISE MALLARDS 

Eggs for Hatching — Manitoba Stock 

Setting $3.00 

Hundred 20.00 

Strong Flying Birds— Prompt Delivery 

HEMLOCKS GAME FARM 

P. O. Box No. 1011 Bridgeport, Conn. 



Yama Brook Trout 



Scientifically bred by the Darwinian 
theory for vigor, quick growing to large size 
and to produce a large number of eggs — 
absolutely free of disease, frequently thriv- 
ing where others die. 

Information in reference to trout breed- 
ing and keeping cheerfully given by our 
trout culturist. 

Scientific examination made of your con- 
ditions for keeping trout at moderate charge. 

We have on hand for stocking 1,500,000 
Yama Trout from fry to 2 lbs. Eggs in 
seaaon. 

YAMA FARMS 

Napanoch, Ulster County, N. Y 




WILD TURKEY EGGS 

$15.00 PER DOZEN UNTIL MAY 1st 
$12.00 PER DOZEN AFTER MAY 1st 

These eggs are from true Wild Turkeys. Orders filled in 
the order in which they are received. 

MARY C. WILKIE, Beaverdam, Virginia 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game,"* 



124 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



m 



-n 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 



R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



:u<'~ 



t%* 






m 



*«»1 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 



(Continued from page 121.) 

is needed in a shotshell load and to the indul- 
gence of manufacturers. Standardization, 
with reduction of the variety of loads to those 
of the best balance, will increase to a marked 
degree the general average of results ob- 
tained and conserve ammunition accordingly. 
In just the same, way, by following the rec- 
ommendations of this chart individual shooters 
will profit doubly. 

The new hanger will be displayed in the 
stores of all alert dealers in arms and am- 
munition, of which, by the way, there are over 
80,000 in this country. In addition, a few 
will find their way to the walls of club houses 
and the homes of individual shooters. That 
everyone of them will be highly valued and 
most carefully preserved is a foregone con- 
clusion. 



Rats. 

Some soldiers home on leave from the 
front were discussing the different things 
they had seen while in France, and among 
them were the number and size of the 
rats they had been troubled with. Said 
one: "Talk about rats! Why, I've seen 
some as big as sucking pigs." 

"That's nothing," spoke up another. 
"One night in my billet I woke up and 
there was one of them trying my coat 
on." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



125 



®WW$k 




WE HAVE 

For Sale 



Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tic, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. I. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 fornew Colortype Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



DOGS 



HOUXDS-ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky . 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 

offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 220a 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 

TWO YOUNG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 

sale. Dog and Bitch. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York- 3t 




H 

America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 



BOOK ON 

DOG DISEASES 
And How to Feed 

Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



FOR SALE-BREEDERS— SOEMMERINGS, MAN- 
churians, Swinhoes, Amhersts, Reeves, Mongolians. 
E. B. DRAKE, Ingram, Pa. 



RABBITS 



PAY BIG PROP ITS 

Raise Your Own Meat 



and Fur. The Pet Stock Journal, Box G, Lamoni, Iowa, 
will show you the best methods for pleasure or profit. 
Send 25c today for 8 months' trial subscription to 
America's leading rabbit and pet stock publication. 



Taking No Chances. 

At a dometic economy lesson in Chi- 
cago a young matron was asked by the 
lecturer to state briefly the best way 
to keep milk from souring. 

After some reflection the young wom- 
an replied: 

"Leave it in the cow." 



Not a Full School. 

Senator Kern got a letter from an 
old friend who has a little country place 
and wanted fish to put in a cute little 
pond. 

"Send me a school of bass," requested 
the friend. 

"I'm not sure about getting you an en- 
tire school," Kern wrote back, "but I'll 
try to send you a few grades." 



We cannot simply be destroyers of 
game for sport only and expect it to sur- 
vive as a food supply. We have been 
told that game no longer is needed as 
food ; that we have an abundance of beef, 
mutton, poultry, etc. This may have 
been true at one time but how about the 
present? The distinguished naturalist, 
Dr. Merriam, who once was the chief of 
the U. S. Biological Survey, has well 
said there are vast areas of wild land un- 
suitable for agriculture which easily 
might be made to produce a vast amount 
of game for food. 



There are hundreds of women in 
America who now make a living produc- 
ing game. They report the industry as 
interesting and profitable. Some of them 
may be heard on the stump if the game 
politician, who seeks to close the mar- 
kets to' their food, wishes to raise an 
issue. How will the farmers vote ? We 
know how the sportsmen who are worth 
while stand on the subject. 



126 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Breeders' Cards 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member cf the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
/ * Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
Member of the Game Guild. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $6.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 





DARK MALLARD 

Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids ^$&&M£g, 

These ducks are reared on free range sg||sgfS«~^^ 

especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. ~~T~ - "V-, 

They are strong on the wing. Big ""■gSMf" PSe ~ 

egg producers under control ■-,J"*»v'* 

Price $3.60 per pair ; $1.75 each ,- ; ."'">; -— 

ALBERT F. HOLMES ' r^-1. fT 'C'l 

8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. -■— . 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 



Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 




Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 




SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER 
Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, ' ' 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






§** 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sig^i your letters: "Yours for More Gam*.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



127 





GAME BIRDS 
All American game birds are fully 
described in the illustrated book, 
"Our Feathered Game, " written by 
the Editor of the Game Breeder 
Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 

REEVES and RINGNECK 

PHEASANTS. 

All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 

Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 
I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 

Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

We have Ringnecks and ten 
other species of Pheasants. 
Eggs in season. One day 
old pheasant chicks 65 
cents each. Flemish Giants 
and other rabbits. 

THE MAPLE GROVE PHEASANTRY AND 
STOCK FARM, 43ldenAve., Pelham Manor, 
Member of the Game Guild. 




PET 
N.Y. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



FOR SALE 
These Pheasants will be in full plumage this fall : 4 pair 
Silvers, $30 00 ; 2 extra hens, $10.00. 1 pair Swinhoes, 
$35 00. 1 pair Mongolian, $7-00; 3 extra cocks, S600- 
10 Ringneck hens. $30.00; 4 Ringneck cocks, $5.00 3 pair 
Lad \ Amhersts, $5000; 1 extra cock, $10 00. 1 pair Gold- 
ens, $8.00 ; 3 extra hens, $15.00 1 pair Reeves, $15 00 : 
2 extra hens, $20. 00. 5 pair Canaoa geese, 5 years old, 
$35.00. 6 pair Redheads, $50 00; 1 pair Baldpates, $5 00; 
1 pair Pintails, $3 00. 1 pair wood ducks, $12 50 ; 1 pair 
Mandarin ducks, $12 50. 1 pair Mexican tree ducks, $12.50. 
M. R. CHEESMAN, Murray, Utah, R F.D. No. 3. Box 61. 

FOR SALE— PET FEMALE COON. GUARANTEED 

breeder, three years old. Had five last litter. Stamp 

for reply. BEN BOWMAN, Monroe Ave., Canton, Ohio 

It 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12 

LIVE GAME 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — RINGNECK, GOLDEN PHEASANT- 
and silver. We are going to close out our pheasantry 
Prices reasonable. OCCONEECHEE FARM, Durham. 
N. C. 

FOR SALE-PHEASANTS, PURE BRED CHINESE 

Eggs, $3.50 per dozen, $25.00 per hundred. NINA 

ALMY, Middleburgh, N. Y. It 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices : Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wir g Teal, 
$3.75 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
■ Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (lot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue 
WM. J MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans. Wild Duoks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS. Chincoteague Island. Va. 



BELGIAN HARES AND FLEMISH GIANTS FOR 

sale. Al stock. C. W. DIXON, 8612 Morgan Street, 

Chicago, 111. i t 



WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO.. Mt Sterling. Ky. 



GAME E.GGS 



FOR SALE-PHEASANT EGGS FROM STRONG 
Healthy Stock, $3.00 a Dozen. LLRAY ORCHARD 
COMPANY, Luray, Virginia. 2t 

FOR SALE-ENGLISH PHEASANT EGGS $15 PER 
hundred. J. CONLON, East Islip, L. I. 

SILVER, GOLDEN, RINGNECK PHEASANTS 

Mallards. Prices reasonable. FRANK MINZEY* 

Lake George, New York. 2 { 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.* 



128 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to, an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FOR SALE-ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS 
eggs from unrelated stock. Birds kept in their wild 
state with unlimited range. Cultivated under the most 
healthful and normal conditions. Also pure wild mallard 
ducks' eggs from flight birds. TURTLE LAKE GAME 
FARM, Hillman, Michigan. it 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS — Many for sale by 

dozen or hundred. Ready now. Guarantee arrive O.K. 

MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Box 70 

Kansas. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE 

Chinese Ri< gneck pheasant eggs, $3.50 per do/en. 

Golden pheasant eggs 50c each. Mrs. EDGAR TILTON, 

Suffern. New York. 4t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck fcods, w ill grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 
An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lo's. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



■D/^/^\I^"0 Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

Ov/vyl\u Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St . N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



WISH CHANGE OF POSITION AS POULTRY 

man or gamekeeper by married man. No children. 

Life experience, four years at present position, excellent 

references. L. W. WER'lHEIM, Hillsboro, N. C. It 

GAMEKEEPER -POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 
gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionport, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A. S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPER— SITUATION WANTED 

American game breeder with a 15 year experience wishes 
to raise 5000 ringnecks for a private party or State, and 
having an incubator and brooder plant. Apply to THE 
GAME BREEDER, t 5 o Nassau St , New York. N. Y. 

HEAD KEEPER SCOTCH, WISHES A POSITION 
Small family, four years' good reference from present 
employer, good reason for leaving. Experienced on 
pheasants, quail, wild turkey and mallards. Ten years' 
references in this country. Apply J. C. E., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER.- SITUATION WANTED. — I can 

furnish flood English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper; can rear thousands of birds, and train 
dogs. &c. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to get a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address 3. H., care of The Game Breeder, ISO 
Nassau Street, New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

200 PHEASANTS WANTED -WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age ot birds. 
R. A. MAXWELL, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, I5.00APAIR. GOLDENS. 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED. EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS. 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH, ONAWA, 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 



Snake With Two Tails. 

Rocky Point, Ark., Oct. 6.— While W. M. 
Phillips was showing friends over his crop 
they discovered a chicken snake. They killed 
it and found the snake had a tail, at each end. 
The snake, which was about four feet long, 
had undertaken to swallow a snake of the 
coach whip variety, which was about five and 
one-half feet long. It had swallowed its full 
length of the snake. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G»me." 



Quail, Bob whites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to till the largest order* for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and 
other water fowl. 






all 



Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 



-AND- 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beat 
Royal Swans off England, I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have fiO acres 
af land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia 



Department V. 



WM J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY. 



BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




HIGH GUN 
IDEAL 
PREMIER 
TARGET 



R3 m M totl 

ARROW 
NITRO CLUB 



SELBY LOADS 
CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



(j ffiBLACK SHELLS 

^^ AJAX 

CIIMAX 



FIELD 

RECORD 



Winchester 

REPEATER 
LEADER 



Take Your Pick 

Select your favorite from any of these shells, but before 
you buy it be sure that it is loaded with a Hercules Smokeless 
Shotgun Powder, Infallible or "E. C. " 

It is not difficult to get shells loaded with these powders. 
Any one of the fourteen standard brands listed at the left is 
obtainable loaded with 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 



INFALLIBLE 



e.c: 



These powders have many friends among the veterans of the traps 
and fieid— men who know the value of powders that are dependable — 
powders that give high velocity with light recoil, that burn clean arid 
free and give even patterns. They know that Infallible and "E. C." 
have the uniformity of quality that helps to chalk up a hierh percentage 
at the traps and brings them home from a day in the field with light 
hearts and heavy game-bags. 

When you think of the shell you shoot, think of Hercules Smoke- 
less Shotgun Powders. 

When you buy shells, look at the end of the box for the names 
Infallible or "E. C." If you don't see them, ask for them and be 
sure that you get what you ask for. 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

77 W. 11th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 



O J f,ii>(p c l 




Single Copies 10' 

""""■"■» MHMiiiiiiiimniiimniiiiniimiiin. 



THE- 



VOL. XIII. 



AUGUST, 1918 




The- Object op this magazine- is 
to Make North America the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



THE GAME BREEDERS WON! 

A Common Sense Victory! 

President of U. S. Issues Proclamation for More Game and Game Breeding 



Migratory Bill which said you must- not! you must not! in tiresome 
phrases, changed just before it was enacted so as to say you may! Section 
12 at the end of the new Law tells the story: 



SECTION 12. NOTHING IN THIS ACT SHALL BE 
CONSTRUED TO PREVENT THE BREEDING OF 
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS ON FARMS AND PRE- 
SERVES AND THE SALE OF BIRDS SO BRED UN- 
DER PROPER REGULATIONS FOR THE PURPOSE 
OF INCREASING THE FOOD SUPPLY. 




Readers of The Game Breeder can point with pride to the above com- 
mon sense. We asked for this Amendment long ago and were told it 
could not be inserted. The Bill never could have passed without it in our 
opinion. "It went through as if greased for the occasion," as soon as 
Section 12 was added. Hereafter when the Wild Lifing Game Protection 
combination wants any restrictive legislation it would be wise to start the 
bill with a statement that nothing in it shall be construed to prevent food 
production or field sports in places where these seem desirable. Hundreds 
of new game laws will be proposed next winter, no doubt. Hundreds of 
thousands of dollars can be saved if the bills be made to start right as 
suggested. Often we have pointed out the necessiity for keeping the 
game laws off of the farms. The victory at Washington follows quickly 
our victory on Long Island, where the quails were saved for sport. 
Editor. 



President'* Proclamation Will Be Printed in Full in September Issue 



imnMHiiiMUiiUHiiHiiiimiininiiniiiiiimHiHiwHimiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiHmii.MiiHiitiiNiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

PUBLISHED BV 

THE GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW *MK CITT UiA f.S&B»jf*S 



G AN E BREEDER 



No. 5 




:~- 



I 

IN 

There is NO TRUTH in the rumor that has 
got about — perhaps intentionally circulated — that p 

we have discontinued to manufacture our well- 
known foods. 



J 



1 

1 



In spite of great difficulties we have been able 
fill about 96% of all our orders. 

We have conformed to Government require- 
ments so that we and our customers have helped 
to conserve the supply of food for human beings 
by making and using a special food for domestic 
animals. 

If your dealer cannot supply you with 

SPRATT'S 

DOG, POULTRY 1 GAME FOODS 



Write us direct for prices 
and other information. 



1 



I 

H 
H 



H 
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THE GAME BREEDER 



129 




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130 



THE GAME BREEDER 




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THE GAME BREEDER 



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THE GAME BREEDER 






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CONTENTS 

Survey of the Field. 

An Experiment with Gambel's Quail , 

A Beginner's Experience - 

The Duck Sickness in Utah 

The Game and the Farmer 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves 



D. W. Huntington 

Z. T. De Kalmar 

Alexander Wetmore 

Henry M. Brigham 

By Our Readers 



Editorials^The Hot Bird and the Cold Bottle— The Progress of Wild 

Lifing — Protection — The Wild Duck Sickness Why not Breed 

Quail and Grouse? 

Book Reviews — Outings and Innings — Trade Notes, Etc. 



THREE THOUSAND 

Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 

FALL DELIVERY 
Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July 9, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City. 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Office of Publication, New York, N. Y., - Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Year 
VOLUME XIII AUGUST 1918 NUMBER 5 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



"A Revival of Common Sense." 

A recent copy of the Migratory Bird 
Law contains a new section not in the 
bill as originally written. This will be 
quite interesting to game breeders and 
we are pleased to see that those hostile 
to their industry have not been permit- 
ted to prevent game breeding. Section 
12 is quite worth while : 

"Nothing in this Act shall be construed 
to prevent the breeding of migratory game 
birds on farms and preserves and the sale 
of birds so bred under proper regulations 
for the purpose of increasing the food 
supply." 

We are inclined to believe that this 
additional clause helped the passage of 
the enactment much. It certainly is 
quite modern and if the late dean of 
American sportsmen, Charles Hallock, 
was alive we should send a telegram 
of congratulation to him assuring him 
that his oft quoted statement, "truly we 
need a revolution of thought and -a re- 
vival of common sense," had evidently 
produced results. The old plank, "no 
sale of game," seems to have been busted 
and long may it remain so ! 

We are inclined to believe that readers 
of The Game Breeder, without going 
near the lobby, have accomplished some- 
thing quite worth while. 

An Official Bulletin. 

The Conservation Commission *of 
Maryland has issued an interesting bul- 
letin giving the laws and regulations re- 
lating to oysters, fish and game. 

The last oyster season was "the most 
unusual in the recollection of the pres- 



ent generation. It might be said to have 
been but half a season, inasmuch as the 
interruption by the freeze beginning with 
the 28th of December stopped almost 
completely for nearly two months all 
operations." 

The advantage to oystermen of hav- 
ing oysters planted on leased ground is 
set out at length. The fortunate oyster- 
man who had oysters bedded during the 
past season had the satisfaction of being 
able to occupy himself profitably with 
the taking up and marketing these 
oysters while many of his neighbors 
were compelled to sit by idly and forego 
the earnings which the thrifty planter 
was enjoying. 

The Game Breeder long ago referred 
to the fact that when there were no 
leased oyster beds and everyone took 
and sold oysters wherever he could find 
them, the oyster industry seemed likely 
to come to an end. The leasing of oyster 
beds and the planting of oysters by pri- 
vate industry soon resulted in the mar- 
kets being full of oysters. Maryland 
should encourage the planting and har- 
vesting of a game crop on private lands. 
Easily the markets could be kept full of 
game. 

Written Permission to Shoot. 

Section 67 of the Maryland law pro- 
vides that shooters must procure a li- 
cense and also the written permission 
from the property owner or tenant on 
whose property said persons may be 
hunting. 

Since the Department of Agriculture 
and various associations concerned about 



134 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the saving of the game by new and re- 
vised game laws are continually pointing 
out the fact that quail and other upland 
game birds are valuable as insect and 
weed seed destroyers, it would seem likely 
that more and more farmers in Maryland, 
as elsewhere, will refuse to permit shoot- 
ing, and if the shooters continue to shoot 
up the farms and run away when anyone 
appears to see if they have the written 
permission, the next move, no doubt, will 
be to place the quail and the grouse on 
the song bird list. The State can prevent 
this disaster when it encourages some of 
those who own the shooting lands to 
produce game for profit and to lease the 
shooting to sporting syndicates, which 
should pay the farmers' taxes. This 
plan has been found to work out far bet- 
ter for all hands than the prohibition of 
shooting does. 

The Vicious Moiety System. 

Section 46 of the Maryland law con- 
tains a vicious moiety or grafting clause. 
Local game wardens may be appointed 
in any section or county of the State 
who "shall not receive a salary, but shall 
receive as their compensation one-half 
of all fines derived from the prosecution 
of violators of the game and fish laws 
arrested by them.'' 

Rights of Owners, Children and 
Tenants. 

Section 69 of the Maryland law pro- 
vides that owners of farm lands, their 
children or tenants or children of such 
tenants shall without procuring a license 
' have the right to hunt, pursue and kill 
game during the open season' for the 
same on the said farm lands of which he 
or they are the bona fide owners, chil- 
dren of such owners or tenants, or chil- 
dren of such tenants. 

It would seem that there should be 
no possible objection to permitting such 
owners, tenants and children from pro- 
ducing a good lot of game on such lands 
and no one could be harmed by such 
industry because the farmers have the 
right to require shooters to secure writ- 
ten permission to invade the farms, and 



they must know that shooting in places 
where no game breeding is carried on 
results in a loss of the weed and insect 
destroyers. 

The influence of the farmers is evi- 
dent in the new statute and we are in- 
clined to think they can have about what 
they want in Maryland, as elsewhere. 
When they decide that it should not be 
criminal to produce desirable foods on 
the farm, just as it is not criminal to 
produce oysters in leased beds, we feel 
sure the legislators will agree with them 
and that any members of the assembly 
who do not will quickly return to pri- 
vate life. Game as a farm asset quickly 
can be made abundant and profitable. 
Game as a matter of game politics with 
shooters shooting all they can find and 
wardens chasing them when they run 
away, and making numerous arrests for 
trivial offenses in order to secure half of 
the fines, will never result in most of 
the people who are said to own the game 
having any game to eat. 

Game Ownership. 

It is absurd to say that when a man 
purchases quail in Mexico, pays for their 
transportation to his farm, applies the- 
needed industry to keep down the vermin 
and provides food and protection for 
the birds, that the birds so purchased 
and the young reared under such con- 
ditions belong to the State or to the 
people in common or to the game poli- 
ticians. Where game wardens find such 
game in the possession of the importers 
and producers and arrest them in order 
to secure one-half of a fine, they may 
get away with it in some States, but 
the times are changing and the arrest and 
trial of a few food producing farmers 
will expedite the change much. The 
Game Breeder is a good place to adver- 
tise such performances. Xo charge is 
made for a single insertion. 

Game as Food. 

It is highly important to the many 
thousands of game farmers in America 
that they should have customers for their 
Sfame and e°s:s. The best customers are 
the shooting clubs and owners of coun- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



135 



try places who believe in producing a 
big lot of game before they shoot it. No 
one cares to shoot a big lot of game dur- 
ing the season and to let it lie on the 
ground and rot. Comparatively few can 
afford to produce a thousand or more 
bird- and give them all away. They 
hardly can be expected to continue to 
purchase eggs and stock birds from the 
game farmers if they know they will be 
hounded by game wardens in pursuit of 
half of the fines they may secure because 
the producers shoot more than three cock 
birds in a season or some other fool num- 
ber of birds. 

The Worst Vermin. 

A Western farmer, in a State which 
ha- a very bad game department, writes 
that the worst vermin they have to con- 
tend with is the game politician. It 
would seem time for the last named to 
study a little statesmanship. Xo states- 
man would insist that it should be a crime 
to profitably produce game on a farm. 
Possibly some politicians may be asked 
some questions in the agricultural states 
just before the next election. Any 
Grange easily can inquire how a candi- 
date stands on this food-producing 
matter. 

Good Work in New Mexico. 

The Hon. Theodore Roualt, Jr., game 
warden of Xew Mexico, one of the best 
State game officers in the country, 
writes : "During the past spring we have 
succeeded in distributing quite a num- 
ber of ringnecked pheasants among the 
farmers in the different parts of the 
state, and we believe that we will even- 
tually be able to secure enough pheas- 
ants from these small breeders to prop- 
erly stock the whole State. Our plan 
has been to supply the birds to the 
farmers at no expense whatsoever to 
them, excepting the erection of proper 
breeding plants, and then they are to sell 
us the birds at two months old at the 
prevailing market price. Under this plan 
we have been successful in inducing 
quite a number of farmers to take ad- 
vantage of it and I believe that in this 
way we will be successful in inducing 



them to take up the handling of other 
kinds of game birds.'' 

Xew Mexico quickly should become a 
big game producing State. The prairie 
grouse and several species of quail are 
indigenous and fairly abundant in many 
parts of the State and we have no doubt 
if some of the big farms and ranches 
will breed these birds for sale the owners 
will make a lot of money and perform 
an excellent public service. The sports- 
men who wish to have good bird shoot- 
ing during long open seasons can per- 
petuate sports for themselves by form- 
ing shooting clubs or syndicates to share 
the expense of properly looking after the 
game and they will provide sport for all 
hands just as the clubs on Long Island, 
X. Y., do, since much game overflows 
from club grounds and stocks the sur- 
rounding country. It never has been 
necessary to close quail shooting on Long 
Island, although it is quite near the big 
city of Xew York, which contains one- 
twentieth of the entire population of the 
United States. 

Meeting of Game and Fish Commis- 
sioners. 

The next annual meeting of the Inter- 
national Association of Game and Fish 
Commissioners will be held in Xew York 
City on Thursday and Friday, Septem- 
ber 12, and 13, 1918, following the an- 
nual meeting of the American Fisheries 
Society, at the same place. 

At the last annual meeting held in St. 
Paul, Minn., in August, 1917, the scope 
of this association was enlarged to cover 
all of Xorth America, by changing the 
name and by-laws of the organization so 
that the Dominion of Canada and the 
Canadian Provinces have an equal stand- 
ing in the association with the United 
States Government and the States of the 
Union. 

Membership in the association is com- 
posed of officials engaged in game and 
fish conservation work and its meetings 
and conferences are held annually. 

In view of the great importance of 
conservation work as affecting the food 
supply, the coming meeting is of special 
import at this time. Plans are being 



136 



THE GAME BREEDER 



made for a very interesting program and 
the committee on local arrangements, of 
which John B. Burnham, New York 
City, is chairman, is arranging for an 
attractive program of entertainment. 

It is expected that the attendance of 
officials from all parts of the United 
States and Canada will he much more 
general than ever before. 

The Food Supply, Section 12. 

The migratory bill seemed to be in- 
tended to put an end to the production 
of American wild fowl for food. We 
have engaged those behind the matter in 
many legal battles for the right and in 
every case they stood strong for the 
wrong — the Lupton bill in New York in- 
tended to permit and encourage game 
breeding was defeated by those who 
sought to make it criminal to have a 
migratory bird in possession or to ship 
or sell the desirable food. The same 
worthies appeared in opposition to later 
game breeders' bills and even succeeded 
in forcing a ridiculous compromise at 
Albany when permission was secured to 
produce foreign pheasants and the two 
wild fowl which least needed the breed- 
ers' protection to save them from ex- 
termination. Our splendid quail and 
grouse and other highly desirable wild 
food birds were eliminated 'from the pro- 
posed "revival of common sense" and it 
remained criminal, against our protest, 
to give these birds any practical or profit- 
able help. 

Later activities by the chief wild lifer 
and those who ran in his train were in- 
tended to put some of our best wild 
food birds on the song bird list and re- 
sulted in removing all practical and pro- 
fitable protection from the birds. Those 
who wished to keep alive in America 
shooting other than trap shooting viewed 
with alarm the migratory bill permitting 
those whose records were against game 
breeding to make criminal laws on this 
subject as often as a new idea should 
occur to them. The game breeders' ideas 
of law and natural history and, in fact, 
of common sense, as the dean put it, 
were so at variance with the ideas of 
those who, using vast sums of money, 
were behind the criminal absurdity, that 
we viewed with alarm the situation 



which would have been created by the 
passage of the bill as it was originally 
written, and had it not been repaired. The 
new section 12 providing that "Nothing 
in this act shall be construed to prevent 
breeding of migratory game birds on 
farms and preserves and the sale of birds 
so bred under proper regulation for the 
purpose of increasing the food supply," 
was a very happy afterthought which 
came none too soon and which undoubt- 
edly was brought about by readers of 
The Game Breeder. Early in the game 
when we asked one of those who engi- 
neered the bill to have an amentment 
similar to section 12 we were informed 
that such a repair would be impossible. 
The intimation was that this decision 
came from headquarters and was final. 
Congress did well to put a little common 
sense in the measure at the eleventh 
hour. 

It seems a great pity that the late dean 
of American sportsmen could not have 
lived to see the finishing touches put on 
to the "revival of common sense" which 
the dean said was highly necessary and 
important for the perpetuation of field 
sports. The Congress did it. 



BOUNTIES ON COYOTES. 

Davenport, Wash., June 15. — J. F. 
Hill, Deputy Auditor, took in twenty- 
five coyotes for bounty in one morning, 
of which number six were live puppies a 
few days old. Nineteen coyotes were 
brought in by J. W. Robinson of Edwall, 
who dug the young from holes in the 
fields. The county is paying a bounty of 
$1.50 each in addition to the State bounty 
of $1, and the two fees are resulting in 
destruction of the pests by farmers and 
sportsmen. 

♦■ — 

cAt on city pay roll. 
Newton, Mass., June 15. — Tim, au- 
thorized municipal cat on the- city's pay 
roll, probably is the only cat in the coun- 
try with such a distinction. His salary 
is' $29.20 a year, and no public official 
ever fulfilled his office duties more effi- 
ciently. His title on the books is "official 
rat and mouse catcher." A special ap- 
propriation of 8 cents a day is made for 
his services. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



137 



AN EXPERIMENT WITH GAMBEL'S QUAIL. 

By D. W. Huntington. 



An interesting experiment is being 
made this year at the Long Island Game 
Breeders' Association farms with Gam- 
bel's quail or partridges. We have long 
believed that attempts to introduce any 
species in a new region where it never 
occurred would not succeed when only 
a few pair of birds were used in the ex- 
periment. Darwin says if only a few 
stalks of wheat be grown in a garden 
the birds will get all the seed. There 
will be none for reproduction. We have 
observed the attempts made by State of- 
ficers to introduce and liberate pheasants 
in Kansas and gray partridges in Con- 
necticut and also the similar experiments 
made in other States which were total or 
nearly total failures. Although many 
thousands of dollars were expended in 
the two States named and thousands of 
birds were liberated, the results were bad 
failures. One Connecticut warden who 
was distributing birds reported that upon 
looking back, after he had liberated a 
pair of gray partridges in a field, he saw 
a hawk take one of them. There were 
many similar disasters, no doubt, to the 
new birds in a strange country full of 
vermin. They came from places where 
the keepers make the fields safe and they 
were not prepared to be on the lookout 
for numerous species of vermin besides 
the hawks. 

Our theory is that good numbers o>f 
birds should be liberated on compara- 
tively small areas ; that such areas should 
have an abundance of food and that 
water should be provided in places with- 
out ponds or 'streams. There should be 
also an abundance of good cover, many 
briars- at the borders of and in the fields 
where the foods are planted. Before we 
have completed the experiments with the 
Gambel's quail, prairie grouse and other 
American game birds, we hope to have 
the fields prepared with numerous suit- 
able briar patches, such as each species 
prefers and to have the briar patches 



connected with briar avenues so the birds 
can always find safe places when going 
to feed. 

Thus far our experiment with Gam- 
bel's quail indicates that they lay more 
eggs when confined in pens than they 
lay in a wild State, the eggs, of course, 
being gathered from the penned birds. 
A number of birds confined together in 
one pen did not average as many eggs as 
were laid by one hen confined with one 
cock in a similar pen. The last named 
bird had laid 21 eggs and apparently was 
not through laying when I saw her a few 
days ago. Although as many eggs as 
are usually laid by this quail were left in 
the nest for several days to see if she 
would become broody, she kept on laying 
an egg every day. This pair of birds 
was selected at random from the lot in 
the other pen and the hirds were mated 
arbitrarily, of course. 

The food given consisted of small 
grain and seeds and a lot of grass and 
clover plucked and thrown in the pen 
daily. Fresh water was always given 
daily. Since complaints have been made 
in New Mexico that the Gambel's quail 
eat the beans we shall plant beans for 
the birds next year. 

Eggs placed under heavy hens were 
broken to a large extent and the bantams 
on the place refused to get broody at the 
right time. ' Some eggs will be hatched, 
no doubt, under the hens and we hope to 
hatch many more in an incubator. Some 
of the newly hatched birds will be of- 
fered to old quail to see if they will 
adopt them. Both Gambels and the Bob 
Whites will have families of young pre- 
sented to thelm if they will take them 
and look after them. I have hopes. of 
inducing a cock Bob White to adopt and 
rear a flock of Gambel's quail in a wild 
State, and if he does I can see no reason 
why he should not impart to his brood 
good sporting manners. 

The Gambel's quail is a noted sprinter, 



138 



THE GAME BREEDER 



worse than the fastest pheasant before 
dogs, and on this account the handsome 
Gambels are not considered nearly so de- 
sirable for sport as the Bob Whites are. 

Elliot's descriptions of the behavior of 
this quail is not overdrawn. He says : 
''From my experience, however, in hunt- 
ing them, I should say if they had any 
choice of locality it lay between dense 
clumps, matted with vines and bristling 
thorns, into and through which nothing 
living could penetrate save themselves, 
or mountainsides that ascend in a direct 
line and which are covered with jagged 
stones and slippery boulders, over which 
the light-footed birds pass without effort, 
stopping occasionally to look down and 
jeer at the struggling, panting mortal be- 
low who is striving to conquer the 
ascent, and when the pursuer had arrived 
at the summit, the quail, it would be dis- 
covered, had run to the edge of another 
canyon, into which they flew at the first 
appearance of the sportsman, and began 
the ascent from below on the opposite 
side, leaving the hunter gazing at them 
across the great gulf that rolled between. 
If there is another species of game bird 
more tantalizing and vexatious in its 
manners, and more utterly lost to all the 
finer feelings that should compel it to 
comform to the recognized rules that 
govern field sports, I happily do not 
know of it, and have no wish to meet 
with it, if existing." 

It is quite evident that the Gambel's 
quail need some training before they will 
lie well to dogs and if the bob whites can 
be induced to adopt them and rear the 
young they may "learn to conform to the 
recognized rules governing sport.'' 

Of course a surer way of performing 
this experiment would be to place the 
Gambel's eggs under bob white hens and 
let them hatch the eggs and rear the 
young in protected gardens, made safe 
and attractive. Unfortunately, however, 
we had a large number of cock bob whites 
this year and only one hen. This hen 
had been mated with a cock last year and 
we let her have the same mate this sea- 
son. After filling her nest with eggs the 
hen suddenly died, but the cock at once 
took her place on the nest and I saw him 



daily, when I visited him, sitting as 
nicely as the best quail hen ever did. 
He no doubt will hatch and rear a fine 
brood. 

Next in importance to improving the 
sporting manners of the Gambels is the 
question of their settling down and 
adopting a new home entirely different 
in its vegetation and appearance from 
the native habitat of the birds. Since the 
old birds seem to thrive on the foods pro- 
vided for them and they no doubt will 
find many more insects and seeds when 
liberated than they have in the pens, it 
would seem that the food question will 
not stand in the way of introducing and 
establishing the birds on Long Island, N. 
Y. The question of the exterminating 
effect of professional wild lifers was set- 
tled, we hope forever, when the notable 
"hearing" was pulled off before New 
York's intelligent State official who re- 
fused to close Long Island to the quail 
producers. There are other game ene- 
mies, however, which will require atten- 
tion : The house cat, the fox, the hawks, 
owls, snakes, skunks and many others are 
known to occur on the ground used for 
the experiment, but there are two ways 
of fencing- against these and making the 
ground safe for the Gambels. The birds, 
as Dr. Elliot has indicated, know a good 
briar patch when they see one. Long 
Island produces a cat briar that in our 
opinion is as vermin proof as any New 
Mexico or Arizona jungle. A patch of 
these briars bordered with blackberry 
and wild rose should make as safe a 
retreat as any Gambel's quail would ask 
for if it could make its cover wants 
known. Traps and the gun already have 
accounted for some house cats, skunks, 
crows and other enemies. 

The birds are known to be abundant 
near water holes and streams and evi- 
dently they need water. They also re- 
quire dusting places which easily are 
made and grit. If when supplied with 
an abundance of suitable Cover, food, 
water, grit and dusting places, a good 
number of Gambel's quail turned down 
in company do not thrive we shall be 
inclined to think they are hard to please 
and that possibly there is something 



THE GAME BREEDER 



139 



lacking in soil or climate. As to climate 
the birds are known to stand any amount 
of heat provided they can find shade .and 
they are said to thrive in mountainous 
regions where the snow lies on the 
ground. It certainly is interesting work 
to endeavor to introduce a new species 
and the work in hand has an additional 



interest since it seems necessary to 
change the sporting demeanor of the 
quail. 

P. S. — I hope readers who are experi- 
menting with the California quail and 
others in the Eastern States will write 
their experiences for The Game Breeder. 



A BEGINNER'S EXPERIENCE. 



Z. T. De Kalmar. 



You seem to encourage contributions 
by small breeders and beginners to such 
an extent that I feel inclined to send in 
my mite to the Exchange of The Game 
Breeder. 

I had several clutches of mallard and 
black duck eggs to hatch, three of which 
appear to be rather characteristic with 
beginners, and I will therefore give the 
data in regards to these three hatches. 

The first one was a setting of thirteen 
mallard eggs that were kept three weeks 
before setting, being transhipped in the 
meantime three times. The eggs were 
set under a buff rock hen and hatched out 
on the twenty-fifth day 13 ducklings out 
of 13 eggs. 

The second clutch was sixteen black 
duck eggs, received from the West, and 
set under two hens five days after arri- 
val. This was a very peculiar and signal 
failure. One of the hens proved to be a 
cannibal pure and simple, and ate seven 
of the eight eggs put under her. The 
other hen broke and spoiled seven 
others, until I was only able to save one 
egg, and that one I brought out in the 
incubator. 

The third one was a clutch of 100 
mallard eggs of which 96 went into an 
incubator, four of them having arrived 
broken. The incubator was an "iron- 
clad'' of medium size, which was started 
at 101 degrees and which I found very 
satisfactory under the adverse weather 
conditions of an unseasonable summer 
A fair-sized flat iron pan filled with sand 



and water was placed under the eggs, 
which was refilled every third day. The 
eggs were turned at the end of 48 hours 
the first time, after which they were 
turned twice daily and cooled once, at 
night. On the fourth day I sprinkled the 
eggs with tepid water with the help of 
an atomizer which I found very handy 
for that purpose. Thereafter the eggs 
were sprinkled at regular intervals of 
four days at the night turning, and after 
the cooling, just before being put back 
into incubator. The temperature was 
raised to 102 degrees on the fourteenth 
day and kept there until the twenty-first 
day, at the same time increasing the 
cooling time from 5 to 10 minutes, ac- 
cording to atmospheric conditions, dur- 
ing the first two weeks, to 15 minutes 
daily during the third week. Entering 
the last week of incubation the temper- 
ature was raised to 103 degrees, cooling 
time increased gradually to thirty min- 
utes and the eggs sprinkled dailv with 
tepid water. Pipping started at noon of 
the twenty-sixth day, after a final test- 
ing showed a fertility of 67 eggs out of 
the 96 on the nineteenth day. Out of 
these 67 fertile eggs I hatched 53 duck- 
lings at the end of the twenty-ninth day. 
Two of the ducklings were unfit to sur- 
vive and died shortly after ; one a crip- 
ple of both legs, the other affected by 
some sort of epileptic disease that caused 
it to throw somersaults. 

The first feed given was grit (oyster 
shells') and hardboiled egg at the end of 



140 



THE GAME BREEDER 



from 48 to 72 hours after birth, which 
they at once began to shovel down and 
they are thriving nicely ever since, the 
only casualties being four ducklings lost 
during the cold spell of two weeks ago, 
when the temperature went down to 
freezing point on several nights and 
some of them strayed out from under 
the cover of the brooder during the 
night. Oatmeal was added to their fare 
on the second day, chick grain three days 
later, duck meal and crissell on the tenth 
day, and at present, being two weeks old, 
thev are fed well-scalded duck meal and 
crissell four times per day with plenty 



of charcoal and grit, also an occasional 
feed of lettuce, etc. 

I shall not jump to conclusions, but 
still, I think, that June eggs show a very 
marked decrease of fertility as against 
that of the early May eggs, as shown by 
my 100% hatch mallards, not to mention 
three other settings that gave me an aver- 
age of 89.7% ; all May eggs. 

For future references I am keeping a 
complete record of all hatches which, I 
think, will be of great help next year, 
when I shall (?) count my ducks by the 
hundreds. 

"Yours for more game." 



THE DUCK SICKNESS IN UTAH. 

Abstract from a Bulletin of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
By Alexander Wetmore. 



Bulletin Xo. 672, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, gives a full account of 
the disease of wild ducks in Utah since 
1910, during which period there were 
large losses of many species of wild fowl. 
The writer describes the symptoms, the 
area where sick birds were found, the 
species affected, the cause of the sickness, 
remedial measures and the care of sick 
birds. 

Thousands of wild fowl find suitable 
breeding grounds in the marshes formed 
in the deltas of the rivers draining into 
Great Salt Lake, and the abundant food 
supply attracts vast hordes of others that 
pass during their migration in spring 
and fall. Local interest was greatly 
aroused and many attempts at investiga- 
tion were made. 

Many thousands of ducks died on both 
the Jordan and the Webers rivers, while 
on the great mud flats in the Bear river 
delta, the mortality is said to have been 
almost beyond belief. Dead birds rolling 
in the sun dotted the water on the shal- 
low bays, and long windows of bodies 
were blown upon the shore lines and 
against the rushes. The birds died in 
such great numbers, and the causes of 
the mortality were so obscure, that a 



strong prejudice arose against killing and 
taking ducks that were apparently 
healthy. The gun clubs in the Bear river 
area were not opened that year (1910) 
and few ducks were killed elsewhere. In 
1912 on both the Weber and Bear river 
marshes conditions were bad and at- 
tempts were made to clear the marshes 
of dead ducks. . W. O. Belnap states 
that about 30,000 were picked up on the 
Weber river flats, while on Bear river, 
from records kept by V. F. Davis, it is 
learned that the bodies of 44,462 wild 
ducks were gathered and burned between 
August 22 and September 21. 

The symptoms of the duck sickness 
indicate a paralysis of the nerve centers 
controlling the muscular system. Birds 
affected may be able to support them- 
selves in the air for short distances only, 
or may have the wings entirely helpless. 
The symptoms are described at length 
and the bulletin is illustrated with photo- 
graphs of a sick pintail, cinnamon teal, 
a mallard, a green-winged teal and a 
row of experiment pens on Bear river. 

It has been established definitely that 
the cluck sickness in Utah is caused by 
the toxic action of certain soluble salts 
found in alkali, as that term is used in 



THE GAME BREEDER 



141 



the West. By actual experiment it has 
been found that the duck sickness may 
be caused by the chlorides of calcium 
and magnesium. Experiments have in- 
dicated that other salts may be incrim- 
inated in Utah and elsewhere, but this 
statement is made with reserve, as it has 
not yet been definitely established. 

The Salt Lake Valley is well culti- 
vated and owes its fertility almost en- 
tirely to irrigation. The irrigation has 
decreased the amount of water supply- 
ing the marshes and the resulting slow 
drainages induces stagnation over large 
areas. Surface evaporation and capil- 
lary attraction rapidly draw the salts held 
in solution in the mud to the surface and 
there concentrate them. 

Fresh water is the only agency that 
has been found of value in combatting 
the duck sickness. Birds slightly af- 
fected, and even many entirely helpless, 
recover in almost all cases when given 
plenty of moderately fresh water to 
drink. With an abundance of good 
water in the marshes sick ducks are in- 
frequent, as when the bays are well filled 
and well drained many birds that become 
affected recover in a few days. 

For remedial agencies, therefore, 
measures must be adopted that tend to 
supply fresh water or to drive ducks out 
from areas where they are liable to ob- 
tain alkalis in harmful quantity. Three 
methods of treatment that promise suc- 
cess in dealing with the trouble are : ( 1) 
Increasing summer water in streams ; 
(2) draining affected areas, and (3) 
collecting sick birds for treatment. 

Since more water is constantly needed 
for irrigation, the first method is said 
to be impractical. The drainage of the 
areas where the birds may become poi- 
soned can be done with little effort and 
in this way it is said opportunity for in- 
fection may be removed. In the marshes 
controlled by the New State Gun Club 
this means of meeting the situation is 
particularly applicable. 

Serious objection has been offered to 
this plan on the ground that it kills off 
the duck foods in the marsh and that 
shooting in the fall is poor in conse- 
quence. 

Birds with the duck sickness recover 



in a short time (unless too far gone) 
when placed on water that is moderately 
fresh. A large number of ducks were 
cured by this means at the field labor- 
atory on Bear river, and it has been 
proved that recovery is permanent. In 
past years men have been employed to 
gather and bury the dead birds on the 
marshes. If they were set< to work 
gathering the sick birds and bringing 
them in, a large number of ducks could 
be saved at comparatively small expense- 
In the course of the investigation, 
1,211 individuals belonging to the seven 
species of ducks most severely affected 
were treated in this manner. Of these 
284 died and 927 recovered. Among 
the ducks treated were a large number 
of very weak birds that were so far 
along that ordinarily they would have- 
been disregarded. Eliminating these, the 
ratio of recovery was about 90 per cent 
of those brought in. 

Among mallards and pintails many in- 
dividuals are killed by lead poison due to 
eating shot. These have been eliminated 
from the table showing the number 
treated and the percentage of each spe- 
cies which recovered. 



Release of Banded Birds. 

Aluminum bands were placed on the 
legs of about 1,000 ducks that were cured 
and released at the mouth of Bear river. 
From these banded birds data have been 
obtained upon the permanency of the 
cure and the subsequent longevity of in- 
dividuals that have recovered. The 
bands used thus are of two types : 
Each bears a number stamped upon one 
side ; on the reverse, one is marked, 
"Notify U. S. Dept. Agr., Wash., D. C. ;" 
the other, "Notify Biological Survey, 
Washington, D. C." These bands are 
light and in addition are little affected by 
salt or alkaline waters. Returns have 
come in at the present time from about 
170 of these ducks. Many of these were 
killed locally, but nearly always under 
circumstances that indicated that they 
had fully recovered. Others have come 
from greater distances. Individual rec- 
ords range west to the Pacific Ocean in 
California, south to the Mexican border 



112 



THE GAME BREEDER 



in New Mexico, east to Joplin, Mo., and 
north into southern Saskatchewan in 
Canada. Three birds banded in 1914 
were killed by hunters during 1916, and 
another released at the same time was 
reported in 1917, so that there can be 
no doubt that the birds treated recovered 
fully. 

Valuable information has been ob- 



tained from reports on these banded 
ducks as to the lines of flight pursued 
by waterfowl during their migrations. 
This is of the greatest importance, and 
it is desired that sportsmen or others who 
chance to kill these banded birds send 
immediately full details to the Biological 
Survey as to the number of the band, 
together with date and place of capture. 



THE GAME AND THE FARMER. 



Henry M. Brigham. 



The Game Breeder is right. Game, 
excepting only migratory birds, must 
have a profitable market value if it is 
ever again to be plentiful. The farmer 
alone can produce it and by no other 
argument can he be persuaded. A profit- 
able market only will not suffice, how- 
ever. His right to the game which he 
has produced must be protected just as 
fully as is his right to his chickens, 
ducks, turkeys and other domestic ani- 
mals. If grouse, quail and pheasants are 
to be plentiful, the farmer must provide 
suitable covers, supply food when 
needed and keep down the vermin. This 
involves labor and expense which he 
will not undertake unless he knows that 
the birds he has raised are just as much 
his property as his chickens, ducks and 
turkeys and that when he has produced 
them he can sell them in the market at 



a profit. There is no thickly populated 
country in the world where game is 
plentiful, except where the ownership of 
the land owner in the game upon his 
lands is fully recognized and the game 
has a market value. The existing laws 
which prohibit poaching on posted 
land are wholly inadequate to meet the 
situation. No one should be permitted 
to shoot the farmer's game without his 
permission and adequate penalty should 
be provided which would fully protect 
him. If such laws were enforced there 
would be game a'plenty for everyone in 
a few years. The farmer would be 
benefited and so would the sportsman 
as shooting ri°fhts could be obtained at 
small cost. Why not go to the root of 
the matter and pass laws that would 
stimulate production rather than restric- 
tive laws which discourage it? 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Deer Breeding Booming. 

We were desirous of procuring 
or two carloads of deer recently 
wrote to our advertisers whom 
thought could furnish them. Since none 
could furnish any good number of deer 
for immediate delivery we extended our 
inquiry to a large number of deer breed- 



one 

and 

we 



ers who are members of the society but 
who do not advertise, probably because 
they do not wish to answer a large mail 
and can sell all their deer without adver- 



tising. 



One member wrote that he had just 
sold three or four hundred deer, all that 
he wished to part with, but that he could 



THE GAME BREEDER 



143 



fill the order next year. Others reported 
good sales but said they could procure 
the deer later or would have them for 
sale next year. 

The Biological Survey reported that 
they had not kept up a list of deer breed- 
ers and could not suggest any one who 
could fill our order. 

We are glad to know that the deer 
breeding industry is booming and that 
the breeders have demands for all the 
deer they produce. There is much land 
suitable for deer farming that can be 
made profitable and we hope the number 
of deer farms quickly will be increased 
so that all who want deer for sport or 
for profit can procure breeding stock. 
Much venison is now sold in the markets 
in States which have intelligent game 
officers and the markets everywhere 
should be full of this desirable food dur- 
ing long open seasons. 

We shall be obliged to all those who 
have deer if they will send a letter stat- 
ing how many they have. Our card 
indexes of big game breeders are not as 
complete as we wish to have them. 
Among the thousands of breeders who 
own game and who read The Game 
Breeder there undoubtedly are some who 
have deer who are not listed as big game 
breeders. 

Scarcity of Grasshoppers. 

Several game farmers report a scarcity 
of grasshoppers this season. On places 
where large numbers of game birds are 
produced year after year it seems natural 
that grasshoppers and all insects eaten by 
game birds should become scarce. It is 
desirable to rear in new fields the second 
or third season, where the place is a large 
one, and a return can be made to the old 
fields after the insects have increased in 
numbers. 

Those who say shooting should be 
prohibited for terms of years or for ever 
because game birds eat insects should 
visit" some of the places where shooting 
is lively during long open seasons and 
where the game remains so plentiful that 
often there are not enough insects to go 
round. 

Why enact laws preventing an industry 



which produces the results desired ? The 
game birds are too scarce in places where 
shooting is prohibited to have any appre- 
ciable effect on the insects. 

High Prices. 

The high prices for all foods have had 
a tendency to send up the prices of 
live game for breeding purposes. Pres- 
ent indications are that live pheasants, 
wild ducks, quail, grouse and all the other 
game birds will bring much higher prices 
this year and, as the breeding season ap- 
proaches, next year, than ever before. 
The prices of game in the hotels and res- 
taurants last year w r ere high but what 
they will be next fall and winter we 
would hardly like to predict. They surely 
will be well up. 

One reason for the high prices is that 
many members of the Game Conserva- 
tion Society have entered the service 
and will not breed any game for sport 
this year. Some of the places are kept 
running in order to provide work for the 
keepers, some report that they only sell 
eggs and will not rear any birds until 
after the war. Many who have been re- 
jected for military duty regard game 
breeding and the sale of the highly de- 
sirable food as a patriotic duty and quite 
as important as fish breeding and war 
gardens are at this time. 

The Long Island Game Breeding As- 
sociation and the experiment stations of 
the Game Conservation Society will pro- 
duce some game, as much as possible 
considering the late starts which were 
made and the difficulty of getting prairie 
grouse and eggs for two of the places 
where experimental work is carried on. 
The scarcity of deer is referred to else- 
where. We found it impossible to get 
one or two carloads from any of the 
deer farms. 

After the War. 

It is quite evident that when the war 
is ended game breeding in America will 
have a boom. In all probability the big 
game farms which have been started in 
the Far West will (as one of their own- 
ers wrote to The Game Breeder) make 
it no longer necessary to purchase pheas- 



144 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ants abroad. Since it seems likely for a 
few years at least that the foreign coun- 
tries may not have much game to sell we 
predict that the American game farms 
which increase their capacity as some are 
doing will make a big lot of money. 
Those who add grouse and quail to their 
breeding stock will find that these birds 
are far more profitable than the pheas- 
ants and the ducks are. 

Although the prices will be so high 
next fall as tp invite breeders to sell their 
stock down to small numbers left for 
breeding purposes, we believe those who 
are wise will first set aside twice as many 
birds as they ever did before for breed- 
ing purposes and to look forward to a 
small fortune as the sure reward. 

Some people seemed to think, a year 
or two ago, that the game breeding busi- 
ness might be overdone and that prices 
would fall on this account. We believed 
that the more people who got into the 
industry the higher the prices would be 
for many years to come and our predic- 
tion was verified before the war sent the 
prices soaring. 



An Elaborate Game Bird Catalogue 

Chiles & Company, Mt. Sterling, Ky., 
have issued an attractive illustrated Mat- 
ing List and Catalogue. The writer of 
the catalogue (evidently Mr. Chiles) 
must have had a modest spell on when he 
gave his clever little book its title. It is 
far more than a "Mating and Price 
List ;" in fact it is full of valuable in- 
formation and hints to game breeders. 
We feel much like quoting a good part 
of the book for the information of our 
readers. This would hardly do since the 
preparation and printing of the book 
evidently cost a lot of money and it is 
sold for $1.00. We have no doubt all 
of our readers will be pleased with Mr. 
Chiles' book. 

There are long descriptions of the 
pheasants, rare and common, with nu- 
merous color pictures of the birds. The 
advice about the Reves pheasant (which 
the writer says are his< favorites among 
the game birds) is sound and timely. 
"We especially advise all clubs situated 
in mountainous sections to use these 



birds for breeding purposes instead of 
ringnecks or Mongolians." 

There are notes about how to make 
nests for wild geese ; how to feed and 
look after the various species of game 
birds ; often the feeding formulas of sev- 
eral breeders in addition to those of the 
writer are given. 

Members of the Game Conservation 
Society who had the pleasure of hearing 
Mr. Chiles at our game dinners are aware 
that he has a keen sense of humor and 
his book is enlivened with many short 
passages of a game breeder's philosophy 
which will entertain the reader. The 
following is one of a few notes found 
between the serious matter relating to 
pheasants and the white pea-fowl: "Re- 
member when you send the butcher ten 
cents and ask for the largest piece you 
can get for the money he always sends 
you the neck or shank ; and when you 
expect to get a good bird for $1 it is a 
case, as a rule, of neck or shank." Mr. 
Chiles prides himself properly on fair 
dealing, charges good prices for good 
birds and offers, we believe, to let the 
purchaser send them back if they are not 
as represented. He is a member of the 
Game Guild and approves of its activities 
in demanding fair dealing between 
breeders and fair treatment of them by 
game wardens. 

A Mating List and Catalogue, price 
$1. Chiles & Co., publishers, Mt. Ster- 
ling, Ky. 

Elk on the Hoof. 

Early summer quotations on elk on the 
hoof show $20 as the high bid for fair 
to medium. This figure was established 
at the auction sale of New York City 
stock in Prospect Park last week. The 
buyer was a Brooklyn man. Auctioneer 
Cohen also disposed of the season's crop 
of goats, at the rate of four goats for 
$45, which a facetious man who stood 
next to the Deputy Park Commissioner 
said was more than Brooklyn usually 
paid for goats. There was no sale of 
turtles or alligators, although the market 
is said to be high. 

[Elk from city parks and Zoos usually do 
not bring good prices because the animals ar« 
in poor condition, often sick or old. — Editor. I 



THE GAME BREEDER 



145 



The Market. 

Reports indicate that big numbers of 
eggs of wild ducks and pheasants (hun- 
dreds of thousands) were sold during 
the season by our advertisers. Early in 
the season the price was $20 and $25 
per hundred for both kinds of eggs. 
Some late eggs sold for $15 per hundred 
but this was the lowest price quoted to 
The Game Breeder. Quail eggs were 
in big demand and those offered sold 
readily for $6 per dozen and up. Since 
the Massachusetts Commission has 
proved that as many as an hundred quail 
eggs have been laid by a penned bird 
and the average number is large it would 
seem that quail should be more profitable 
than pheasants and ducks. The penned 
birds can be liberated in small gardens 
made safe and attrctive after a number 
of eggs have been gathered and sold and 
the birds will often nest and rear broods 
when so liberated. Mexican quail sold 
for $20 and even $30 per dozen and all 
the birds offered eagerly were purchased. 
Northern quail brought high prices and 
there was a demand for many thousands 
more than could be supplied. Some of 
the Western breeders who have quail 
should make a lot of money next season 
if they will increase the number of their 
flocks and sell both birds and eggs. 

Prairie grouse and ruffed grouse and 
their eggs remained scarce and hard to 
procure. There is a splendid opportunity 
for those who own grouse in the States 
which permit the breeding of all species 
of food birds. The grouse can be pro- 
duced easily and cheaply in protected 
fields and since they find most of their 
food they should be far more profitable 
than pheasants or ducks are. The grouse 
sell readily for $5 each and up and the 
eggs sell for twice as much as pheasant 
and duck eggs. We hope more game 
farmers will breed grouse and those who 
do will make a lot of money since the 
demand far exceeds the supply and only 
a few States permit such industry. Some 
of the States where the grouse have be- 
come extinct are the, best ones in which 
to start grouse breeding since the birds 
are not protected by law. The wild tur- 
keys have been introduced and made 



plentiful on some farms in States where 
the birds are not protected because there 
were no turkeys to protect. Turkeys 
sold readily at $15 to $25 each. The eggs 
sold for $10 and $15 per dozen. 

One day old pheasants and ducks sold 
for 40 and 50 cents each and since these 
birds were delivered successfully both by 
express and by mail we predict that many 
thousands of baby pheasants and chicks 
will be sold next season. Since the 
pheasant is a small eater when compared 
with barnyard poultry and the wild duck 
when properly handled will fly out and 
secure much of its food the industry of 
producing baby pheasants and ducks un- 
doubtedly will be very profitable. Any 
one can gather and sell eggs and it is 
quite easy to hatch the eggs and sell one- 
day old birds. Somewhat more skill is 
required to rear the birds but so many 
have succeeded that it is evident game 
farming is an industry which any one 
who owns a farm will find very profit- 
able. The big commercial game farmers 
who advertise in The Game Breeder are 
always willing to give advice to pur- 
chasers and beginners. Many issue at- 
tractive catalogues and booklets of in- 
struction. Many new shooting clubs and 
individual preserve owners are ready to 
purchase and the State game departments 
also buy largely from the advertisers. 



Farm Fish Ponds. 

George D. Pratt, the New York Con- 
servation Commissioner, says : 

There has been much talk about the value 
of the farm fish pond, and some effort has 
been made to induce farmers to build them to 
supply not only their own domestic needs for 
fish food, but also to produce food fishes for 
market. So far, however, very little practical 
assistance in this direction has been extended. 
Many states raise forest trees in their nur- 
series and sell them at cost of production for 
reforesting private land. In New York State 
we are now endeavoring to extend this idea, 
and are in favor of furnishing fish for a 
brood stock free of charge for farm fish 
ponds, and of supplying additional fish there- 
after at the cost of production. We know 
that fish ponds of this sort are common in 
many of the European countries, particularly 
in Germany and Belgium, and we can certainly 
take a leaf from the German war book in this 
connection. 



146 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Gen. Trexler's Bison Herd. 

Martin S. Garretson, secretary of the 
American Bison Society, organized for 
the permanent preservation and increase 
of the American bison and the protec- 
tion of North American big game, has 
called The World's attention to an error 
in a recently published news dispatch 
from Allentown, Pa. 

The article stated that Gen. Harry 
C. Trexler's herd of forty-seven bison 
was believed to be the largest on this 
continent owned by an individual, rival- 
ing those of the United States and Ca- 
nadian Governments in the great game 
preserves of the Rockies. Mr. Garret- 
son names seven private herds in the 
United States which exceed Gen. Trex- 
ler's in size, the largest, numbering 700, 
on the James Philip estate at Fort Pierre, 
S. D. 

The United States Government, Mr. 
Garretson says, has six bison herds, most 
of them stocked by the American Bison 
Society, the total number of animals be- 
ing between seven and eight hundred. 
The largest herd in the world, he says, 
numbering 2.921, is in Buffalo Park at 
Wainwright, Province of Alberta, Can- 
ada. 

A Telegram. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

Congratulations on putting a little 
common sense in the migratory law. 

Ohio Reader. 

[Bless your good heart we had very little 
to do with it. We never went near the law 
mill during the entire performance. We sus- 
pect some of our readers throughout America 
like yourself may have exerted a good influ- 
ence. Very likely a man at South Bend, just 
over the state line from where you live, may 
have accomplished more than we did. We 
can modestly say that some of our remarks 
may have been suggestive. Like a certain 
brand of fire water. "That's all." — Editor.] 



Where? 

It soon will be time for the "Where- 
are-the-buffalo" lawyers to gather before 
legislative committees, and, with signs 
of great grief expressed in every look 
and gesture, to ask the all-important 
question which annually has been put to 



awe-stricken county and town legislators 
for the last half century. 

"Where are the buffalo ? Gone ! 
Gone ! Gone !" Just here we would re- 
mark that one of our advertisers now 
offers bison in car-load lots. 

"Hence we insist, gentlemen, that we 
must have more restrictive laws to save 
our rabbits and other vanishing wild 
food propositions for sport. The fine 
of $100 for killing a rabbit is far too 
small ; the moiety of $50 per fur for fur 
informers should be much increased. Too 
often, gentlemen, the boy who kills a 
rabbit escapes a jail sentence with a 
paltry $100 fine. More laws ! more laws ! 
are needed to save the vanishing wild 
rabbit, etc., etc." 

We have no hope of stopping the 
performance which annually costs the 
States hundreds of thousands of dollars. 
In all probability enough to feed the 
world with game. In some States we 
have been told that about one-third of 
the time of the legislators is devoted 
to game law changes. All we ask is that 
when the performance goes on game 
breeders be exempt, or if this is not pos- 
sible in one or two States, that the laws 
be made uniform and applied to poultry 
as well as to game in those States. If 
the last named must be protected, "off 
the face of the earth," to be consistent, 
States like Virginia should see that the 
poultry goes with it. 

Sham Partridge Eggs. 
An English dealer in pheasant foods 
under the above heading says: "Many 
contradictory statements have been made 
with regard to the utility of sham part- 
ridge eggs. Some keepers deny their 
usefulness altogether, while others claim 
great things for them if used in certain 
ways. Without entering into these dis- 
cussions we venture to state that pur- 
chasers of our sham eggs during the past 
few years have found them very valua- 
ble. Many partridges' nests are lost 
every season through the bird's unwise 
choice of a site. If artificial nests are 
made in positions where they will be safe 
from floods and one or more of the sham 
eggs are placed therein, partridges will 






THE GAME. BREEDER 



147 



be induced to adopt them. Here they will 
lay in safety and hatch off their broods. 
It is important that sham partridge eggs 
should be of the right weight, size and 
color." 

One of our California members said in 
an article on quail breeding that his birds 
would lay in nests in which he placed 
a marble. We would think that sham 
quail eggs or infertile eggs might be bet- 
ter than marbles. It is important to 
know if quail often will lay to eggs placed 
to induce them to lay in safe places and 
we hope some of the quail breeders will 
make experiments both with marbles and 
with sham eggs and write the results for 
The Game Breeder. It is such details 
we are sure that interest our readers 
most. 



A Little Nonsense. 

Mr. Burnham volunteered the follow- 
ing nonsense to the members of the com- 
mittee : 

"If a man goes from this country and 
shoots on Andrew Carnegie's preserve in 
Scotland he has to furnish his own am- 
munition. He can go out there and join 
the big pheasant shoot, where, for ex- 
ample, a thousand or more pheasants are 
shot in one of those drives, but he is not 
permitted to take one of those birds away 
with him when he leaves. The birds shot 
on these hunting parties are put on the 
market." 

We did not know Andrew was so close. 
On other English preserves guests take 
what they want to eat. Game often is 
given to servants, small farmers, keepers, 
beaters, etc. 

Mr. Burnham further advised the com- 
mittee that these rich men have a definite 
objective in sending all their game to 
market. "And that object is to keep the 
price of game so low in the market that 
there is no inducement for the poacher 
to come on their land and kill these birds 
surreptitiously." 

We would advise Mr. Burnham to tell 
our poultry breeders to' insist that poultry 
be sold very cheap in order to see that 
there be no inducement for chicken 
thieves. We were under the impression 
that English farmers and owners of 



country places desired to get good re- 
turns for their crops to help pay the cost 
of production. 

■* 

Hatching Pheasant Eggs 

Nina Almy. 

The best results are obtained by using 
hens to hatch the eggs. It is very neces- 
sary to keep them well dusted during the 
period of hatching. Do not use hens with 
scaly legs. Whenever it is possible set 
them on the ground, make a small de- 
pression in the ground and use sod or 
cut straw. I have had splendid results 
by setting a hen on a large piece of sod 
in a building to hatch the eggs. 

Whenever it is possible, place the nest 
under bushes, brush or other cover where 
rain will not flood it. 

Eggs of the Chinese ringneck variety 
require twenty-five days to hatch, they 
may be moistened from time, to time just 
as you would those of a hen. Do not 
disturb the young chicks for twenty-four 
hours after they are hatched, and unless 
the weather is very warm, do not 
give them any water until they are 
a week old. The first food for young 
pheasants may be hard-boiled eggs, 
and they should not be fed until they are 
twenty-four hours old. Eggs should be 
grated through a piece of wire netting, 
they should be fed four times a day or 
every four hours, being careful to feed 
only as much as they will clean up. It 
must be kept in mind that the pheasant is 
a light eater and naturally a wild bird, 
and requires only from one-tenth to one- 
twentieth part the amount a chicken 
should be fed on. 

Instead of boiled eggs the first food 
may consist of eggs and potatoes boiled 
in the same kettle until the potatoes are 
soft and the yolks of the eggs will crum- 
ble. Mash potatoes, using two parts to 
one of eggs. Use the same food for three 
days, then add lettuce, onion tops or mil- 
let. Keep plenty of green food before 
them. If it suits your convenience you 
may scald thick sour milk until the whey 
and curd separate, then strain and use 
dry curd, mixed with equal parts of 
ground hemp and canary seed, about four 
parts of curd to one of seed with very 



148 



THE GAME BREEDER 



little pepper added. When unable to ob- 
tain ground seed I have fed the whole 
seed in the same proportions. This 
should be staple food until they are six 
weeks old, then they can be fed the same 
as hens. They do not care much for 
oats. Never forget green food in winter, 
also apples, cabbage and table scraps. 
Never give pepper, grass or (sorrel) to 
pheasants, it is unhealthy for them. 

The pheasant is naturally very strong 
in flight. Confining them was first ac- 
complished by covering the pen or yards 
with wire netting, but the expense of that 
method was so great that some pheasant 
raisers have abandoned it and instead of 
doing that clip one wing of the flight 
feathers to prevent flying, but some suc- 
cessful raisers of these birds take a sharp 
shears, prepare a saucer of boracic acid 
and calomel or even wood ashes and take 
each chick when between four days and 
a_week old, clip off one wing at the first 
joint, immediately dipping the raw end of 
the wind in the powder and turning the 
bird loose. This is called pinioning. It 
has no injurious effects on the birds, they 
recover quickly and it prevents their fly- 
ing thereafter more than three or four 
feet in height, and permits them to be 
confined in an uncovered garden or yard 
surrounded by poultry netting fence. 
Birds raised to be liberated for stocking 
purposes should not be pinioned. Not 
more than one male should be kept with 
six hens. Plenty of perches and a house 
that is open on the south side is all that 
is necessary for shelter. 



Poultry Finance. 

(From the Washington Star) 

"An egg is mighty valuable these days." 

"Of course," assented Farmer Corn- 

tossel. "An egg will bring almost enough 

to pay for feeding the hen until she lays 

the next one." 

The pheasant can beat this gate when 
poultry eggs sell for 70 cents, eggs of the 
common pheasant sell for $3.50 per dozen, 
and the pheasant eats much less than a com- 
mon barnyard hen. — Game Breeder. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 

Injurious Insects and Useful Birds. 

By F. L. Washburn, Professor of 

Entomology, University of Minnesota. 

J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia, 1918. 

Pp. 1-453. Price, $175. 

The readers of The Game Breeder 
are outdoor men and women who are 
constantly dealing with insect pests, and 
the greatest living agents in limiting 
their excessive number — birds. Wash- 
burn's book is abundantly illustrated so 
that it makes an excellent hand-book for 
the identification of many field, garden 
and forest insects, household pests, and 
those which attack domestic animals, in- 
cluding poultry. The book devotes much 
attention to approved remedies for the 
control of these abundant animals. This 
feature of the book is particularly prac- 
tical as it brings together in small space 
a great number of practical suggestions. 

Most of the book is devoted to insects 
and their allies. The discussion of birds 
is from the standpoint of the farmer who 
should protect birds in order to gain bird 
protection from insect pests. This chap- 
ter is not very satisfactory because it 
attempts too much in a brief space. In 
attempting to mention many kinds of 
birds the continuity of the evidence 
showing the relation of birds to agricul- 
ture is not clearly and forcibly presented. 
There is a final chapter on quadruped 
pests of the farm. Here is summarized 
the injuries and the methods of control- 
ling rabbits, gophers, squirrels and their 
allies, and a few predacious animals such 
as the fox, weasel and racoon, which 
among game are vermin. This part in- 
cludes the various approved methods of 
killing by traps and poisons. An unusual 
feature of the book consists in assem- 
bling the treatment of all these pests in 
one volume,' and the author has succeeded 
in bringing together a large amount of 
practical experience in convenient form 
for use. 

The author's hope that he has pro- 
duced a book suitable for agricultural 
high schools and colleges invites the sug- 
gestion that it is too encyclopaedic in 
form for that purpose, and lacks ade- 
quate emphasis and development of the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



149 



general principles which should underlie 
an educational treatment of such a com- 
plex subject. 

The book gives evidence of careful 
preparation. An error, however, is noted 
(p. 411) where Forbes is cited as author 
of Forbush's "Useful Birds and Their 
Protection." Charles C. Adams. 

The New York State College of For- 
estry, at Syracuse, N. Y. 



year ; the wheat raisers have licked the 
Hessian fly. — From the Cleveland Plain 
Dealer. 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

HE BEGAN AT THE TOP. 

Bacon — See you've got a new gar- 
dener. 

Egbert — -Yes, such as he is. 

"Where did he learn garden work?" 

"He says he began at the top." 

"At the top?" 

"Yes, he was a waiter in a roof gar- 
den. — Yonkers Statesman. 

a $10,000 COAT. 
A curio dealer in Steubenville, Ohio, 
has a coat covered with 3,800 elk teeth, 
which he values at $10,000. The coat 
was made by an Indian in Manitoba, 
Canada, and is sinew sewed. It weighs 
twenty-eight pounds. — Milwaukee Sen- 
tinel. 

THE FISHES' FAULT. 

As long as fish bite on Sunday people 
will go after them — The Atchinson 
Globe. 

AN EXCEPTION. 

"Clothes don't make the man." 
"Oh, I don't know. Uncle Sam's uni- 
form is making many a man to-day." — 
From the Detroit Free Press. 

BY WAY OF PROOF. 

Why doesn't Gen. von Stein, who says 
the French Army has been beaten, run 
down to Paris for the weekend? — From 
the Charleston News and Courier. 

PROGRESS IN KENTUCKY. 

First the individual drinking-cup. 
Next bone-dry Prohibition and the indi- 
vidual still? — From the Louisville Cour- 
ier-Journal. 

ANOTHER DRIVE HALTED. 

Nothing German has any chance this 



The Farmer and the Skunk. 

By Henry Scamman. 
I'm an easy goin' farmer 
Very peaceable inclined 
But this tarnation game law 
Makes trie want to speak my mind. 

An' by jinks I'm going to do it 
Though it's rare that I complain 
Don't believe in always kickin' 
Cause it does or does not rain. 

Now I think it's right protectin' 
Moose an' deer and chipimunks 
But the law gets too inclusive 
When it starts protectin' skunks. 

These idees of conservation 
On the whole are good I think 
But we overdo the business 
When we start consarvin' stink. 

Skunks is not the kind of critters 
That we like to have around 
An' I claim it's right to kill 'em 
Just as fast as they air found. 

For the devils will steal chickens 
Perfume up your dog or cat 
An' if you ain't on the lookout 
You'll get served the same as that. 

But the law says skunks is sacred 
And perhaps that law is sane 
But it strikes me mighty funny 
That you can't kill skunks in Maine. 

An' I can not help from wishin' 
That the men that made this law 
May be out some moonlight evenin' 
In a March or April thaw. 

And as proudly home they saunter 
Just before the moon has sunk 
They may find each door blockaded 
By an ever watchful skunk. 
Phillips, March 19, 1917. 



Snake Steals Door Knob. 
Coleman, Tex., Oct. 27. — A chicken snake 
took a chance at a door knob which J. W. 
Tabor, who lives near this town, had placed 
in his henhouse as a "nest egg." Finding his 
snakeship writhing in agony Mr. Tabor put 
him out of his misery with a club. 



150 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited bv DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, AUGUST 1918. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Hcntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



The bigger the shooting syndicate and 
the smaller the dues the better. Every 
one should get into the sport producing 
and have some fine "sport alluring" on 
the side. 



We are inclined to believe that Section 
12 of the new Migratory Bird Law is 
constitutional. This section reads : 
"Nothing in this act shall be construed 
to prevent the breeding of migratory 
game birds on farms and preserves and 
the sale of birds so bred under proper 
regulation for the purpose of increasing 
the food supply." This repair made to 
the bill before it was enacted is inter- 
esting and timely. 



Section 10 of the Migratory Bird Law 
seems to indicate that the amateur who 
wrote it might have constructed an un- 
constitutional measure. It says: ''If 
any clause, sentence, paragraph or part 
of this act shall, for any reason, be ad- 
judged by any court of competent juris- 
diction to be invalid, such judgment shall 
not affect, impair or invalidate the re- 
mainder thereof.'' 

Possibly the Supreme Court may hold 
that Congress has not the power to cre- 
ate a new legislative assembly composed 
of game law enthusiasts and to author- 
ize such a new law-making body to make 



new United States crimes, "while you 
wait," so to speak. The fact that these 
new criminal laws must be sent ( like 
laws made in the older Congress ) to the 
President for his approval may make 
them appear to have the same safeguard 
that the old style criminal laws relat- 
ing to murder and moonshine, etc., have. 
In so far as the veto is concerned, this 
is true, but how about sending people to 
jail because they may be found guilty 
of new crimes which have not been cre- 
ated by the law-makers elected by the 
people? Some courts regard crime as 
a serious matter not to be multiplied 
lightly or without the due consideration 
of the duly elected law-makers. 

If someone happens to kill a mud 
hen and to eat it at some season he 
may start something in the courts. 



THE HOT BIRD AND THE COLD 
BOTTLE. 

If the Congress is determined to make 
the country bone-dry there is a certain 
amount of propriety in the legislation 
prohibiting any one in the District of 
Columbia from eating a wild food bird 
or having it in possession, as the 
statutes read. 

The hot bird and the cold bottle long 
have been associated in prose as well as 
in song and poetry, and it seems fitting 
that the foods which are very cheap in 
civilized countries should go with the 
beverages. Those who wish to eat a 
grouse or a pheasant, a partridge or a 
wild fowl, can run over to England, 
France or any other free country after 
the cruel war is over and there they will 
find more freedom in the matter of eating 
than there is in the land of the free. 
The wines of France also go especially 
well with any of the best human foods, 
endorsed by' all real naturalists. There 
was a time to be sure when it was fash- 
ionable to imprison and even to execute 
women because they stole some raiment 
to clothe starving, naked children. Even 
at such times women were not arrested, 
as they have been in America, and fined 
and jailed for producing food on their 
lands or for having the stock birds or 



THE GAME BREEDER 



151 



eggs in their possession. Possibly the 
women who vote may not approve of the 
action of Congress intended to close the 
markets to food produced by industry. 
The quail, the grouse and all the other 
good foods should be sold in Washing- 
ton. 



THE PROGRESS OF WILD LIF- 
ING— PROTECTION. 

When the Bam Bill, intended to pre- 
vent the sale of a rabbit, was pending 
in New York, we suggested that it would 
be wise not to introduce a new bill 
permitting the breeding and sale of game 
and encouraging field sports on farms 
where it seemed desirable to encourage 
these laudable performances. The 
pending bill had a good place on 
the calendar and our idea was that 
it would be easier and quicker to 
have the bill repaired so that instead of 
prohibiting the sale of rabbits and other 
wild foods it would permit and encour- 
age the breeding and sale of deer as 
well as the other wild foods, including 
rabbits. We attended the hearing as a 
spectator and reporter. We said a few 
words to the committee when asked to 
do so by the presiding Senator, Mr, 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, now Assistant 
Secretary of the Navy. He quickly saw 
the great economic importance of the 
change in the bill and soon it was evi- 
dent that the committee would put an 
end to the proposed nonsense before it 
adjourned. The bill prohibiting the sale 
of a rabbit and other foods was amended 
so as to permit the sale of deer, pheas- 
ants and wild ducks, and the Governor, 
who had promised to sign it after the 
needed repairs were made, quickly did so. 

Only twenty or twenty-five thousand 
dollars were blown in, we believe, to save 
the rabbit. We published the names of 
the contributors to the wild lifing fund 
and the amounts contributed by each at 
the time. Mr. H. C. Frick headed the 
list with $1,500. 

We predicted that there would be 
much shouting about the victory for wild 
life and there was. The name of the 
bill, at least, was saved ! The Bain Bill 
has passed ! The Bain Bill has passed ! 



A new fund needed to further the vvild- 
lifing! etc., etc. 

When it appeared that the quail were 
thriving on Long Island quite near the 
great city of New York, and were doing 
so well that they appeared to prove that 
shooting can be preserved without too 
much wildlifing and game protecting, a 
vast fund was raised to prohibit quail 
shooting on Long Island. The Game 
Breeder protested against this nonsense 
since it would put an end to the quail 
breeders and probably result in exter- 
minating the quail. We have very little 
money to spend in protecting field sports 
and food production from their enemies, 
but a matter of fifty dollars or so for 
postage helped some in bringing out the 
breeders and they quickly ran the wild 
lifer and his able consulting naturalist. 
Doctor Weeks, D. S. C, off the island. 

The quail have responded nicely to 
the victory and last week we heard them 
whistling on all four sides of the house 
on the game preserve of the Long Island 
Game Breeders' Association, a new place 
started since the victory on Long Island. 

When the Migratory Bill was pending 
(long, long ago it was), we suggested 
to Mr. Burnham that since the bill said 
you "must not" in such long-winded 
phrases it would be wise to change it so 
that in so far as game breeders are con- 
cerned, it would say "you may." In 
other words, we still had the idea that 
it would be wise to encourage food pro- 
duction and field sports and not to give 
a new national police force the right to 
join the more vicious elements of some 
of the State Departments, who being un- 
able to find much game elsewhere, had 
formed the habit of raiding game farms 
( including the owners of a few birds in 
back yards) and shaking them down for 
various sums because they did not know 
about the license to keep birds and for 
other trivial offenses calculated to ham- 
per the new industry. Mr. Burnham 
informed us he would inquire if this item 
of common sense could be inserted in 
the bill and later we were told it could 
not be. We are not common lobbyists 
like the others who collect vast sums for 
the wild lifing-game-protection enter- 



152 



THE GAME BREEDER 



prises, but we decided that a little pub- 
licity might hold up the measure for re- 
pairs and our readers are aware that we 
gave a few lines, now and then, to this 
public service. We gave as much space 
to the game law as seemed to be fair. 
Our subscribers who are engaged in 
game breeding are entitled to find some- 
thing besides game laws in the maga- 
zine. We need some space for pictorial 
advertisements of the sale of game and 
other interesting facts and notes about 
game abundance, the breeders' methods, 
etc., etc. These should not, of course, 
be crowded out. It soon seemed likely 
that the bill which said ''you mustn't'' 
could not get through until it was re- 
paired so as to say "you may," just as 
the bill which prohibited the sale of a 
rabbit had rough sailing until it was 
slightly modified so as to permit the 
sale of a deer, etci There were long 
waits. There were many excursions to 
Washington and much lobbying; all of 
this could have been avoided had our 
advice been heeded and had the simple 
little repair we suggested been inserted 
lone ago. The new Section 12 says: 
"Nothing in this act shall be construed 
to prevent the breeding of migratory 
game birds on farms and preserves and 
the sale of birds so bred under proper 
regulation for the purpose of increas- 
ing the food supply." This is a simple 
permissive section, easily understood, 
and the breeders of migratory birds can 
safelv go right on with their business 
without any interference. Since the 
States cannot enact laws, as we under- 
stand the proposition, which conflict with 
the U. S. law, anyone who wishes to do 
so can get into the food production in- 
dustry or can have the game birds for 
sport or for profit without State inter- 
ference. 

We congratulate our readers who took 
an interest in the matter upon the good 
outcome of their efforts. There ,are 
many thousands of game breeders in 
America and the number is increasing 
rapidly. We would advise them in the 
future when State laws are proposed 
prohibiting quail shooting or putting the 
grouse or other wild food birds on the 



song bird list, to see that the bills which 
say you mustn't be repaired before they 
are enacted so as to read that, nothing 
in the act shall be construed to pre- 
vent the breeding of the food-songsters 
on the farms and preserves and the sale 
of the birds so bred for the purpose of 
increasing the food supply. There are 
many capable and intelligent State Game 
officers who do not approve of the New 
York wild lifer-protectionists rushing 
into their States and prohibiting field 
sports for terms of years or forever. It 
should be an easy matter to run them 
out. By permitting those who desire to 
increase the food supply to do so, field 
sports can be kept open, for all hands, 
since the game overflowing from the 
fields of abundance will keep supplying 
the public lands and waters with game 
for those who are not producers. The 
country is so big that there is no danger 
of there being too many preserves. Since 
most of the farms are now posted against 
shooting and the States are enacting laws 
putting food birds on the song bird list 
and prohibiting field sports, no harm 
will result in our calling a halt so that 
some of the posted farms can be made 
to yield abundantly and so that upland 
field sports can be kept alive. 

Those who put in all of their time at- 
tempting to secure laws preventing the 
production of desirable foods do not seem 
to be as well engaged just now as those 
who are actively engaged in producing 
tons of food. The idea that in the in- 
terest of wild-lifing it must be a crime 
to profitably produce food on a farm 
seems to be vanishing rapidly. North 
America soon will become the biggest 
game-producing country in the world. 



THE WILD DUCK SICKNESS. 

An outline of a recent bulletin on the 
Duck Sickness in Utah is printed on an- 
other page. The bulletin, containing 25 
pages, is full of interesting matter not 
only about the trouble in Utah but also 
about similar troubles in other regions 
in California, Oregon, Montana and 
Kansas where the cause of death was 
similar to that producing duck sickness 



THE GAME BREEDER 



153 



in Utah. It is said that the Kansas 
ducks may have suffered from some bac- 
terial affection. The bulletin can be pro- 
cured from the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments, Government Printing Office, 
Washington, D. C, at 10 cents per copy. 

There are many excellent duck clubs 
which own preserves in the affected 
areas and since a considerable outlay of 
money will be needed to provide fresh 
water in some of the marshes, we be- 
lieve it would be wise for the clubs to 
employ gamekeepers and to rear large 
numbers of ducks. The shooting can be 
much improved and a sale of a big lot of 
ducks would no doubt pay the cost of 
rearing them and supply all or a good 
part of the funds needed to keep the 
water fresh and the ducks in good health. 
The markets of Utah should be kept full 
of wild ducks and the Eastern markets 
will eagerly take all the ducks offered. 

Many of the Eastern clubs now sell 
wild ducks to hotels and to the markets 
and in so doing they become of great 
economic importance and perform a pub- 
lic service, highly commendable just now 
when food production is important and 
necessary. There often is a prejudice 
against clubs which monopolize good 
shooting grounds but this rapidly disap- 
pears when it becomes known that the 
clubs are producing more game than they 
shoot and that much of it is shot outside 
of the preserves. 

This prejudice even made its appear- 
ance in the vicinity of one of the clubs 
organized by members of the Game Con- 
servation Society, although the ducks 
were produced about an artificial pond. 
When, however, it became known that 
over a thousand ducks went out from 
the place in a season and that many of 
these, besides a big lot of pheasants and 
quail, were shot by outsiders, the preju- 
dice quickly disappeared and the club 
became popular. 



WHY NOT BREED QUAIL AND 

GROUSE? 

All naturalists and all sportsmen know 
that it is a very easy matter to introduce 
grouse and quail on protected areas and 



quickly to make these splendid foods so 
plentiful that they could be sold in the 
markets as cheaply as the European 
grouse and partridges are sold in the 
foreign markets. 

The pheasants easily are reared in big 
numbers and since the laws were amend- 
ed a few years ago permitting game 
breeders to produce pheasants without 
fear of arrest the pheasants have become 
so abundant in many places that it will 
be no longer necessary to send money 
abroad to purchase pheasants. 

Why should American breeders be 
compelled to send thousands of dollars 
annually to Mexico for small quail when 
the larger Northern birds easily could 
be produced on American farms in suffi- 
cient numbers to supply the demands of 
all those who wish to purchase quail for 
breeding purposes for sport or for food? 
It seems nonsensical for the laws to say 
that money only can be sent to Mexico 
for quail just as it was sent a few years 
ago to other foreign countries in pay- 
ment for pheasants. 

Quail shooting has been ended, proba- 
bly forever, in many States. Some quail 
survive in parts of these States but they 
are of no value either for food or for 
sport and they are not of any appreciable 
value as insect destroyers since there are 
not enough of them. 

A little spraying of the plants will 
do more good in a few minutes than the 
few quail which survive will do in a year. 
Granting that the quail are beneficial to 
agriculture, why should not the State 
permit and encourage the farmers to 
make and to keep them profitably plen- 
tiful? Why encourage the breeding of 
fish and prevent the production of quail? 
The answer can be expressed in three 
words: "Nonsense! Nonsense! Non- 
sense !" 

Why should a State game department 
or a State legislature persist in being 
nonsensical ? 



WHY NOT MORE GAME? 



154 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and BO. 000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. hi. DOWNS 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



FOR SALE. YOUNG BIRDS, THIS YEAR'S HATCH, 
one wing pinioned. Silver, $7.50 per pair; Goldens, 
$7.50 per pair; Ringnecks, $500 per pair; Mongolians, 
$6.50 per pair; Lady Amhersts, $12.50 per pair; Reeves, 
$12.50 per pair; Redhead Ducks, $10.00 per pair; Man- 
darin Ducks, $12.50 per pair; Wood Ducks, $12.50 per pair; 
Mexican Tree Ducks, $12.50 per pair. M.R.CHEESMAN, 
Murray, R. F. D. No. 3, Utah. 3t 



Phone, 9286 Farragut 



FINE FURS 



JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 Soulh East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and fanciers' News 

SCRAINTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys 'including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 1 



THE GAME BREEDER 155 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 

FOR SALE 

Hatched This Year 

Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. "We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable \o all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTJJVG 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese. Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



THE VERMIN QUESTION. beneficial than harmful sometimes ac- 
The Biological Survey favors the ex- quire perverted appetites in the presence 
termination of wolves because they de- of large numbers of young game birds 
stroy sheep. It seems perfectly logical and eggs, and it would seem to be just 
to say the breeder of game should con- as proper for the breeder of game to de- 
trol its natural enemies when they are stroy such enemies, as it is for sheep 
observed to be destroying game birds, a owners to destroy wolves, 
highly desirable food. As a matter of fact much vermin is 
Laws protecting certain predatory spe- driven away by persecution and it is to 
cies, at all times or during certain sea- be hoped it will go to the places owned 
sons, should contain, always, exceptions by naturalists who seem to be over-scien- 
permitting the farmer or sportsman, who tine when they jump at the conclusion 
is engaged in rearing game, to control that because the stomach of a creature 
these species when they are observed to does not show any game, when examined 
be destroying birds and eggs. in places where there is no game, that 
It is well known in the older coun- the species is only beneficial, when as a 
tries, where game is an abundant and matter of fact the game keeper may say 
cheap food supply, that it is impossible to it takes several birds in a day in places 
destroy all the vermin which seeks to where game is reared in abundance, 
take the game. A continual war is waged The fact that certain hawks eat grass- 
by keepers against vermin. There is a hoppers and on this account should be 
disposition to ascertain what species of spared does not seem important to a 
vermin preys largely on the game and game breeder who produces so many 
what species take it only occasionally, game birds that there is often not enough 
Game keepers are aware, however, that grasshoppers to go round, 
some of the species deemed to be more Even if it be true, as it no doubt is 



156 



THE GAME BREEDER 



i^k^gMism 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants ; 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



■'••i 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

1 5 Whitehall Street, New York 



that certain hawks take mice, the keeper 
should not be compelled to preserve' the 
hawks, if his pheasants destroy the mice 
and if he can control them with terriers 
sufficiently to grow all the food his 
game birds require. 

When a beneficial hawk is observed 
to be taking game regularly the owner of 
the game should certainly decide if he 
wishes to have that hawk removed. 

To argue otherwise seems to us to be 
sheer nonsense. 

Often we have pointed out that the 
smaller hawks and owls, the bluejays, and 
some other enemies should not be indis- 
criminately destroyed. The rule should 
be to observe what damage is done and 
to stop even a so-called "beneficial" when 
he becomes very destructive. 

The country is large, the species that 
prey on game are numerous and tre- 
mendously over-abundant in many places 
when compared with the remnant of game 
which is left. In some places it is im- 
possible to restore the game because the 
game enemies are so numerous as to 
keep nature's balance upset in the wrong; 



THE GAME BREEDER 



157 




WE HAVE 

For Sale 

Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tic, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. I. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 fornew Colortype Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



RABBITS 



PAY BIG PROPITS 

Raise Your Own Meat 



and Fur. The Pet Stock Journal, Box G, Lamoni, Iowa, 
will show you the best methods for pleasure or profit. 
Send 25c today for 8 months' trial subscription to 
America's leading rabbit and pet stock publication. 



direction. Until our markets become full 
of cheap game the activities of the food 
producers should not be checked by too 
many restrictive laws, as often we have 
pointed out. Let us restore the game 
and make it plentiful and in the meantime 
let us urge all good keepers to observe 
what species do the most damage and 
to only destroy the individual "bene- 
ficials" which appear to be doing enough 
damage to warrant their control on the 
game farm where game is reared abun- 
dantly. 



More Game. 

People usually get what they go after. 
We went after "more game" and quickly 
we secured many tons of game. We 
have helped to harvest several tons of 
food in a single season on a place quite 
near New York. 



DOGS 

HOUNDS-ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, beai and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2joq 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 

TWO YOUSG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 

sale. Dog and Bach. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York. 3t 



JE&- 


BOOK ON 


?/ fflB^ 


DOG DISEASES 


"PC? 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



FOR SALE-BREEDERS— SOEMMERINGS, MAN- 
churians, Swinhoes, Amhersts, Reeves, Mongolians. 
E. B. DRAKE, Ingram, Pa. 



• It seems to be a little strange for the 
Protective Society, which claims to favor 
game, to be actively engaged promoting 
a bill before a congressional committee 
intended to prevent the sale of all game in 
one of the good markets. Washington, 
why not prevent the sale of oysters and 
fish? 



His Opinion. 

Mrs. Yeast — What would you call a 
man who agrees with everybody ? 

Mr. Yeast— A fool. 

"And suppose it was a woman?" 

"It isn't possible that any woman 
would." — Yonkers Statesman. 



Cat Has "Whooping Cough." 

Fremont, O., Feb. 23. — A. W. Haaser, 
sanitary policeman, who has been en- 
gaged tacking up whooping cough quar- 
antine signs, is authority for the state- 
ment that whooping cough is not an af- 
fliction confined to the human race. He 
says that at one place visited where a 
number of the children were ill he also 
noticed the pet family cat was "whooping 
it up." 9 



158 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Breeders' Cards 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member cf the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ring necks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 
BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

Member of the Game Guild. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $6.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 
Member of the Game Guild. 

Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 








DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all, of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 

ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 

The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, ' ' 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G 



THE GAME BREEDER 



159 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN. SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

TH03. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

We have Ringnecks and ten la 
other species of Phea^nts. 
Eggs in season. One day 
old pheasant chicks 65 
cents each. Flemish Giants 
and other rabbits. 

THE MAPLE GROVE PHEASANTRY AND PET 

STOCK FARM, 43ldenAve., Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassati Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



FOR SALE 
These Pheasants will be in full plumage this fall: 4 pair 
Silvers, $30 00; 2 extra hens, $10.00. 1 pair Swinhoes, 
3)35 00. 1 pair Mongolian, $7.00; 3 extra cocks, »6 00. 
10 Ringneck hens, $30.00; 4 Ring neck cocks, $5.00 3 pair 
Lad\ Amhersts, $50-00 ; 1 extra cock, $10 00. 1 pair Gold- 
ens, $8.00 ; 3 extra hens, $15.00. 1 pair Reeves, $15 00 : 
2 extra hens, $20 00. 5 pair Cinaaa geese, 5 years old, 
$35.00. 6 pair Redheads, $50 00 ; 1 pair Baldpates, $5 00 ; 
1 pair Pintails, $3 00. 1 pair wood ducks, $12 50; 1 pair 
Mandarin ducks. $12 50. 1 pair Mexican tree ducks, $12-50. 
M. R. CHRhSMAN, Murray, Utah, R F.D. No. 3. Box61. 

FOR SALE— PET FEMALE COON. GUARANTEED 

breeder, three years old. Had five last litter. Stamp 

for reply. BEN BOWMAN, Monroe Ave., Canton, Ohio 

It 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA. 

Breedef5# should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

LIVE GAME 

WILD TURKEVS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. VV. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — RINGNECK, GOLDEN PHEASANT, 
and silver. We are going to close out our pheasantry. 
Prices reasonable. OCCONEECHEE FARM, Durham, 
N. C. 

FOR SALE-PHEASANTS, PURE BRED CHINESE 

Eggs, $3.50 per dozen, $25.00 per hundred. NINA 

ALMY, Middleburgh, N. Y. It 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices: Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Ggften Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wing Teal, 
$3 75 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT. Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of ail kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, st rong.heahhy birds for sale. GIF FORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward'St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunrield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. dot) 

yUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game P.iru. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and While 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

BELGIAN HARES AND FLEMISH GIANTS FOR 

sale. Al stock. C. W. DIXON, 8612 Morgan Street, 

Chicago, 111. It 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



Swans, Brandt, DucKs 



TWO PAIR LARGE WHITE ROYAL SWAN OF 
England, mature birds, $150.00 a pair. Also two pair 
young Swan from same birds, $100.00 pair. Two pair 
Black Brandt, rare, very handsome, $40 00 pair. Two 
pair whistling Tree Ducks, $40.00 pair. One pair Crested 
Turkeys (currasaws , $75. 00 pair. Immediate delivery. 
Also rare wild Pigeons, Pheasants, foreign birds of song 
and plumage. J L. OAKES, 44 West Maple Avenue, 
Denver, Colorado. It 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



160 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FOR SALE-ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS 
eggs from unrelated stock. Birds kept in their wild 
state with unlimited range. Cultivated under the most 
healthful and normal conditions. Also pure wild mallard 
ducks' eggs from flight birds. TURTLE LAKE GAME 
FARM, Hillman, Michigan. it 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS — Many for sale by 

dozen or hundred. Ready now. Guarantee arrive O.K. 

MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Box 70 

Kansas. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. 

Chinese Ri- gneck pheasant eggs, $3.50 per do»en. 

Golden pheasant eggs 50c each. Mrs. EDGAR TILTON, 

Suffern. New York. 4t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 
An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lots. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges. W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



■D/~\/^T^"0 Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

OV/V/lVO Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



WISH CHANGE OF POSITION AS POULTRY 

man or gamekeeper by married man. No children. 

Life experience, four years at present position, excellent 

references. L. W. WERTHEIM, Hillsboro, N. C. It 

GAMEKEEPER — POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 
gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionport, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPER-SITUATION WANTED 

American game breeder with a 15 year experience wishes 
to raise 5000 ringnecks for a private party or State, and 
having an incubator and brooder plant. Apply to THE 
GAME BREEDER, .50 Nassau St , New York, N. Y. 

HEAD KEEPER SCOTCH, WISHES A POSITION 
Small family, four years' good reference from present 
employer, good reason for leaving. Experienced on 
pheasants, quail, wild turkey and mallards. Ten years' 
references in this country. Apply J. C. E., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER.- SITUATION WANTED. — I can 
furnish good English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper; can rear thousands of birds, and train 
dogs. £ic. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to get a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address J. H., care of The Game Breeder, ISO 
Nassau Street, New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



200 PHEASANTS WANTED WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age ot birds. 
R. A. MAXWELL, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS,$5.00APAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED. EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS. 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH, ONAWA, 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
M AGAZI NE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 



ALL GAME BREEDERS SHOULD REMEMBER 
that Meal Worms are just as choice a food for the old 
birds as for the young; of course, as a rule, they are not 
fed to the old because they will live without them, except 
occasionally by a man of means, who does not believe in * 
depriving his birds of an occasional luxury. However, ad , 
breeders should keep on hand a pan or two of meal worms, > 
to feed to their old birds when a little out ot sorts, at 
moulting time or when being dosed with drugs. Meal 
worms are an excellent tonic, because a natural insect food. 
500 at $1.00, 1,000 at $1.50, 5.000 at $5 00. All express pre- 
paid. C. B. KERN, 10 East Main Street, Mount Joy, 
Pennsylvania. It 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters': "Yours for More Game. 



Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 





I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest order* for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beat 
Royal Swans of England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock Is kept under practically natural conditions. I have fiO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia 

WM J. MACKENSEN 

Department V YARDLEY. BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of Tbe Game Guild 





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VOL. XIII. 



SEPTEMBER, 1918 



No. 6 




The- Object of this magazine- is 
tomake: north america the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTRADICTORY LAW 



MIGRATORY BIRD LAW 

Section 12. Nothing in this act shall be construed to pre- 
vent the breeding* of Migratory Game Birds on Farms and 
Preserves and the sale of birds so bred under proper regu- 
lations for the purpose of increasing the food supply. 



PRESERVE 

The word Preserve is defined as, " A place in which game 
is protected for the purposes of sport." 

Funk and Wagnals Standard Dictionary. 



REGULATION OF U. S. BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
MADE UNDER THE MIGRATORY BIRD LAW 

Regulation 8. Sec. 2. "Migratory waterfowl, except the 
birds taken under paragraph 1 of this Regulation (the birds 
trapped for breeding stock), so possessed may by killed by 
him (the person having a permit) in any manner EXCEPT 
BY SHOOTING . . . and the birds so killed may be sold 
and transported." 



If it is true that a Preserve is a place where game is properly looked after for purposes of 
sport, and if it is true that the farmers and sportsmen who conduct such places keep the game 
in the markets for the people to eat at prices cheaper than poultry, as Mr. Burnham said 
they do, it would seem that the Survey should not be permitted to make a regulation (having 
the effect of a criminal law) intended to prevent the breeding, sale and shooting of game. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 18713. 







aWI 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE" GAME: CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

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THE GAME BREEDER 



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THE GAME BREEDER 



163 




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THE GAME BREEDER 



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CONTENTS 

Survey of the Field 

The Migratory Treaty Act and the Regulations 

The Golden Pheasant - - - - - W. Sinclair 

Court-Made Law and How To Trap Wild Ducks - - By the Editor 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - - By Our Readers 

Important Correspondence with The Biological Survey 

Editorials — To the Biological Survey — No Game Farming, No Game 
. Keepers — No Food Wanted! — Finishing Touches 



THREE THOUSAND 

Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 

FALL DELIVERY 
Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, • 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 






In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 1 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIII 



SEPTEMBER, 1918 
CD 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 6 



Meeting of State Game Officers. 

The State Game Officers will meet in 
New York this month and it is to be 
hoped that some patriotic action may be 
taken looking to an increase in the num- 
ber of American game birds and animals 
as a food supply. When the war started 
wild fowl and upland game birds were 
cheaper in England than poultry. The 
delicious teal was quoted in the market 
reports as low as a shilling and larger 
ducks, pheasants and other upland game 
birds were plentiful and absurdly cheap. 
Every one (including market gunners ) 
is allowed to shoot and sell wild fowl 
in England. 

The owners of large country places, 
the owners of small farms, the big pre- 
serves and the club syndicates which 
owned or rented shooting places and 
thousands of market gunners all con- 
tributed to make the game cheap and 
abundant. 

Since the entire area of the British 
Isles is much smaller than some of our 
states and the ponds and lakes suitable 
for duck breeding are few in number 
and area when compared to such places 
in America, it is quite evident that a 
very little of our desolate lands and 
waters, where little or no game occurs, 
can be made to produce quickly all the 
game our people can eat. 

Many game farmers in England al- 
ways stand ready to supply the shoots 
with birds and eggs for breeding and 
shooting purposes. There now are many 
game farmers in America who can sup- 
ply the clubs of sportsmen with birds 
and eggs. All that is needed is for the 
sportsmen to get busy under the advice 
and encouragement of their state officers 
and to organize game producing clubs, 



and it is to be hoped that the state game 
officers will lend the food producers 
every encouragement. Trap shooting 
clubs purchase their targets and own or 
rent their shooting grounds. No good 
reason can be assigned why the game 
shooting clubs should not purchase birds 
and eggs from the game farmers who 
advertise in the Game Breeder and get 
busy producing game on some of the 
posted farms, with their owners' per- 
mission, of course. There is no good 
reason why they should not produce 
millions of wild fowl about small ponds 
where no ducks are seen today, some of 
which may be drained and lost to sport 
forever if they be not utilized. 

The game protective societies find it 
easy to procure more game laws. The 
game producing clubs find it easy to 
procure "more game." 

Moving Pictures. 

It is reported that George Bates, mov- 
ing picture maker, will make films illus- 
trating field trial clogs at work on the 
prairie. People who have seen the thor- 
oughbreds go into action at a field trial 
know how picturesque and interesting 
such pictures can be made, and many 
sportsmen will be delighted to see the 
setters and the pointers at the movies. 

Ruffed Grouse in Pennsylvania. 

The Field says all but eleven coun- 
ties in Pennsylvania have asked for the 
closing of the hunting of ruffed grouse 
for two years. Nine of the eleven coun- 
ties have sent word that they will have 
their papers on file asking for the clos- 
ing of grouse shooting and the two 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



counties remaining are Philadelphia and 
Delaware. The first named has no 
shooting district and' the second has no 
grouse. 

In due time it seems likely all of the 
counties may become like the last two. 
It would be a good time to start some 
grouse clubs, look after the birds and 
perpetuate field sports, keeping the state, 
open for all hands, just as the Long 
Island quail clubs keep the quail shoot- 
ing on the island open for everybody. 
Who will look after the grouse properly 
during the" closed season? The foxes, 
hawks, crows, skunks, dogs, cats, and a 
good number of other "varmints," no 
doubt, including some illegal shooters, 
who cannot resist the chance to pot a 
grouse, will keep busy. There is a bet- 
ter . way of preserving field sports and 
game than by turning it over to its 
natural enemies for terms of years. Who 
will purchase guns or ammunition in 
Pennsylvania? Who will purchase bird 
dogs during the closed season? 

Is it not a bad time just now to put 
an end to a desirable food supply and to 
prohibit the production of the food ? All 
clubs and individuals* who have plenty of 
grouse on their places should be excepted 
when the prohibition laws are enacted. 

Ohio State Game Officer. Resigns. 

General. John C. Speaks, State Game 
Warden for Ohio, has resigned and will 
become a candidate for Congress. 'Gen- 
eral Speaks succeeded in getting pheas- 
ant breeding well started in Ohio. There 
are between five hundred and a thousand 
breeders, and we believe the State 
Warden provided eggs and birds for 
many who under a 50-cent license have 
the right to breed, shoot and sell 
pheasants. 

Had the quail been included in the 50- 
cent license, or had the title of the quail 
been transferred to the farmers, quail 
shooting would not have been prohibited 
in Ohio, and we believe the quail could 
be found in the Ohio markets today. 
Since the game is in charge of the Board 
of Agriculture in Ohio it should be an 
easy matter to turn over these birds to 



the farmers and make the birds a farm 
asset, as they should be, and let the 
sportsmen form Shooting clubs to pay 
the farmers' taxes for the right to pro- 
duce and shoot quail on the farms. 
Plans and specifications furnished free 
by The Game Breeder with references 
to farmers in other states who like the 
sportsmen who deal with them. 

Getting Ready for More Laws. 

Mr. V. C. Buell, field secretary of a 
Wisconsin Game Protective Association, 
concludes an appeal for members thus : 
"Send in your club application at your 
earliest convenience. Remember, it is 
numbers that count in legislative mat- 
ters." 

Why go in for more laws when it is 
evident that they do not produce or even 
save quail shooting ? It would be a good 
idea to encourage some game production 
in every county in the state. 

Wisconsin can be made a very fine 
state for prairie grouse shooting, pro- 
vided the farmers and sportsmen will 
work together on a few places and will 
produce the grouse. These are among 
the easiest and'the cheapest birds to pro- 
duce. All that is necessary is to know 
how to do it and to be able to keep out 
of jail for the crime of food production. 
Wisconsin protective associations may 
have a fine time" next Winter getting a 
few dozen or a few score more game 
laws, but in war times at least the sports- 
men should not provide for the arrest 
of food producers. Possibly the Wis- 
consin farmers will wake up. If they 
do they will either put all the farm game 
birds in the song bird list or decide that 
they may be made a valuable farm asset. 

Important New York Law for Breeders 

The following amendment to the New 
York conservation law is in the right 
direction : 

"The commission may also issue a license 
revocable at pleasure to any person, per- 
mitting such person to take and possess any 
species of fish, game birds, quadrupeds or 
aquatic animals, protected by •this chapter, for 
propagation purposes, upon payment of a 
license fee of one dollar. The commission 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 



may, in its discretion, require a bond from 
such person, in such sum as the commission 
may determine, conditioned that he will not 
avail himself of the privileges of said license 
for purposes not herein set forth. 

"The commission may issue permits to 
enable persons to ship fish, game birds, 
quadrupeds or aquatic animals lawfully taken 
and possessed for propagation, scientific or 
educational purposes, under such regulations 
as the commission may prescribe. 

"Fish, game birds, quadrupeds or aquatic 
animals lawfully possessed under this section 
may be sold at any time, by any person re- 
ceiving a license under this section, for 
propagation, scientific, educational or exhibi- 
tion purposes only. 

"Persons receiving a license under this 
section must report the result of operation 
thereunder annually to the commission, at the 
expiration of the license.' Such license shall 
be in force for one year only from the date 
of issue and shall not be transferable." 

Often the Game Breeder has pointed 
out the absurdity of issuing licenses for 
$1 permitting every one to destroy 25 
or 50 game birds in a day while people 
must be arrested and fined $15,000, or 
some other sum, if they should happen 
to take a few game birds alive with the 
intention of breeding large numbers of 
them for sale as food. 

It is interesting to note that for $1 
(same price as killing license) birds may 
be taken alive and preserved. 



More Law for California. 

The farmers of Lower California are 
complaining because the rabbits eat their 
beans. An open season is desired to 
remedy the situation. 

The Field says : 

Early last Fall it was the ducks that were 
doing untold damage to their rice crop and 
they asked an open season on them, and now 
it is the rabbit. All these complaints are re- 
ferred to the Food Administration as the Fish 
•and Game Commission has no power to act, 
.and by the time any relief is afforded the 
rabbits will have gotten through with the 
beans and turned their attention to something 
else, perhaps the truck gardens. At the next 
meeting of the state legislature is the time 
i and place for the rice-growers and .the bean- 
growers to make their complaints and get 
relief— if any relief is really needed. A 
legislature usually has time to look into such 
matters thoroughly and determine to what 
degree the complaints made are justified. 

When we learned that farmers in New 
Mexico complained about the Gambel's 



quail eating their beans we decided to 
plant beans for our Gambel's. With us 
the quail are worth more than beans. 
Why should not a landowner decide 
which crop he wants? We believe with 
a little good farm management he can 
have plenty of beans and plenty of quail 
on the same ground. We shall be pre- 
pared (provided the game police don't 
interfere) to serve beans to any Bos- 
tonian who may visit us and broiled 
quail from the same garden for any 
Missourian who for educational pur- 
poses would like to look in at a dinner 
with both items on the bill. If we must 
give up one it will be the beans. We 
hope if the laws must be so shaped as 
to require our-giving up one of our indus- 
tries it certainly will be the beans. We 
can buy beans cheaper than we are buy- 
ing quail. 

One More New York Law. 

The conservation law recently was 
amended so as to read as follows : 

Wild fowl. Except in counties wholly or 
partly within the forest preserve or on Long 
Island, wild fowl may only be taken with the 
use of a shotgun fired at arm's length. 

This act shall take effect immediately. 

We presume this does not mean that 
only pistols shall be used, as a reader 
suggests. Probably guns held at the 
shoulder are meant. It would be inter- 
esting to know if this law conflicts with 
the law permitting the taking of birds 
for propagation purposes. Birds taken 
with a shotgun fired at. arm's length 
would hardly be useful for food produc- 
ing purposes. 



Something Significant. 

It is significant that the pheasants and 
certain species of wild ducks and deer 
have responded nicely to breeders' laws 
permitting their production and sale in 
the markets and that complaints are com- 
mon that the birds protected against 
breeders are found to need closed sea- 
sons and must be placed on the song bird 
list. ■ 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



168 



THE GAME BREEDER 



THE MIGRATORY BIRD LAW 

T Section 12 of this law is the one which will 
interest the Game Breeders. — Editor.] 

[Public — No. 186 — 65th Congress.] 

[S. 1553.J 

An Act to give effect to the convention 
between 'the United States and Great 
Britain for the protection of migratory 
birds concluded at Washington, August 
sixteenth, nineteen hundred and sixteen, 
and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, That 
this Act shall be known by the short title 
of the "Migratory Bird Treaty Act." 

Sec. 2. That unless and except as per- 
mitted by regulations made as herein- 
after provided, it shall be unlawful to 
hunt, take, capture, kill, attempt to take, 
capture or kill, possess, offer for sale, 
sell, offer to purchase, purchase, deliver 
for shipment, ship, cause to be shipped, 
deliver for transportation, transport, 
cause to be transported, carry or cause to 
be carried by any means whatever, re- 
ceive for shipment, transportation or 
carriage, or export, at any time or in any 
manner, any migratory bird, included in 
the terms of the convention between the 
United States and Great Britain for the 
protection of migratory birds concluded 
August sixteenth, nineteen hundred and 
sixteen, or any part, nest, or egg of any 
such bird. 

Sec. 3. That subject to the provisions 
and in order to carry out the purposes 
of the convention, the Secretary of Agri- 
culture is authorized and directed, from 
time to time, having due regard to the 
zones of temperature and to the distribu- 
tion, abundance, economic value, breed- 
ing habits, and times and lines of migra- 
tory flight of such birds, to determine 
when, to what extent, if at all, and by 
what means, it is compatible with the 
terms of the convention to allow hunt- 
ing, taking, capture, killing, possession, 
sale, purchase, shipment, transportation, 
carriage, or export of any such bird, or 
any part, nest, or egg thereof, and to 
adopt suitable regulations permitting 
and governing the same, in . accordance 
with such determinations, which regula- 
tions shall become effective when ap- 
proved by the President. 



Sec. 4. That it shall be unlawful to 
ship, transport, or carry, by any means 
whatever, from one State, Territory, or 
District to or through another State, 
Territory, or District, or to or through 
a foreign country, any bird, or any part, 
nest, or egg thereof, captured, killed,, 
taken, shipped, transported, or carried 
at any time contrary to the laws of the 
State, Territory, or District in which it 
was captured, killed, or taken, or from 
which it was shipped, transported, or 
carried. It shall be unlawful to import 
any bird, or any part, nest, or egg there- 
of, captured, killed, taken, shipped, 
transported, or carried contrary to the 
laws of any Province of the Dominion of 
Canada in which the same was. captured, 
killed, or taken, or from which it was 
shipped, transported, or carried. 

*Sec. 5. That any employee of the De- 
partment of Agriculture authorized by 
the Secretary of Agriculture to enforce 
the provisions of this Act shall have 
power, without warrant, to arrest any 
person committing a violation of this 
Act in his presence or view and to take 
such person immediately for examina- 
tion or trial before an officer or court of 
competent jurisdiction; shall have power- 
to execute any warrant or other process 
issued by an officer or court of competent 
jurisdiction for the enforcement of the 
provisions of this Act ; and shall have 
authority, with .a search warrant, to 
search any place. The several judges of 
the courts established under the laws of 
the United States, and United States 
commissioners may, within their respect- 
ive jurisdictions, upon proper oath or 
affirmation showing probable cause, is- 
sue warrants in all such cases. All birds, 
or parts, nests, or eggs thereof, captured, 
killed, taken, shipped, transported, car- 
ried, or possessed contrary to the pro- 
visions of this Act or of any regulations 
made pursuant thereto shall, when 
found, be seized by any such employee,, 
or by any marshal or deputy marshal, 
and, upon conviction of the offender or 
upon judgment of a court of the United 
States that the same were captured, 
killed, taken,- shipped, transported, car- 
ried, or possessed contrary to the pro- 
visions of this Act or of any regulation 
made pursuant thereto, shall be forfeited' 






THE GAME BREEDER 



169 



to the United States and disposed of as 
directed by the court having jurisdiction. 

Sec. 6. That any person, association, 
partnership, or corporation who shall 
violate any of the provisions of said 
convention or of this Act, or who shall 
violate or fail to comply with any regu- 
lation made pursuant to this Act, shall 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and 
upon conviction thereof shall be fined 
not more than $500 or be imprisoned 
not more than six months, or both. 

Sec. 7. That nothing in this Act shall 
be construed to prevent the several 
States and Territories from making or 
■enforcing laws or regulations not incon- 
sistent with the provisions of said con- 
vention or of this Act, or from making 
or enforcing laws or regulations which 
shall give further protection to migra- 
tory birds, their nests, and eggs, if such 
laws or regulations do not extend the 
open seasons for such birds beyond the 
dates approved by the President in ac- 
cordance with section three of this Act. 

Sec. 8. That until the adoption and 
approval, pursuant to section three of 
this Act. of regulations dealing with 
migratory birds and their nests and eggs, 
such migratory birds and their nests and 
eggs as are intended and used exclusively 
for scientific or propagating purposes 
may be taken, captured, killed, possessed, 
sold, purchased, shipped, and transported 
for such scientific or propagating pur- 
poses if and to the extent not in conflict 
with the laws of the State, Territory, or 
District in which they are taken, cap- 
tured, killed, possessed, sold, or pur- 
chased, or in or from which they are 
shipped or transported if the packages 
containing the dead bodies or the nests 
or eggs of such birds when shipped and 
transported shall be marked on the out- 
side thereof so as accurately and clearly 
to show the name and address of the 
shipper and the contents of the package. 
Sec. 9. That the unexpended balances 
of any sums appropriated by the agricul- 
tural appropriation Acts for the fiscal 
years nineteen hundred and seventeen 
and nineteen hundred and eighteen, for 
enforcing the provisions of the Act ap- 
proved March fourth, nineteen hundred 
and thirteen, relating to the protection 



of migratory game and insectivorous 
birds, are hereby reappropriated and 
made available until expended for the 
expenses of carrying into effect the pro- 
visions of this Act and regulations made 
pursuant thereto, including the payment 
of such rent, and the employment of 
such persons and means, as the Secre- 
tary of Agriculture may deem necessary, 
in the District of Columbia and else- 
where, co-operation with local authori- 
ties in the protection of migratory birds, 
and necessary investigations connected 
therewith : Provided, That no person 
who is subject to the draft for service 
in the Army or Navy shall be exempted 
or excused from such service by reason 
of his employment undef this Act. 

Sec. 10. That if any clause, sentence, 
paragraph, or part of this Act shall, for 
any reason, be adjudged by any court of 
competent jurisdiction to be invalid, such 
judgment shall not affect, impair, or in- 
validate the remainder thereof, but shall 
be confined in its operation to the clause, 
sentence, paragraph, or part thereof 
directly involved in the controversy in 
which such judgment shall have been 
rendered. 

Sec. 11. That all Acts or parts of Acts 
inconsistent with the provisions of this 
Act are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 12. Nothing in this Act shall be 
construed to prevent the breeding of 
migratory game birds on farms and 
preserves and the sale of birds so bred 
under, proper regulation for the pur- 
pose of increasing the food supply. 

Sec. 13. That this Act shall become 
effective immediately upon its passage 
and approval. 

Approved, July 3, 1918. 

MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY 
ACT REGULATIONS. 

The President's Proclamation. 

Whereas, Section three of the Act of Con- 
gress approved July third, nineteen' hundred 
and eighteen,' entitled "An Act to give effect 
to the convention between the United States 
and Great Britain for the protection of migra- 
tory birds concluded at Washington, August 
sixteenth, nineteen hundred and sixteen, and 
for other purposes" (Public No. 186— 65th 
Congress), provides as follows: 

"That subject to the provisions and in order 



170 



THE GAME BREEDER 



to carry out the purposes of the convention, 
the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized 
and directed, from time to time, having due 
regard to the zones of temperature and to the 
distribution, abundance, economic value, 
breeding habits, and times and lines of 
migratory flight of such birds, to determine 
when, to what extent, if at all, and by what 
means, it is compatible with the terms of the 
convention to allow hunting, taking, capture, 
killing, sale, purchase, shipment, transporta- 
tion, carriage, or export of any such bird, or 
any part, nest, or egg thereof, and to adopt 
suitable regulations permitting and governing 
the same, in accordance with such determina- 
tion's, which regulations shall become- effective 
when approved by the President." 

And, Whereas, The Secretary of Agricul- 
ture, pursuant to said section and having due 
regard to the zones of temperature and to 
the distribution, abundance, economic value, 
breeding habits, and times .and lines of migra- 
tory flight of migratory birds included in the 
terms of the convention between the United 
States and Great Britain for the protection 
of migratory birds concluded August six- 
teenth, nineteen hundred and sixteen, has de- 
termined when, to what extent, and by what 
means it is compatible with the terms of said 
convention to allow hunting, taking, capture, 
killing, possession, sale, purchase, shipment, 
transportation, carriage, and export of such 
birds and parts thereof, and their nests and 
eggs, and in accordance with such determina- 
tions has adopted and submitted to me for 
approval regulations, which the Secretary of 
Agriculture has determined to be suitable 
regulations, permitting and governing hunting, 
taking, capture, killing, possession, sale, pur- 
chase, shipment, transportation, carriage, and 
export of said birds and parts thereof and 
their nests and eggs, which said regulations 
are as follows : 

REGULATIONS, MIGRATORY BIRD 
TREATY ACT. 

Regulation 1 — Definitions of Migratory 
Birds. 

Migratory birds, included in the terms of 
the convention between the United States and 
Great Britain for the protection of migratory 
birds, concluded August 16, 1916, are as fol- 
lows : 

1, Migratory game "birds — 

(a) Anatidae, or waterfowl, including 
brant, wild ducks, geese, and swans. 

(b) Gruidae, or" cranes, including little 
brown, sandhill, and whooping cranes. 

(c) Rallidae, or rails, including coots, gal- 
linules, and sora and other rails. 

(d) Limicolae, or shorebirds, including 
avocets, curlew, dowitchers, godwits, knots, 
oyster catchers, phalaropes, plovers, sand- 
pipers, snipe, stilts, surf birds, turnstones, 
willet, woodcock, and yellowlegs. 

'(e) Columbidae, or pigeons, including doves 
and wild pigeons. 



2. Migratory insectivorous birds — Bobo- 
links, catbirds, chickadees, cuckoos, nickers, 
flycatchers, grosbeaks,, hummingbirds, kinglets, 
martins,- meadowlarks, nighthawks or bull- 
bats, nuthatches, orioles, robins, shrikes,, 
swallows, swifts, tanagers, titmice, thrushes, 
vireos, warblers, waxwings, whip-poor-wills, 
woodpeckers, and wrens, and all other perch- 
ing birds which feed entirely or chiefly on 
insects. 

3. Other migratory nongame birds — -Auks, 
auklets, bitterns, fulmars, gannets, grebes, 
guillemots, gulls, herons, jaegers, loons,. 
murres, petrels, puffins, shearwaters, and terns. 

Regulation 2 — Definitions of Terms. 

For the purposes of these regulations the 
following terms shall be construed, respect- 
ively, to mean — 

Secretary — The Secretary of Agriculture of 
the United States. 

Person — The plural or the singular, as the 
case demands, including individuals, associa- 
tions, partnerships, and corporations, unless 
the context otherwise requires. 

Take— The pursuit, hunting, capture, or 
killing of migratory birds in the manner and 
by the means specifically permitted. 

Open season — The time during which 
migratory birds may be taken. 

Transport — Shipping, transporting, carrying, 
exporting, receiving or. delivering for ship- 
ment, transportation, carriage, or export. 
Regulation 3 — Means by Which Migratory 
Game Birds May Be Taken. 

The migratory game birds specified in Reg- 
ulation 4 hereof may be taken during the open 
season with a gun only, not larger than num- 
ber ten gauge, fired from the shoulder, except 
as specifically permitted by Regulations 7, 8, ' 
9 and 10 hereof; they may be taken during 
the open season from the land and water, 
from a blind or floating device (other than* 
an airplane, powerboat, sailboat, or any boat 
under sail), with the aid of a dog, and, the 
use of decoys. 

Regulation A — Open Seasons . on and Pos- 
session of Certain Migratory Game 
Birds. 

For the purpose of this regulation, each 
period of time herein prescribed as an open 
season shall be construed to include the first 
and last days thereof. 

Waterfowl (except wood duck, eider ducks, 
and swans), rails, coot, gallinules, black- 
bellied and golden plovers, greater and lesser 
yellowlegs, woodcock, Wilson snipe or jack- 
snipe, and mourning and white-winged doves, 
may be taken each day from half an hour 
before sunrise to sunset during the dpen 
seasons prescribed therefor in this regulation, 
by the means and in the numbers permitted 
by Regulations 3 and 5 hereof, respectively, 
and when so taken, each species may be 
possessed any day during the respective open 
seasons herein prescribed therefor and for an 



THE GAME BREEDER 



171 



additional period of ten days next succeeding 
said open season. 

Waterfowl (except zvood duck, eider ducks, 
and S7vans) , co.ot, gallinules, and Wilson 
snipe or jacksnipe — The open seasons for 
waterfowl (except wood duck, eider ducks, 
and swans), coot, gallinules, and Wilson snipe 
or jacksnipe shall be as follows : 

In Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, New York (except Long 
Island), Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, 
Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Illinois, Minnesota', Iowa, Missouri,' North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, 
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, 
and that portion of Oregon and Washington 
lying east of the summit of the Cascade 
Mountains the open season shall ' be from 
September 16 to December 31. 

In Rhode Island, Connecticut, Utah, and 
that portion of Oregon and Washington lying 
west of the summit of the Cascade Mountains 
the open season shall be from October 1 to 
January IS. 

In that portion of New York known as 
Long Island, and in New Jersey, Delaware, 
Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and 
California the open season shall be from 
October 16 to January 31. 

In Maryland, the District of Columbia, 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Ten- 
nessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana the open 
season shall be from November 1 to January 
31. 

In Alaska the open season shall be from 
September 1 to December 15. 

Rails (except coot and gallinules) — The 
open season for sora and other rails (except 
coot and gallinules) shall be from September 
1 to November 30, except as follows : 

In Louisiana the open season shall be from 
November 1 to January 31. 

Black-bellied and golden plovers and 
greater and lesser yellowlegs — The open sea- 
sons for black-bellied and golden plovers and 
greater and lesser yellowlegs shall be as fol- 
lows : 

In Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New 
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia the 
open season shall be from August 16 to 
November 30. 

In the District of Columbia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Okla- 
homa, New Mexico, Arizona, California, and 
Alaska the open season shall be from Sep- 
tember 1 to December 15. 

In 'Vermont, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West 
Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Wis- 
consin, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, 
Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, 
Nevada, and that portion of Oregon and 
Washington lying east of the summit of the 



Cascade Mountains the open season shall be 
from September 16 to December 31. 

In Utah and in that portion of Oregon and 
Washington lying west of the summit of the 
Cascade Mountains the open season shall be 
from October 1 to January 15. 

In Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, 
Louisiana, and Texas the open season shall 
be from November 1 to January 31. 

Woodcock — The open .seasons for wood- 
cock shall be as follows : 

In Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, 
New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, 
Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and 
Kansas the open season shall be from Octo- 
ber 1 to November 30. 

In Delaware, Maryland, the District of 
Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Missis- 
sippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, 
and Oklahoma the open season shall be from 
November 1 to December 31. 

Doves — The open seasons for mourning and 
white-winged doves shall be as follows : 

In Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Tennes- 
see, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma, 
Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Cali- 
fornia, Nevada, Idaho, and Oregon the open 
season shall be from September 1 to Decem- 
ber 15. 

In North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana 
the open season shall be from September 16 
to December 31. 
Regulation 5 — Bag Limits on Certain 

Migratory Game Birds. 

A person may take in any one day during 
the open seasons prescribed' therefor in Reg- 
ulation 4 not to exceed the following numbers 
of migratory game birds : 

Ducks (except wood duck and eider ducks) 
— Twenty-five in the aggregate of all kinds. 

Geese — Eight in the aggregate of all kinds. 

Brant — Eight. 

Rails, coot, and gallinules — Twenty-five in 
the aggregate of all kinds. 

Black-bellied and golden plovers and 
greater and lesser yellowlegs — Fifteen in the 
aggregate of all kinds. 

Wilson snipe, or jacksnipe — Twenty-five. 

Woodcock — Six. 

Doves (mourning and zvhite -winged) — 
Twenty-five in the aggregate of both kinds. 
Regulation 6 — Shipment and Transporta- 
tion of Certain Migratory Game Birds. 

Waterfowl (except wood duck, eider ducks, 
and swans), rails, coot, gallinules, black- 
bellied and golden plovers, greater and lesser 
yellowlegs, woodcock, Wilson snipe' or jack- 
snipe, and mourning and white-winged doves 
and parts thereof legally taken may be trans- 



172 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ported in or out of the State where taken 
during the respective open seasons in that 
State, and may be imported from Canada 
during the open seasons in the Province 
where taken, in any manner, but not more by 
one person in one calendar week than the 
number that may be taken under these regula- 
tions in two days by one person ; any such 
migratory game birds or parts thereof in 
transit during the open season may continue 
in transit such additional time immediately 
succeeding such open season, not to exceed 
five days, necessary to deliver the same to 
their destination ; and any package in which 
migratory game birds or parts thereof are 
transported shall have the name and address 
of the shipper and of the consignee and an 
accurate statement of the numbers and kinds 
of birds contained therein clearly and con- 
spicuously marked on the outside thereof; 
but no such birds shall be transported from 
any State, Territory, or District to or through' 
another State, Territory, or District, or to or 
through a Province of the Dominion of 
Canada contrary to the laws of the State, 
Territory, or District, or Province of the 
Dominion of Canada in which they were 
taken or from which they are transported; 
nor shall any such birds be transported into 
any State. Territory, or District from another 
State, Territory, or District, or from any 
State, Territory, or District into any Province 
of the Dominion of Canada at a time when 
such State, Territory, or District, or Province 
of the_ Dominion of Canada prohibits the 
possession or transportation thereof. 
Regulation 7— Taking of Certain Migra- 
tory Nongame Birds by Eskimos and 
Indians in Alaska. 
In Alaska Eskimos and Indians may take 
for the use of themselves and their immediate 
families, in any manner and at any time, and 
possess and transport auks, auklets, guille- 
mots, murres, and puffins and their eggs for 
food, and their skins for clothing. 
Regulation 8 — Permits to Propagate and 
Sell Migratory Waterfowl. 

1. A person may take in any manner and 
at any time migratory waterfowl and their 
eggs for propagating purposes when author- 
ized by a permit issued by the Secretary. 
Waterfowl and their eggs so taken may be 
possessed by the permittee and may be sold 
and transported by him for propagating pur- 
poses to any person holding a permit issued 
by the Secretary in accordance with the pro- 
visions of this regulation. 

2. A person authorized by a permit issued 
by the Secretary may possess, buy, sell, and 
transport migratory waterfowl and their in- 
crease and eggs in any manner and at any 
time for propagating purposes ; and migra- 
tory waterfowl, except the birds taken under 
paragraph 1 of this regulation, so possessed 
MAY BE KILLED BY HIM IN ANY 
MANNER EXCEPT BY SHOOTING, 
and the unplucked carcasses and the plucked 



carcasses with heads attached thereto of the 
birds so killed may be sold and transported 
by him in any manner and at any time to any 
person for actual consumption, or to the 
keeper of a hotel, restaurant, or boarding 
house, retail dealer in meat or game, or a 
club, for sale or service to their patrons, who 
may possess such carcasses for actual con- 
sumption without a permit. 

■ 3. Any package in which such waterfowl 
or parts thereof or their eggs are transported 
shall have plainly and conspicuously marked 
on the outside thereof the name and address 
of the permittee, the number of his permit, 
the name and address of the consignee, and 
an accurate statement of the number and 
kinds of birds or eggs contained therein. 

4. Applications for permits must be ad- 
dressed to the Secretary of Agriculture, 

. Washington, D. C, and must contain the fol- 
lowing information : Name and address of 
applicant ; place where the business is to be 
carried on; number of acres of land used in 
the business and whether owned or leased by 
the applicant; number of each species of 
waterfowl in possession of applicant; name 
of species and number of birds or eggs of 
each species if permission is asked to take 
waterfowl or their eggs; and the particular 
locality where it is desired to take such water- 
fowl or eggs. 

5. A person granted a permit under this 
regulation shall keep books and records which 
shall correctly set forth the total number of 
each species of waterfowl and their eggs 
possessed on the date of application for the 
permit and on the first day of January next 
following; also for the calendar year for 
which permit was issued the total number of 
each species reared and killed, number of each 
species and their eggs sold and transported, 
manner in which such waterfowl and eggs 
were transported, name and address of each 
person from or to whom waterfowl and eggs 
were purchased or sold, together with num- 
ber and species and whether sold alive or 
dead ; and the date of each transaction. A 
written report correctly setting forth this in- 
formation shall be furnished the Secretary 
during the month of January next following 
the issuance of the permit. 

6. A permittee shall at all reasonable 
hours allow any authorized employee of the 
United States Department of Agriculture to 
enter and inspect the premises where opera- 
tions are being carried on under this regula- 
tion and to inspect the books and records of 
such permittee relating thereto. 

7. Permits issued under this regulation 
shall be valid only during the calendar year 
of issue, shall not be transferable, and may 
be revoked by the Secretary, if the permittee 
violates' any of the provisions of the Migra- 
tory . Bird Treaty Act or of the regulations 
thereunder. 

8. A person engaged in the propagation 
of migratory waterfowl on the date on which 



THE GAME BREEDER 



173 



these regulations become effective will be al- 
lowed until September 30, 1918, to apply for 
the permit required by this regulation, but 
he shall not take any migratory waterfowl 
without a permit. 

Regulation 9 — Permits to Collect Migra- 
tory Birds for Scientific Purposes. 

A person may take in any manner and at 
any time migratory birds and their nests and 
eggs for scientific purposes when authorized 
by a permit issued by the Secretary, which 
permit shall be carried on his person when 
he is collecting specimens thereunder and 
shall be exhibited to any person requesting 
to see the same. 

Application for a permit must be addressed 
to the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C.j and must contain the following in- 
formation: Name and address of applicant 
»and name of State, Territory, or District in 
which specimens are proposed to be taken and 
the purpose for which they are intended. 
Each application shall be accompanied by cer- 
tificates from two well-known ornithologists 
that the applicant is a fit person to be en- 
trusted with a permit. 

The permit will authorize the holder there- 
of to possess, buy, sell, and transport in any 
manner and at any time migratory birds, 
parts thereof, and their nests and eggs for 
scientific purposes. Public museums, zoo- 
logical parks and societies, and public scien- 
tific and educational institutions may possess, 
buy, sell, and transport in any manner and 
at any time migratory birds and parts thereof, 
and their nests and eggs for scientific pur- 
poses without a permit, but no specimens 
shall be taken without a permit. 

Permits shall be valid only during the' 
calendar year of issue, shall not be transfer- 
able, and shall be revocable in the discretion 
of the Secretary. A person holding a permit 
shall report to the Secretary on or before 
January 10 following its expiration the num- 
ber of skins, nests, or eggs of each species 
^ collected, bought, sold, or transported. 
Every package in which migratory birds 
or their nests or eggs are transported shall 
have clearly and conspicuously marked on 
the outside thereof the name and address of 
the sender, the number of the permit in every 
case when a permit is required, the name and 
address of the consignee, a statement that it 
contains specimens of birds, their nests, or 
eggs for scientific purposes, and, whenever 
such a package is transported or offered for 

* transportation from the Dominion of Canada 
into the United States or from the United 
States into the Dominion of Canada, an ac- 
curate statement of the contents. 

Regulation 10 — Permits to Kill Migratory 
Birds Injurious to Property. 

When information is furnished the Secre- 

»tary that any species of migratory bird has 
become, under extraordinary conditions, 
seriously injurious to agricultural or other 
interests in any particular community, an in- 
vestigation will be made to determine the 
nature and extent of the injury, whether the 



birds alleged to be doing the damage should 
be killed, and, if so, during what times and 
by what means. Upon his determination an 
appropriate order will be made. 
• Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, 
President of the United States of America, 
do hereby approve and proclaim the forego- 
ing regulations. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States of America to be affixed. 

Done in the District of Columbia, 
this thirty-first day of July, in 
the year of our Lord, One Thou- 
(Seal) sand, Nine Hundred and Eight- 
een, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America 
the One Hundred and Forty- 
Third. 

WOODROW WILSON. 
By the President, 
Frank L. Polk, 

Acting Secretary of State. 

Readers will observe that the "other- 
wise than by shooting" man got his 
work in when Paragraph 2 of Section 
8 above was written. We keep a car- 
toon in stock showing a sportsman 
killing a wild duck with a hatchet. 
This was effectively used to take the 
"otherwise than by shooting" nonsense 
out of state laws. We will spring the 
picture again if necessary, but the reg- 
ulations we hope will be amended 
without further notice. The shooting 
clubs are the best customers for game 
farmers and breeders. Shooting also 
is the main inducement to production. 
Darwin tells us shooting causes the 
abundance of game. Why stop it ? 



[Sample form of application for a permit 
to trap wild fowl. To obtain this form write 
to the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C. Our advertisers can attend to the 
trapping and will procure permits and furnish 
birds, no doubt. If you intend to shoot and 
sell the game produced mention this fact on 
the application and refuse the permit unless 
shooting be permitted.] 

United States Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Biological Survey.. 
APPLICATION FOR A PERMIT TO 
TAKE, POSSESS, BUY, SELL, AND 
TRANSPORT MIGRATORY WATER- 
FOWL AND THEIR EGGS FOR 
PROPAGATING PURPOSES. 
The Secretary of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: 

I, • , the undersigned, 

do hereby make application for a permit to 
take, possess, buy, sell, and transport migra- 
tory waterfowl -and their eggs for propagat- 



174 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ihg purposes in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Regulation 8 of the Migratory 
Bird Treaty Act Regulations, and, as required 
by said Regulation, do furnish the following 
information : 

. My full name is 

My residence and postoffice address is 



The names of the species and the number 
of birds and eggs of each I desire to take 
are as* follows : 



The particular locality where' I desire to 
take such waterfowl and eggs is as follows : 

I agree that if said permit is issued I will 
comply with all the provisions of the Migra- 
tory Bird Treaty Act and Regulations there- 
under. 

Dated at 

this. day of 



1918. 



State of ) 

County of j SS- ' 

, of being 

duly sworn, deposes and says that he is the 
person mentioned in and who subscribed to 
the foregoing application; that he has read 
the same and knows the contents thereof ; 
and that the facts therein stated are true of 
his own knowledge. 



Name of applicant. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 
day of 1918 



Name of officer. 
Title of officer. 



Name of applicant. 



SUGGESTION FOR NOTE IN 
APPLICATION. 
"It is the applicant's intention to shoot the 
wild fowl produced, and since many will be 
shot which cannot be eaten on the premises, 
these will be sold as food. If most of the 
birds shot must be wasted we would prefer 
not to have any permit, but to continue , as 
we now are." 



THE GOLDEN PHEASANT. 

By W. Sinclair. 



[Mr. Sinclair's story about his methods of 
rearing the Golden Pheasants was written 
for Thompsons' Natural History of Ireland. 
We are sure it will interest our readers, 
many of whom rear golden pheasants for 
their aviaries and for sale.] 

Golden Pheasants are very easily 
reared in confinement, and are quite as 
hardy as any of the other pheasants, or 
as any of our domestic fowls; indeed, I 
question if any of them are sooner able 
to provide a subsistence for themselves, 
or to live independent of the parent bird. 
In the several years' experience I have 
had in the rearing of these birds, I have 
considered them past all danger when 
they arrived at the age of three or four 
weeks*? in f act ,♦ at that age those which I 
brought up in the garden began to leave 
the bantam hen which hatched them and 
take to the gooseberry bushes to perch at 
night, and very soon after to the apple 
trees. I always observed that they roost- 
ed at the extremity of the branches, 
where they were quite safe from the at- 
tacks of cats or other vermin. This 



habit, together with their very early dis- 
position to roost at night, leads me to 
infer that their introduction into this 
country as a game bird would not be 
difficult ; and that in our large demesnes, 
where protected from shooters, .they 
would become very numerous. But I 
should imagine that they would not 
answer where the common pheasants 
were already introduced, as they are shy, 
timid birds, and would be easily driven 
off by the other species. The individuals 
before referred to, which were reared in 
the garden, consisted of a family of six ; 
they always remained in the garden, 
where they' were regularly fed, except 
at the commencement of winter, when 
they ceased roosting in the apple trees, 
took to a belt of Scotch firs which 
bounded the garden on one side, and 
roosted in them all the winter and fol- 
lowing spring. I have seen them sitting 
in the trees when the branches were 
laden with snow, but they did not seem 
to suffer in the slightest degree from the 
severity of winter. About the month of 



THE GAME BREEDER 



175 



February they first began to wander 
from the garden for short distances, 
and; as the spring advanced, finally dis- 
appeared, and I never could hear of 
their being met with afterwards. 

In rearing the young I found that the 
very best food for them, and of which 
they were most fond, was the larvae of 
the bluebottle fly, with a quantity of 
which I always was prepared prior to 
the young being hatched. ' I took care . 
to have a constant supply during the sea- 
son by hanging a cow's liver over a bar- 
rel, in the bottom of which was some 
bran or sawdust, into which the maggots 
dropped. A fresh liver was hung up 
about once a week. In addition to these 
larvae, the young were supplied with 
potatoes, alum curd, groats, and Indian 
corn meal; this last I found they were 
very fond of, and it seemed to agree with 
them particularly well. It was mixed 
into the form of soft dough with a little 
water, which was all that was required. 
They were also constantly supplied with 
green food, such as lettuce, when they 
were in the aviary. But -the best way 
is to have a coop, railed in front, into 
which they are put with the hen twenty- 
four hours after they are hatched. This 
coop should be placed upon a gravel walk 
as near to the windows of the house as 
possible, so that they may always be 
within observation ; a small verdure gar- 
den is the best possible locality, as the 
young have plenty of range, with shelter 
under the bushes from both sun and rain. 
In this instance, which I have already 
alluded to, the hen was allowed to range 
about six feet from the coop, by means 
of a small cord attached to a leather 
strap round one of her legs, and the other 
end tied to the coop ; the young pheasants 
never wandered far from the hen, and 
always came into the coop to remain with 
her at night. In front of each coop a 
small frame was put down, boxed round 
on three sides, without a bottom, and 
railed at top ; the open side was put close 
to the coop, and the young birds could 
run through the rails of the coop into the 
enclosed space, and were safe from the 
night attacks of cats, rats, etc. This 
frame was always kept before the coops 
•for the first few days after the young 
were hatched, and until they became ac- 



quainted with the call of the hen. When 
. I first began to rear young pheasants I 
could not at all account for" their seem- 
ingly foolish manner for the first two or 
three days after being hatched; they 
would run gaping about without appear- 
ing to notice the hen or her calls to 
them to come for food. The reason of 
this I afterwards believed to have been 
owing to their ignorance of the language 
of their foster-mother, which it took 
some time for them to understand ; dur- 
ing this process it is necessary to keep 
them confined within the frame before 
their coops, as, were they to wander a 
few yards from the hen, they would not 
heed her call, and would inevitably 
perish. 

When three or four weeks old, it is 
necessary, if reared for the aviary, to 
pinion them, which is done by cutting 
off rather more than the first joint of the 
wing, having previously, by means of a 
needle and thread, inserted close to the 
small wing-bone, and brought round the 
large one, just within the skin, taking 
up the main blood vessels ; the piece of 
the wing is then chopped off on a block.. 
There is no loss of blood, and I never 
could observe that the birds seemed to 
suffer in the slightest degree afterwards, 
. although the operation, I dare say, was 
painful enough. My reason for taking 
off rather more than the first joint of 
the wing was because I found that if only 
the first joint was taken off the birds 
were always able, when grown up, to get 
out of the aviary, which was about 12 
feet high, and I found it 'thus requisite 
to take off so much as to render them 
incapable of any attempt at flying; but I 
left enough remaining to enable them to 
reach their roosting-place at night. I 
furnished them with a kind of ladder by 
nailing cross-pieces of wood on a long 
piece about 3 inches wide, and which they 
very soon learned to walk up and down 
with facility. One aviary in which I 
kept some had a back wall to it covered 
with old ivy, and they preferred roosting 
in this ; indeed, I always found that, al- 
though during a wet day those which 
were at liberty took shelter under a roof, 
yet at night they would not do so, but 
would instead roost in the open air. The 
females will lay about twenty-five eggs 



176 



THE GAME BREEDER 



each in the aviary. I always provided 
them with baskets to lay in, which they 
only sometimes made use of ; they take 
twenty-four days to hatch. The young 
cocks do* not attain their full plumage 
until after the moult of the second sum- 
mer; they drop their chicken feathers 
when about three months old; their 
plumage is then something like the hen's-, 
but sufficiently bright in some parts as 
easily to distinguish them from the young 
females. In general there are more 
cocks than hens. 

If the cock birds are placed in a por- 
tion of the aviary apart from the hens, 
any number may be kept together. I 
have had as many as twelve males in full 
plumage together, and when during the 



summer (and indeed at all times,) these, 
beautiful birds were going through the 
very curious and fanciful attitudes and 
manoeuvres peculiar to them, it was one 
of the most brilliant sights to be ob- 
served in nature. The flashing of their 
various golden, crimson, blue, and purple 
plumes in different lights was absolutely 
dazzling to the eye, and at these times 
they contrive to display all the most 
beautiful parts of their plumage to the 
utmost advantage ; the golden crest is 
raised, the splendid orange and purple 
tipped collar is spread out to its full ex- 
tent, while the scarlet tail coverts are 
shown in all their beauty. During the 
whole time the birds are leaping and 
dancing around each other, and uttering 
occasionally their peculiar shrill cry. 



COURT MADE LAW AND HOW TO TRAP WILD DUCKS. 



'-tdt !• 

■ Some reflections of the editor on this s 

''abundance in general; the foreign freedom i 

: for the markets by. gunners by no means ri 

p-ublic waters which are especially important 

tp, trap all species of migratory fowl for sto 

the Congress was told that we don't want i 

new law-makers or regulation-makers think 

"and the sale of game as food" which goes 

be popular. 

Mr. Burnham's statement to the 
United States Congressional committee 
that the American game law was made 
by the courts must have seemed amusing 
and peculiar to the lawmakers who 
know, of course, that the courts have 
no authority to make laws and have re- . 
peatedly said so. 

We quoted in our July issue Mr. 
Burnham's remarks as officially reported 
and printed in the record of the hearing. 
He said : 

"Our law has been made, of course, con- 
siderably since that time (the time of the 
American Revolution) by the courts. Ac- 
cording to the American law — court made — 
the game is the property of the state, held 

in trust for all of the people We 

do not want to adopt the European p'reserve 
system ; we do no't want to adopt the sale of 
game which goes with it." 

The courts, as we understand the mat- 
ter, have no power to make laws. Re- 
peatedly they have said, when called 



pecies of law and on game laws and game 
n the matter of shooting migratory wild ducks 
ch, and the methods of trapping the birds on 
and timely now that it has just become legal 
eking the game farms and preserves, which 
n America. Fortunately the Congress and the 
we do want some game farms and preserve; 
with them. Food production just now shoulc 



upon to pass upon laws which seemed to 
create hardships and wrongs, that they 
must decide the matters in controversy 
according to the laws made by the law- 
makers. The remedy must be sought by 
amendments to the laws (which only 
could be made by the legislature) and 
not by appeals to the courts to change 
or amend the laws. 

Courts can only interpret ; they cannot 
make or even amend the laws. It is true 
that the courts have decided that at the 
common or unwritten law, wild creatures 
are owned by the people in common be- 
cause they have no other owner. This 
idea is of great antiquity and may be 
found in the old Roman law. Under 
this ancient law, however, any one who 
by his industry captured alive or killed 
a wild animal at once became the owner 
of it and could do with it as he pleased. 
Any one who produced one owned it, of 






THE GAME BREEDER 



177 



course, because of his industry. He 
could sell it alive to a zoo if it happened 
to be a lion or other animal suitable for 
exhibition. He could sell it for breed- 
ing purposes or for food provided the 
animal be edible. 

Game abundance as food has 'been 
brought about by an intelligent handling 
of the subject by legislators in the older 
countries. It is the law in England to- 
day that any one who shoots a wild 
migratory food bird during a long open 
season owns the bird after he has shot 
it, and if he shoots more than he can 
eat he can sell his game in the markets. 
If any one traps wild ducks or other 
migratory fowl he can wring their necks 
and send the birds to market. The re- 
sult is the people who are said to own 
the game have plenty of their property 
to eat at prices, as Mr. Burnham ad- 
mitted, cheaper than ordinary poultry. 
His statement that 'the shooting in 
England is only for the rich was en- 
tirely erroneous since there are many 
thousands of people in England, known 
as wild fowlers (market gunners we call 
them in the United States), who make a 
living shooting and trapping migratory 
wild fowl for the markets. 

Captain Aymer Maxwell, an authority 
on shooting in England, after describing 
the elaborate traps, or "decoys" as they 
are called, used for trapping thousands 
of wild ducks for the markets, says : 

"After all the ingenuity that has been ex- 
pended on the making of duck decoys,* in- 
tricate in design, costly to construct and 
maintain, it is interesting to find that wild 
duck may be caught by far easier means. 
Hard by the fine duck decoy at Netherly, 



carefully planned with its seven pipes of 
approved pattern, there stands an unpreten- 
tious wire cage, which anyone could knock 
together in an hour, using no more costly 
material than a few bits of wood, a strip of 
wire netting, hammer and nails. One side of 
this simple pen lifts up and a cylinder of wire 
netting, open at both ends and wide enough 
to allow free passage to a duck, lies on the 
ground, leading from the open side to the 
center of the pen. For ten days or so the 
ducks feed gloriously in the open pen work- 
ing all around and through the cylinder ; then 
the open side is let down, covering all but the 
opening of this tube. With evening comes 
the flight of ducks; they have been used to 
passing through the innocent looking tube of 
wire netting with impunity, and soon the pen 
is full. When, however, they wish to depart, 
to look for an exit in the center of the pen 
never seems to occur to them, and they 
wander disconsolately up and down the walls 
of their prison, until with morning comes Mr. 
Bell, duck keeper at Netherby and originator 
of this ingenious device, to count his captives, 
cut the wings of those who are to be given 
their lives, and alas ! to wring the necks of 
the rest, whose ignominious end is a prelude 
to their appearance in the market." 

Captain Oates, in an excellent little 
book on wild ducks, describes another 
trap for wild ducks which is used in 
England. This is a very simple wire 
cage built partly in and partly out of 
the water; the front is a sliding door. 
When this is raised tame decoys are fed 
in the cage, and when these come to be 
fed the wild ducks follow them into the 
inclosure. An attendant, in ambush 
near by, pulls a string, releasing the front 
of the cage ; this falls and all the wild 
ducks within are caught. 



* The duck decoy is described in the book, 
"Our Wild Fowl and Waders." 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Shipping Eggs. 

There have been some complaints 
about eggs not hatching after they were 
shipped. This has resulted in some of 
the dealers deciding not to deal in eggs. 
Two have informed us they would not 
ship any more eggs. 

One shipment to the Long Island 
Game Breeders' Association turned out 



very badly. Other shipments to the 
same place turned out very well. We all 
know that eggs laid on the ground where 
the birds are to be reared are the most 
desirable, but many people decide to rear 
more birds than they can from their own 
eggs, and they must either purchase eggs 
or one day old birds. We believe the 
egg business will increase rapidly in 



178 



THE GAME BREEDER 



America and that soon it will be as big 
a business or bigger than it is in any 
country in the world. We are inclined to 
think there will be more pheasants and 
wild ducks sold in America than are sold 
in all the Continental European countries 
in a very few years if the game breed- 
ing industry continues to grow as it now 

is growing. 

♦ 

One Day Old Chicks. 

The Game Conservation Society con- 
tinuing its experiments with one day 
old wild ducks and pheasants has been 
very successful in proving that the one 
day old birds travel nicely both by ex- 
press and in the mails. We would ad- 
vise the few dealers who have decided 
to discontinue the sale of eggs because 
of numerous complaints to advertise and 
sell one day old birds. One great diffi- 
culty in America is the want of skilled 
labor, but this will be overcome when 
mpre under keepers are employed on 
places where the head keeper is skillful 
and takes an • interest in showing his 
helpers how to do things properly. Since 
millions of one day old poultry chicks 
are sold and shipped by mail annually in 
America we believe it will not be long 
before many rural residents learn how 
to handle one day old pheasants, wild 
ducks, quail and other game birds. 

Since many thousands of game birds 
are now produced every season from 
purchased eggs we feel sure that the fail- 
ures will not put an end to the safes and 
shipping of eggs. Soon the places where 
they can be procured will be so numerous 
that it will not be necessary to ship eggs 
long distances. 



Hungarian Partridges. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

May I ask a little information about 
Hungarian partridges ? Are they as easy 
to raise as ring-necked pheasants? Are 
they as good a bird for the table as the 
pheasant ? 

California. E. H. Moulton. 

The methods of rearing pheasants and 
partridges are entirely different in Eng- 



land and the countries of Continental 
Europe where both birds are abundant. 
Usually the pheasants are hand-reared by 
methods with which no doubt you are fa- 
miliar. This often has been ■ compared 
with poultry rearing. The partridges 
usually are reared in a wild state on 
fields made safe and attractive, that is to 
say, fields where hedges and other suit- 
able covers and some natural foods are 
planted when the natural growths are not 
sufficient to make the fields as attractive 
as they should be. Tens of thousands 
of partridges are reared on some of the 
Hungarian farms where corn and wheat 
or other small grain are planted in al- 
ternating strips. The corn makes good 
cover and shade and the birds find wheat 
and other small grains in the stubbles 
after the. harvest. The birds are fed 
some in the winter and beat keepers 
patrol the fields at all seasons and shoot 
and trap the vermin. In the absence of 
natural enemies the birds quickly can be 
made tremendously abundant on suitable 
areas. In a story, . written by an Eng- 
lish Army officer, describing the shoot- 
ing in Hungary which we published, the 
writer said the birds came out of the 
corn in great swarms ; their numbers 
were positively bewildering. 

The beat keepers being only required 
to patrol the fields and shoot and trap 
vermin and look out for poachers, they 
are not required to have the skill re- 
quired of the keepers who hand rear 
pheasants and they receive, we believe, 
somewhat lower wages than the more 
skilled men receive. You will observe 
that partridges reared in this way (the 
old birds rearing the young in safe 
places) should be easier to rear than 
hand reared pheasants are. 

In some places in England and other, 
countries a few .partridges are penned 
and sometimes a few eggs are lifted and 
hatched under hens, but this»is only sup- 
plemental to the general wild breeding 
on the place and it is quite unusual on 
large places. When partridges are 
penned for- safety the birds as they pair 
off are permitted to go into smaller pens 
or cages at the sides of the large enclo- 
sure and there hatch their eggs, the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



179 



old bird and brood being liberated. This 
is known as the French system, and we 
have printed several articles about it. 

We regard the partridge as fully as . 
good for the table as the pheasant; if 
anything somewhat better, and we be- 
lieve this is the opinion of sportsmen 
in the older countries. 

Our bobwhite quail or partridge we 
regard as better for sport and fully as 
good as, if not better than, the foreign 
birds on the table. The quails can be 
made to swarm on protected areas which 
are safe and attractive, provided the beat 
keepers are diligent and faithful. * Their 
work is much more difficult in America 
than it is in the older countries because 
the vermin is more abundant here than 
there, and as a rule the keepers have no 
assistance from keepers on adjoining 
places. We have observed in places 
where briar patches are abundant at the 
sides of fields that many birds escape the 
vermin, but to get the best results sev- 
eral keepers should be on a large place 
at all times; — 1,200 to 1,500 acres is al- 
lotted to a keeper in the older countries 
usually. In America a keeper should 
have charge of a smaller area because 
the work is more difficult than it is in 
countries where the neighbors look after 
the. stray cats and the wilder vermin. 

There are places in America where 
thousands of quail are safely shot every 
season, but some of these places could be 
made to yield even more abundantly pro- 
vided more keepers be employed. Of 
course since no birds can be sold alive 
or dead and more are shot in some cases 
than the shooters know what to do with, 
there is no necessity or de-sire to go in 
for bigger results. 

The hand rearing of quail, like the 
hand rearing of partridges, is far more 
difficult than pheasant rearing is, and 
since there is an easier and a better way 
we long have believed that the hand rear- 
ing of quail should not be relied on to 
produce any big results, but that the 
cheaper and simpler methods should be 
adopted. Some hand rearing for experi- 
mental purposes and to supplement the 
wild breeding operations is interesting 
and somewhat helpful in some places, 



but an abundance of quail quickly can 
be produced in a wild state and this we 
regard as the right method for making 
and keeping the quail plentiful. 



More Pheasants. 

The American Field quotes a Niagara 
County, N. Y., farmer as saying: "I in- 
tend to shoot every pheasant I find de- 
stroying my crops in the future." 

In England, where the small farmers, 
as well as the big ones, own the game on 
their places, the damage to crops is 
easily prevented by the use of scare boys 
at certain short seasons when damage 
may occur. It pays, of course, to look 
after the game. The American farmer 
hardly can be expected to encourage 
game to destroy his crops in the hope 
that later in the season a horde of 
licensed trespassers will come to his re- 
lief and shoot up his place, "killing poul- 
try and wounding horses and cattle in 
the fields," as we once heard a rural 
Senator say when describing field sports 
of today. The wonder is that the game 
birds have not been made singers on 
larger areas than they have. Shooting 
has been prohibited on a much larger 
area in the United States than the entire 
area of all of the British Isles, and the 
idea of stopping field sports will spread 
quickly in the agricultural states if the 
farmers' interests be not considered in 
our future game law making. 



Experiment with Prairie Grouse. 

G. F. Johnson. 

I have tried hatching several settings 
of prairie chicken eggs this summer un- 
der bantam hens. The eggs hatch. But 
the problem is to keep them with the 
hen. They all died or ran away and 
got lost. I had one bantam setting on 
twelve eggs and when they were about 
ready to hatch I put them under a three- 
fourths wild turkey hen that had set 
along a fence on the edge of a wheat 
field. The turkey hen .hatched every egg. 
About twenty-four hours after they were 
hatched the hen was getting along fine 
with them. After that she went out in 



180 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the wheat field and I did not see her 
again until they were about four weeks 
old. I tried to take a picture of them, 
• but she was too wild and the chickens 
\v"Ould not come out of the grain. Now I 
am unable to get within a quarter of a 
mile of her before she hides. 1 am afraid 
I will not be able to catch them. 1 was 
in hopes she would come up near the 
. building after the grain is cut. They 
are now so large that they can fly two 
miles and I am afraid to disturb them too 
much for fear they will get lost. 

I now know how to raise prairie chick- 
ens. Next year I am going to use turkey 
hens that I know won't wander off. 

I intended to ship you some eggs but 
could never find a nest that the hen had 
not started to set on them. 

I would like very much to know how 
I could catch this turkev hen and her 
brood of prairie chickens. If I don't 
get them I have at least solved the puzzle 
"how to raise them." 

[Make a good sized turkey trap of fence 
rails or chicken wire. Have an entrance 
through a ditch under one side and across 
this ditch on the inside of the pen place a 
wide board or two for a bridge. Feed grain 
to the birds for a day or two, leaving the pen 
open on one side. Later close the side and 
place grain in the ditch so the turkey and 
brood can pass through the ditch under the 
bridge on the inside. When caught they will 
march around the sides of the pen and cross 
the bridge instead of going under it. — Editor.] 



Game Birds and Poultry Wanted. 

Sometimes we receive a request that a 
reader's wants be made known in a read- 
ing notice. We are obliged to stamp 
such notices as advertising matter when 
a copy of the magazine is filed at the 
post office and we of course charge for 
them. The following request will no 
doubt procure the pheasants and we have 
no doubt some of our readers will fur- 
nish the Hamburg and White Crested 
pullets. 

I am in the market for : 
6 male and 4 female Golden Pheasants 
25 Hamburg pullets 
25 white crested Polish pullets. 
I. Tanenbaum, 
170 Broadway, New York 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Important. 

New York, N. Y., Aug. 24, 1918. 
Hon. E. W. Nelson, 

Chief, Biological Survey, 
Washington, D. C. 
Dear Sir: — 

I have decided not to make any ap- 
plication to the Survey for a permit to 
possess, buy and sell migratory water- 
fowl. I notice that your permit contains 
a clause stating, "1 agree that if 
said permit is issued I will comply with 
all the provisions of the Migratory 
Bird Treaty Act and regulations there- 
under." The State laws, under which 
our Association and many other 
breeders have large numbers of wild 
ducks which they have produced by in- 
dustry, for shooting and incidentally to 
supply the people with wild ducks to eat, 
permit shooting. I notice that one of 
your regulations which is in effect a crim- 
inal law (although I do not believe the 
Congress had any intention of making 
such a crime) provides that wild fowl 
may be killed in any manner except by 
shooting. Since the birds we own and 
the birds owned by many other breed- 
ers were produced for shooting, I would 
like to inquire if it is your intention to 
arrest people who may continue to shoot 
their birds provided they let the people . 
have some to eat after supplying their 
own needs. The inducement to produce 
cheap game for the people to eat is shoot- 
ing. Darwin has said as much, and all 
sportsmen and naturalists are aware that 
if the main inducement to do anything 
be removed, there is a great likelihood 
of the thing never being done. 

I am aware that your principal advisor 
told the Congress that he did not want 
any preserves or the sale of game which 
went with them ; that he did not want 
the American people to have the cheap 
food which the people have in all civil- 
ized countries. Having imparted this ad- 
vice, the Congress enacted Section 12, 
which I quote for your convenience from 
the Migratory Law : 

Section 12. "Nothing in this act shall 
be construed to prevent the breeding of 
migratory game birds on farms and pre- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



181 



serves and the sale of birds so bred un- 
der proper regulation for the purpose of 
increasing the food supply. You will ob- 
serve that the Congress mentioned the 
breeding of game on preserves for the 
purpose of increasing the food supply. 
Since it is absolutely certain that not a 
single bird will be bred on a preserve 
for the purpose named if you attempt to 
enforce your regulations requiring that 
the birds be taken only with the hatchet, 
I am inclined to think that the courts 
will hold that your attempt to make a 
criminal law is at variance with the inten- 
tions of the Congress, which I surely be- 
lieve were intended to let the people pro- 
duce some cheap food and to encourage 
such production and not to absolutely 
prevent it, as your regulation surely will 
if the people pay any attention to it. 

Of course, if you can entice them to 
accept a permit to take birds and to sign 
an agreement in the application that they 
will only kill birds with a hatchet or oth- 
erwise than by shooting, the courts will 
possibly hojd that those who sign such 
agreements have done so for a good con-' 
sideration and that they must close their 
preserves or at least stop shooting wild 
ducks with any view to increasing the 
food supply. 

I am not afraid of what the courts 
will do to people who refuse to sign 
permits, and, in fact, I shall welcome 
your game police at^any time they may 
see fit to attempt to stop the food pro- 
duction in which game breeders are now 
engaged. 

If the courts shall hold that a gentle- 
man who says he does not want any 
game preserves, the sale of game, or 
cheap game for the people to eat, has 
the right to make a criminal Jaw (under 
which a food producer may be found 
operating) which will send him to jail if 
he continues to supply the people with 
food, I am firmly convinced that the 
sooner some one serves a term in jail 
for this food producing crime the better 
it will be for the country. The fact 
that this gentleman hurriedly consulted 
two others before he made this regula- 
tion does not impress me with the idea 
that it is a good crime, legally created, 
and I certainly believe the courts will 



hold; reading the law, that the legisla- 
ture had no intention of making such a 
crime or of sending people to jail be- 
cause they may produce food and sell it 
to the people. You understand, of 
course, that the industry I refer to is 
conducted on private lands owned or 
rented for the purpose. You must know 
what the effect of enforcing this new 
criminal law will be on producers who 
are now operating and on all persons 
who may attempt to produce food in the 
future. 

I am sending you a stamped envelope 
for reply with a special delivery stamp 
attached, since I consider it of the ut- 
most importance to make known your 
attitude as chief of a new police depart- 
ment and that you should especially 
state if such be the case that you will 
arrest every food producer who is found 
in the future taking the food he produces 
in the way he legally can take it under 
State laws, providing he lets any of the 
people have some of the food to eat at 
moderate prices. I know you will apprer 
date the importance of immediately giv- 
ing publicity to your intentions and I feel 
quite sure you will find upon investiga- 
tion that you have been entangled in a 
lot of nonsense, by some game law enthusi- 
asts who are prejudiced against anybody 
doing anything except in a way that they 
mayjdecide to have them do it. 

P. S. — Since the game farmers in 
America (as in the older countries) sell 
their eggs and birds to shooting syndi- 
cates and individuals who own or rent 
shooting preserves it would seem that 
you intend to put thousands of game 
farmers in America out of business. You 
will agree with me. I am sure, if you 
destroy the food producing customers 
for the game farmers the game farmerr- 
must go out of business. 

T .am perfectly sure that you had no 
intention of strangling a promising in- 
dustry which has had a rapid and suc- 
cessful growth in America, and I hope 
your regulations can be amended so that 
all food producers now operating can ap- 
ply for permits to take breeding stock 
and eggs. 



182 



THE GAME BREEDER 



"Letter from the Biological Survey. 

„ ^ . , August 27, 1918. 

Mr.'Dwight W. Huntington, 
Game Conservation Society, 

150 Nassau Street, New York City. 
Dear Sir : 

I have your letter of August 24 in which 
you state that you have decided not to comply 
with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and that 
you will make no application for a permit to 
possess, buy and sell migratory water fowl 
I regret that you have taken such a decision 
since I hoped that we might haye your co- 
operation in the sincere effort which this 
Bureau will make to build up game farming 
of migratory wild fowl. Of course, it is our 
duty to enforce the law and the regulations as 
they now stand. However, I wish to call your 
attention to the fact that the regulations are 
subject to change, and where a regulation can 
be shown to be unreasonably burdensome I 
t shall be glad to recommend a change. 

So far as concerns the food supply to be de- 
rived from birds raised in captivity and shot, 
I am inclined to think that the number of 
North American preserves on which wild fowl 
are grown in sufficient numbers to be shot is 
comparatively small. I shall, however, be 
glad to ■ be enlightened on this subject, and 
would be very glad indeed to have a complete 
list of such places with the acreage they con- 
tain. I may add that matters of this kind are 
subjects which we desire further 'to investigate 
at the earliest, possible moment for the purpose 
of securing information on which any neces- 
sary action may be taken. 
Yours truly, 

E. W. NELSON, 

Chief of Bureau. 



The Game Breeder's View Point. 

New York, N. Y., August 29, 1918. 
Hon. E. W. Nelson, 

Chief of the Biological Survey, 
Washington, D. C. 
Dear Sir : 

My point is not that I do not intend to 
comply with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 
but that so long as you refuse to comply with 
the terms of this act, I must decline to enter 
into any agreement in writing with you. 

I have no objection to complying with the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act. As a matter of 
fact, I shall be willing to list all of the ducks 
we -have although they are not migratory and 
I am sure any court will hold that thev are 
personal property not covered by any law 
enacted since the title for this food property 
was acquired. I say I would be willing to list 
these birds and to keep you well informed 
about the numbers we rear and the numbers 
we shoot and sell. The point I wish to make 
is that we would stop production instantly if 
you attempted to raid us as food producers 
have been raided by State officers for trivial 
offenses, fanciful in the extreme, containing no 
moral turpitude, and absolutely at variance 
with the terms of the Migratory Law. 



The word preserve has a well defined mean- 
ing. If you will turn to the Standard Dic- 
tionary published by Funk & Wagnalls you 
will find "preserve, a place in which game is 
protected for the purpose of sport." 

The Congress when it enacted the Migratory 
Bird Bill had been fully advised that your 
chief adviser does not want any preserves or 
the sale of food which goes with them. The 
Congressional Record shows that he made this 
statement to a Committee of the Congress and 
tried to make it very plain that he might be 
able to excite some prejudice against food 
production and the employment of skilled 
labor, such as gamekeepers, to produce the 
food. Having heard the argument against 
food production the Congress added a section 
to the Migratory Bill which reads, "Nothing 
in this, act shall be construed to prevent the 
breeding of migratory game birds on farms 
and preserves and the sale of birds so bred 
under proper .regulations for the purpose of 
increasing the food supply." You will ob- 
serve having heard the statement that we 
don't want any food production in this coun- 
try or any preserves or the. sale of food from 
such places, the Congress proceeded to say that 
nothing in the act shall prevent the sale of 
food from not only farms but also from pre- 
serves. The fact that shooting causes the 
abundance of the food is well known and it 
seems to me highly unreasonable for those 
who were defeated in the Congress to attempt 
to win out by having you make a regulation 
which will send food producers to jail pro- 
vided it be executed, unless the courts decide 
against your regulation. 

I am absolutely sure of my position that 
when Congress says you shall not interfere 
with food producers on farms and preserves 
that you cannot upset the action of the law- 
makers by passing a subsequent law which is 
intended to prevent food producers from pro- 
ducing food on preserves. 

It seems that the same persons who were 
defeated in Congress are behind the regula- 
tion which says there shall be no sport and 
this means no food production on the places 
named by Congress as places which should not 
be interfered with on account of their ability 
to increase the food supply. I notice your re- 
quest for a complete list of the places where 
birds are bred for sport and for food. There 
are a large number of such places in spite of 
the hostility of some small politicians. You 
may have read the story of one man being 
arrested and fined $15,000 because he trapped 
a few birds for breeding purposes. Of course, 
in States where grafters can take in half of the 
money collected in fines and where they have 
the opportunity to threaten people with arrest 
and tell them they will not arrest them if they 
will pay a good, big sum, there are not so many 
food producing plants as there would be if 
they could be freed from what I have long 
regarded as- legal atrocities. The Congress 
was advised that in England the shooting is 
only for the rich. I think it likely most of 
the men in Congress know that this is abso- 









THE GAME BREEDER 



183 



lutely untrue; that many thousands of market 
gunners shoot the migratory fowl and bring 
them to the markets just as our fishermen bring 
in the fish. I am sure many people in a coun- 
try where game can be freely produced, and 
where it is always a cheap food in the mar- 
kets, would not tolerate the many thousands 
of arrests which 'have been made in America, 
many of them being made because the party 
who was arrested was attempting to produce 
food on land which he owns. 

In order to make my position perfectly plain, 
I wish to say that I am prepared to apply for 
a permit at any time when I am not obliged 
to sign away my right to field sports, as your 
adroit regulations now require me to do. In 
other words, I regard your regulation (which, 
it is claimed, is a criminal law) as an attempt 
to defeat the statute made by Congress and I 
feel absolutely sure when the question goes to 
the courts, if you wish it to go there, that 
quickly they will decide that of the two law- 
making powers, that of Congress is superior 
to that of those by whom you are surrounded. 
You perhaps will understand now why I have 
siad that I believed it would be wise for the 
National Congress to create a Bureau of Game 
somewhat similar to the Bureau of Fisheries. 
The Bureau of Fisheries does not, when it 
gives fish to people in order that they may 
propagate them, insist that they cannot use a 
hook or a line. If the Bureau should get into 
any such fanciful frame of mind, I believe I 
would do a great public service if I should 
insist that that Bureau be abolished. 

I do not altogether like your regulation pro- 
viding that it is a United States crime in 
some parts of the country and not in others 
(the lines running somewhat irregularly, I 
do not know where) to shoot a dove, which 
is a very desirable food, as Audubon says, 
somewhat better than a quail. You may be 
interested to know that I produced several 
hundred doves one season by providing an 
abundance of food for them, and, being a 
law-abiding citizen, as I am, I did not shoot 
any of the birds-or eat any of the food pro- 
duced on the place. As a matter of fact, I 
heard that numerous people had excellent 
dove shooting, and, of course, enjoyed the 
food. Under your regulation, when the food 
leaves my place it can go to another place in 
the United States where it is not criminal to 
take it and eat it. I was taught that criminal 
laws should be uniform in their operation. 

I do not approve of your saying to me or 
to others that we cannot get quail from Mex- 
ico now. The Mexican people are willing to 
sell these food birds for breeding purposes. 
There is plenty of money among older men 
who have been rejected for military duty, as 
I was, who would be willing to perform a 
patriotic duty and nroduce some large quanti- 
ties of food providing they be not interfered 
with too much by what I am pleased to re- 
gard as fool regulations. If anvone can noint 
out why, the weather being suitable,' the Mex- 



icans being willing to sell, food producers 
being willing to buy, no one should be per- 
mitted to produce any quail or make prepa- 
rations to do so, I should be glad to have 
them do so. Our whole game law structure 
seems to be built on the idea that it is 
criminal to produce food on the farms and 
preserves and that such industry must be 
checkmated. I feel perfectly right in my 
opinion that numerous arrests of men and 
women have been made by small people be- 
cause they wished to break up a food-pro- 
ducing industry which does not happen to 
meet their views as to what the people may 
produce on their farms or other lands which 
they may own. The Agricultural Department 
does not favor the arrest of farmers because 
they take other foods in what seems to them 
the best way to take them. There should be 
no regulation (even in the absence of the 
preserve owners' protection in the United 
States law) preventing people from taking the 
food in the only way they can be expected to 
take it. To say that the sportsmen must run 
about and put salt on the tails of their birds 
or must catch them otherwise in order to kill 
them with a hatchet, is to say that there will 
be no production, and it may seem, to some 
people, that this is the intention of the regula- 
tion, since it is proposed by people who were 
defeated when they said to the Congress we 
do not want preserves or gamekeepers, or food 
production or the sale of game, or anything 
like that in this country. This in effect is to 
say that we do not want the freedom which 
there is in other countries where people can 
raise any kind of plant or animal on their 
property and where market gunners can shoot 
and sell the desirable food to the people as 
freely as the fishermen sell food to our people. 
It seems likely that the farmers will take a 
very decided interest in this throughout the 
country, and I regret very much to have a 
bureau of the Agricultural Department hos- 
tile to their interests. I could tell you, if, I 
would; of places where many thousands of 
acres of farm lands are freed from taxes be- 
cause it is legal for sportsmen to take birds 
from the farms, and in order to do so they 
pay the farmers' taxes. I do not think it is 
desirable for people who ar& hostile to such 
industry to know where such places are. I 
know perfectly, well that many people do not 
desire to have any publicity which may bring 
down upon them the animosity of people who 
say we do not want any food production in 
America, or, as I have sometimes heard them 
put it: "There is plenty of beef and mutton 
in America and the people do not need to have 
other food." The only reason for this that I 

(Continued on pag-e 187.) 



184 



THE GAME ^REEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER, 1918. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotio, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



TO THE BIOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

We would urge the Survey to read 
Section 12 of the new law. 

To make a regulation that no birds 
bred on preserves can be shot in order 
to increase the food supply is to pro- 
vide that there shall be no preserves and 
we believe that the courts will hold that 
those who breed birds under laws en- 
couraging them to take breeding stock 
should own the young and supply the 
people with the food. Had the legisla- 
tors intended to say birds can only be 
bred on game farms the section would 
have omitted the words "game pre- 
serves." If it appears to the court that 
the shooting causes the abundance of the 
cheap food, we do not believe the court 
will say that a gentleman who doesn't 
want any preserves or the sale of game 
which goes with them has the right, 
sitting as an independent law maker, to 
make a criminal statute (for such will 
be the regulation) providing that a pre- 
serve owner shall be arrested provided 
he shoots his ducks and sells the food 
to the people at prices cheaper than 
poultry. The laws says preserves. Who 
ever heard of a game preserve without 
shooting? 

Our readers will remember that we 
feared what would happen provided the 
Congress ' delegated its crime making 
power to a few game laws enthusiasts, 



some of whom admit that they have 
been making a living procuring game 
laws and protecting game for many 
years. 



Having fully explained to the Con- 
gress that we don't want any preserves 
or the sale of game or any cheap food 
in America, the Congress decided to 
mention preserves in the law and to indi- 
cate that food production should be en- 
couraged and not prevented by the pre- 
serve methods. 

It seems incredible when reading the 
statute to think that the courts will hold 
that the Congress intended to abolish all 
the club shoots and preserves which 
have been supplying^ food to the mar- 
kets. The regulation (or criminal law), 
made by the fellow who doesn't want food 
production, may cause the courts to de- 
cide that United States crimes should 
not be made by one man even if he gets 
two other private citizens to approve of 
his conduct and puts the thing through 
in the shape of a regulation. Are the peo- 
ple to be arrested for crimes so made ? 



No Game Farming, No Breeding, No 
Game Keepers, No Food Wanted! 

The country places, shooting clubs, 
syndicates and preserves are the best 
customers of the game farmers and 
game breeders, big and small. They 
purchase eggs in the spring and birds in 
the summer, fall and winter. 

To say that we don't want any game 
preserves in this country or the sale of 
game that goes with them, as Mr. Burn- 
ham, the president of the Game Protec- 
tive Association, recently said, to a 
congressional committee, is in effect to 
say we don't want any customers for 
game farmers or game breeders and we 
don't want any game keepers employed 
in America. 

To say that we don't want any sales 
of food just now, knowing that such 
sales surely will result in a great abun- 
dance of food, and stating that such has 
been the result in countries which have^ 
game laws founded on common sense, is 
a peculiar form of patriotism. It looks 
more to us like small politics. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



185 



The farmers in America may be count- 
ed on to back up the intelligent game 
farmers and sportsmen who believe that 
land owners should have the right to 
produce profitably any species of plant 
or animal on the farms which they own. 
It is a very poor time to insist that it 
must be criminal to produce food on the 
farms. The danger is not that there will 
be too many game farms and preserves 
but that there will not be enough until 
the farmers know what they can do and 
how to do it. The State # Game Depart- 
ments have a rare opportunity to dis- 
seminate the information and to assist 
those who would produce in every way. 
The destroyers will be surprised to find 
how good the shooting will become for all 
hands when America becomes the 
biggest game producing country in the 
world. Even the market gunners are 
permitted to shoot all the game they can 
in the older countries. They do not 
shoot the farmers' chickens or his game 
any more than gunners in America shoot 
on the farms without permission. 



FINISHING TOUCHES. 

To complete- the "More Game and 
Fewer Game Laws" program now on 
the way to a rapid finish, unless we are 
much mistaken in the outlook, it is quite 
necessary to amend the laws slightly in 
some of the States. 

(1) They should be made to conform 
to the U. S. law permitting the tak- 
ing and sale of migratory birds and eggs 
for breeding purposes and for food, omit- 
ting the "otherwise than by shooting" 
nonsense. The law says game farmers 
and preserves, and of course shooting is 
intended. 

(2) They should be amended so as to 
permit the taking of grouse, quail and 
other birds and their eggs for breeding 
purposes under liberal regulations, the 
charge being no greater than the license 
charge to destroy a similar number of 
birds — $1 or $2 to destroy, same charge 
to trap and preserve would be about 
right. 

(3) In States where the laws only en- 
courage the production of foreign spe- 
cies of game and of a few American 



game birds, which least need the breed- 
ers' attention because of their abundance, 
the laws should be amended so as. to 
permit the breeding of all American 
birds and game animals and their regular 
sale when so produced by industry. 

(4) Game should be produced and 
sold on posted farms. As Professor 
Bailey of the N. Y. Agricultural College 
well said at the outset of the "more 
game and fewer game laws'' movement, 
in a letter to the editor, "the farmer's in- 
terests should be distinctly consulted" 
in the making of game laws. 

The title to game on farms should be 
in the farmers. Since they own a good 
part of the land where game can be pro- 
duced abundantly it is quite absurd to 
hold out the inducement to them that 
if they will produce the targets the State 
will license an army of destroyers to 
shoot up the farms. To advise the farm- 
ers that the birds are valuable to agri- 
culture is to advise them, under present 
conditions and laws, that they should 
seek amendments prohibiting the killing 
of the valuable birds at all seasons. It 
would be far better for all hands to pro- 
vide that they can keep the birds profita- 
bly plentiful and can profit by the abun- 
dance either by a sale of game alive or 
dead, or by arrangements with the 
shooters to pay something for the right 
to produce and shoot game. 

(5) The laws should recognize two 
kinds of game — (1) game on public 
lands and waters: (2) game on private 
farms which for the most part have been 
closed to sport. 

* 

OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

Miss Huggins — My brother Jack has 
been made bosun in the navy. What 
are vou doing for your country ? 

Miss Peachblow — Oh, I'm going to be 
the bosun's mate. 



More "Stuff." 

Several of the people who appeared be- 
fore the Congressional Committee in* an 
effort to make the District of Columbia a 
food prohibition area take in more money 
every season than the combined salaries 
of the Governors of five or ten States. 



186 



THE GAME BREEDER 







H^Ei»tr-" : M ~ Jr 






: n 




fcS* 


..* 


1 



FENCES 

POR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT" fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and fiO.000 Deople who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We»have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. H. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE: CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and .are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



FOR SALE. YOUNG BIRDS, THIS YEAR'S HATCH, 
one wing pinioned. Silver, I7.50 per pair; Goldens, 
$7.50 per pair; Ringnecks, $500 per pair; Mongolians, 
$6.50 per pair; Lady Amhersts, $12.50 per pair; Reeves, 
$12.50 per pair ; Redhead Ducks, $10.00 per pair ; Man- 
darin, Ducks, $12.50 per pair; Wood Ducks, $12.50 per pair; 
Mexican Tree Ducks, $12.50 per pair. M. R. CHEESMAN, 
Murray, R. F. D. No. 3, Utah. 3c 



Phone, 9286 Farragut 



FINE FURS 



JOHN MURGATRO YD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE EOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture,, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL PANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, Ml. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies, pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
r Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S. 8 Months for 25c 

AD. 4?ATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



187 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 

FOR SALE 



Hatched This Year 



Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTINO 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



(Continued from page 183.) 

can find is that "we say so" ; the "we" 
being a few people who collect vast sums of 
money to save the game. 

I shall be very glad to work with the Sur- 
vey, as I have with many intelligent people, 
provided the work laid out seems .intended to 
encourage the production of game as a food 
supply, which of course incidentally means 
the preservation of field sports in America. 
You can readily, see that, as a sportsman, it 
would be vqry unwise for me to make an 
application under your regulation since you 
require me to enter into an agreement with 
you in writing that I will give up field sports. 
This is the effect of the regulation. I am 
surely right in my idea that a preserve is a 
place where game is properly looked after 
"for the purpose of sport." I do not care to 
shoot 25 ducks in a day provided the ducks 
cannot be used as food. I cannot afford to 
produce a lot of ducks or quail or other spe- 
cies of food provided I cannot sell some of 
them in order to pay, at least, a part of the 
cost of production. As a matter of fact, I do 
not believe it will be interesting or profitable 
for me to attempt the breeding of any species 
of game unless part of the cost be charged 
to sport, as it is in every civilized country. 

I can hardly believe that you do not under- 
stand the subject. It has been well said that 



the way to bring about the repeal of a law is 
to see that it is executed. The same is true 
of regulations. Many good results have been, 
brought about by test cases in the courts. I 
wish to know if you propose to enforce the 
regulation which says I cannot shoot and sell 
a bird which I own. Your answer to this 
seems to be : "It is our duty to enforce the 
law and regulations as they now stand." I 
wish to call your attention to the fact that 
the regulations were made almost in the 
twinkling of an eye. It is perfectly plain, 
therefore, that if they are wrong they can be 
unmade as speedily as they were made. I 
believe there will be a hearty response from 
sportsmen -of my acquaintance who will ask 
for permits, provided they will not be required 
to agree that they will abandon field sports; 
and since the statute was enacted to increase 
food production it seems to me that you 
should be willing to abandon your regulation, 
which seems to discourage food production, 
and to see that you act in harmony with the 
statute and not in violation of it. 



POULTRY. MAN WANTED. POULTRY MAN. 

experienced assistant, willine to make himself generally 

useful ; a small estate in Westchester County ; state full 

details ; references required. ROOM 1409, 170 Broadway. 

N. Y. 



188 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 

XJ .. ^,~r~ ■:£.• I II ■ II ill II ^ IMl.. J IM» 

and Ringneck Pheasants j - ; - : 
WRITE POR PRICES 



\ 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



^:* 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 



A "Warning. 

Preserve owners applying to the Sec- 
retary of Agriculture for permits to trap 
wild ducks should read and strike out 
the section which, says : "I agree that if 
said permit is issued I will comply with 
all the provisions of the Migratory 
Treaty Act, and regulations thereunder/' 

One of the regulations is intended to 
put an end to shooting. Under the pre- 
tense' of giving the preserve owners the 
right to take, ducks for breeding pur- 
poses they are asked to sign away their 
right to shoot and, of course, having 
agreed not to shoot any more, the courts 
may hold that a good and valid agree- 
ment has been made to stop producing 
food, since no preserve owner will con- 
tinue to produce after he has agreed not 
to shoot. The Biological Survey has 
adopted a sure way of stopping food pro- 
duction in the future and possibly the 
owners of ducks who sign the agreement 
may be required to discharge their game 
keepers and put the stock they now own 
under the hatchet. 






In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Youn for More Game.~ 



THE GAME BREEDER 



189 




WE HAVE 

For Sale 

Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, lmpeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tus, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. I. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 for new Colortype Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



Yama Brook Trout 



Hi 

ft 



Scientifically bred by the Darwinian 
theory for vigor, quick growing to large size 
and to produce a large number of eggs — ■ 
absolutely free of disease, frequently thriv- 
ing where others die. 

Information in, reference to trout breed- 
ing and keeping cheerfully given by our 
trout culturist. 

Scientific examination made of your con- 
ditions for keeping trout at moderate charge. 

We have on hand for stocking 1,500,000 
Yama Trout from fry to 2 lbs. Eggs in 
seaaon. 

YAMA FARMS 
Napanoch, Ulster County, N. Y- 



There will be no customers for game 
farmers provided the shooting be stopped. 
In England and other countries the game 
farms sell their eggs and birds to those 
who multiply them for shooting. Why 
not enact laws stopping the sale of am- 
munition? The game must vanish if 
every one shoots and no one is permitted 
to save and produce, Remove the in- 
centive to production, shooting, and an 
end is put to production. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island , Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
1Q£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2200 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 




America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 



BOOK OTV 

DOG DISEASES 
And How to Feed 

Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



TWO YOUNG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 

sale. Dog and Bitch. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York. 3 t 



190 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Cggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ring necks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 
BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

Member of the Game Guild. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $6.00, 
100 eggs, $35. * 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 
Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



LIVEIGAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 






DARK MALLARD 

Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range * 
especially for shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN -^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San-Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 
•» 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER ■ 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 

ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, ' ' 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 







In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Your* for More Gam*.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



1U1 



r-tf^r <■'••- ."■ • 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 
I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese.'Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

We have Ringnecks and ten |= 
other species of Pheasants. s 
Eggs in season. One day 
old pheasant chicks 65 
cents each. Flemish Giants 
and •other rabbits. 

THE MAPLE GROVE PHEASANTRY AND PET 

STOCK FARM, 43ldenAve., Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



150 Nassau 



THE GAME 

Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



FOR SALE 
These Pheasants will be in full plumage this fall : 4 pair 
Silvers, $3000 ; 2 extra hens', $10.00. 1 pair Swinhoes, 
835 00. 1 pair Mongolian, $7.00; 3 extra cocks, 8600. 
10 Ringneck hens, $30.00 ; i Ringneck cocks, $5.00 3 pair 
Lad> Amhersts, $5000 ; 1 extra cock, $10 00. 1 pair Gold- 
ens, $8 00; 3 extra hens, $15.00. 1 pair Reeves, $15.00: 
2 extra hens, $20 00. 5 pair Canada geese, 5 years old, 
$35.00. 6 pair Redheads, $50 00 ;' 1 pair Baldpates, $5 00; 
1 pair Pintails, $3 00. 1 pair wood ducks, $12 50; 1 pair 
Mandarin ducks, $12 50. 1 pair Mexican tiee ducks, $1250. 
M. R. CHEESMAN, Murray, Utah, R F.D. No. 3. Box 61. 

FOR SALE— PET FEMALE COON. GUARANTEED 

breeder, three years old. Had five last litter. Stamp 

for reply. BEN BOWMAN, Monroe Ave., Canton, Ohio 

It 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA. 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

LIVE GAME ' 

WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — RINGNECK, GOLDEN PHEASANT, 
and silver. We are going to close out our pheasantry 
Prices reasonable. OCCONEECHEE FARM, Durham, 
N. C. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot,- Ontario, 
Canada ■ 3t 

PURE BRED WILD WATERHOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices: Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue W11 g leal, 
$375 per pair. Also reiheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, lor propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. , 

HOYTS CALIFORNIA PHEASANT RY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward. California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY . 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N.J. 



FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (i t) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way 10 start 
breeding this st ecies. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans.Wild Duoks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

BELGIAN HARES AND FLEMISH. GIANTS FOR 

sale. Al stock. C. W. DIXON, 8612 Moigan Street, 

Chicago, 111. it 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl Soemmerring, Cheer, H< ki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Ml. Sterling, Ky. 



Swans, Brandt, Ducks 



TWO PAIR LARGE WHITE ROYAL SWAN OF 
England, mature birds, $150.00 a pair. Also two pair 
young Swan from same birds, $100.00 pair. Two pair 
Black Brandi, rare, very handsome, $40 00 pair. Two 
pair whistling Tree Ducks, $40.00 pair. One pair (rested 
Turkeys (currasaws , $75. 00 pair. Immediate delivery. 
Also rate wild Pigeons, Pheasants, foreign birds of song 
and plumage. J L. OAKES, 44 West Maple Avenue, 
Den>-. r Colorado. It 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



iy2 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FOR SALE — PURE MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS. 
C. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. at 

CHINESE. RINGNECK AND MONGOLIAN CROSS, 
Cocks $2.00, hens $4.00. Golden and Silver, young cocks 
$3 00, hens ft 5.00- Golden, old cocks $4.00, hens $6.00. 
Wild geese and ducks. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL 
FARM, Manzanita, Oregon. 3t 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, H ADLYME, CONN. 

Rirtgneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lots. 
Write for prices,' including shipping charges. W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



TD/^\^\'I^"0 Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

D\J\s£\.\J Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



WISH CHANGE .OF POSITION AS POULTRY 

man or gamekeeper by married man. No children. 

Life experience, four years at present position, excellent 

references. L. W. WERTHEIM, Hillsboro, N. C. It 

GAMEKEEPER — POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 
gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionpert, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPER— SITUATION WANTED 

American game'breeder with a 15 year experience wishes 
to raise 5000 ringnecks for a private party or State, and 
having an incubator and brooder plant. Apply to THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION. THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE. LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER.— SITUATION WANTED. — I can 

furnish flood English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper; can rear thousands) of birds, and train 
dogs, isc. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to get a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address J. H., care of The Game Breeder, ISO 
Nassau Street, New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



200 PHEASANTS WANTED WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age ot birds. 
R. A. MAX WELL, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York: 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 220Q Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED. EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS. 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH, ONAWA, 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 

published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 



ALL GAME BREEDERS SHOULD REMEMBER 
that Meal Worms are just as choice a food for the old 
birds as for the young; of course, as a rule, they are not 
fed to the old because they will live without them, except 
occasionally by a man of means, who does not believe in 
depriving his birds of an occasional luxury. However, all 
breeders should keep on hand a pan or two of meal worms, 
to feed to their old birds when a little out of sorts, at 
moulting time or when being dosed with drugs. Meal 
worms are an excellent tonic, because a natural insect food. 
500 at $1.00, 1,000 at $1.50, 5,000 at $5 00. All express pre- 
paid. C. B. KERN, 10 East Main Street, Mount joy, 
Pennsylvania. It 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 





Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood- Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beat 
Royal Swans of England. I have nne lot 01 the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large Europeaa 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANKS, PK.AKOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acre* 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 

W1VL J. MACKENSEN 

Department V. YARDLEY. BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




SELBY LOADS 

(g) T iBLACK SHELLS 
WINCHESTER 




R3 m \fkt ton - 

SELBY LOADS 

(g) \BLACK SHELLS j 

Winchester 



LEADER 



HM&2MLES 

SmoAefesgmtgun 



INFALLIBLE 




What's Inside of Them? 



Look at the 14 shells pictured above. 
You can tell at a glance which one is your 
favorite because you know what its outside 
looks like But do you think as much as 
you should of what is inside of the shell? 

When you buy shells, you are always 
careful to select the brand that you are 
accustomed to shoot. You should be just 
as careful to make sure that your favorite 
shell is loaded with a Hercules Smokeless 
Shotgun Powder. Look at the end of the 




The dependability of Hercules Powders 
has made them the stanch friends of 
many experienced sportsmen. Let them 
be your friends. 

You may shoot your shells today, next 
month, or next year; theywill always give 
the same high velocity with light recoil 
and the same even patterns, no matter 
what their age. Neither time nor atmos- 
pheric conditions affect their reliable 
quality when they are loaded with Infal- 
ibleor "E.C." 



box for the name Infallible or E. C." 1 

Any one of the 14 standard brands pictured above can be bought 
loaded with Hercules. You should have no difficulty in getting 
your favorite shell loaded with either Infallible or "E. C." 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

77 West 11th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 





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